Sleep Disturbance in Family Caregivers of Children Who Depend on Medical Technology: The Care to Sleep Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/338390
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sleep Disturbance in Family Caregivers of Children Who Depend on Medical Technology: The Care to Sleep Study
Author(s):
Keilty, Krista; Stremler, Robyn
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Kappa Pi-at-Large
Author Details:
Krista Keilty, NP-Paediatrics, krista.keilty@utoronto.ca; Robyn Stremler, RN, MSc(A), PhD
Abstract:
Session presented on Friday, September 26, 2014: Background/Rationale: Society relies on family caregivers of children who depend on medical technology (e.g. home ventilation) to provide highly skilled and vigilant care 24-hours per day. Few studies exist that have measured sleep in family caregivers and those that do have relied entirely on subjective measures. These data suggest that sleep disruption places family caregivers at risk for poor health and related outcomes that may impair their daytime function and long-term capacity for caregiving. Objectives/Research Questions: The primary aim of this study was to compare sleep and related outcomes in family caregivers of children who depend on medical technology to family caregivers of healthy children. Methods: In a prospective cohort study (balanced per child’s age) 42 family caregivers of children who depend on medical technology were recruited from a tertiary-level paediatric hospital and 43 controls from community-based paediatric clinics. Actigraphy was used for 6 days/7 nights and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was applied to collect sleep data. At home-visits sleep diaries were collected and measures of depression (CES-D) sleepiness (ESS) fatigue (MAF) quality of life (SF-12©) sleep hygiene (SHI) and child’s sleep quality (CSHQ) were administered. Results: Family caregivers of children who depend on medical technology achieved 40 minutes less sleep per night (393.58 mins ± 82.07 vs 433.08 mins ± 33.15, p= .007) had more nocturnal awakenings (p= 0.02) and had more sleep deprived (<6 hours) nights (x2= 7.44 df = 1, p = .006) than controls. Scores on sleep quality (PSQI) also differed (7.75 ±2.93 vs 5.45 ±2.77, p= .001). Other statistically significant differences were found in outcomes of depression, sleepiness, fatigue, and child’s sleep quality (p < .02). Significance/Implications: This study confirms using objective measurement that family caregivers of children who depend on medical technology experience significant sleep deprivation and its negative consequences. Results of the study inform future sleep intervention studies with this vulnerable group.
Keywords:
caregivers; pediatrics; sleep
Repository Posting Date:
15-Jan-2015
Date of Publication:
15-Jan-2015
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
Leadership Summit 2014
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Leadership Summit 2014 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSleep Disturbance in Family Caregivers of Children Who Depend on Medical Technology: The Care to Sleep Studyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKeilty, Kristaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStremler, Robynen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentKappa Pi-at-Largeen_GB
dc.author.detailsKrista Keilty, NP-Paediatrics, krista.keilty@utoronto.ca; Robyn Stremler, RN, MSc(A), PhDen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/338390-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Friday, September 26, 2014: Background/Rationale: Society relies on family caregivers of children who depend on medical technology (e.g. home ventilation) to provide highly skilled and vigilant care 24-hours per day. Few studies exist that have measured sleep in family caregivers and those that do have relied entirely on subjective measures. These data suggest that sleep disruption places family caregivers at risk for poor health and related outcomes that may impair their daytime function and long-term capacity for caregiving. Objectives/Research Questions: The primary aim of this study was to compare sleep and related outcomes in family caregivers of children who depend on medical technology to family caregivers of healthy children. Methods: In a prospective cohort study (balanced per child’s age) 42 family caregivers of children who depend on medical technology were recruited from a tertiary-level paediatric hospital and 43 controls from community-based paediatric clinics. Actigraphy was used for 6 days/7 nights and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was applied to collect sleep data. At home-visits sleep diaries were collected and measures of depression (CES-D) sleepiness (ESS) fatigue (MAF) quality of life (SF-12©) sleep hygiene (SHI) and child’s sleep quality (CSHQ) were administered. Results: Family caregivers of children who depend on medical technology achieved 40 minutes less sleep per night (393.58 mins ± 82.07 vs 433.08 mins ± 33.15, p= .007) had more nocturnal awakenings (p= 0.02) and had more sleep deprived (<6 hours) nights (x2= 7.44 df = 1, p = .006) than controls. Scores on sleep quality (PSQI) also differed (7.75 ±2.93 vs 5.45 ±2.77, p= .001). Other statistically significant differences were found in outcomes of depression, sleepiness, fatigue, and child’s sleep quality (p < .02). Significance/Implications: This study confirms using objective measurement that family caregivers of children who depend on medical technology experience significant sleep deprivation and its negative consequences. Results of the study inform future sleep intervention studies with this vulnerable group.en_GB
dc.subjectcaregiversen_GB
dc.subjectpediatricsen_GB
dc.subjectsleepen_GB
dc.date.available2015-01-15T13:36:46Z-
dc.date.issued2015-01-15-
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-15T13:36:46Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.nameLeadership Summit 2014en_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.descriptionLeadership Summit 2014 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact himen_GB
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