Improving Nursing Students Knowledge and Skills in Caring for Patients Experiencing IPV

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/338407
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improving Nursing Students Knowledge and Skills in Caring for Patients Experiencing IPV
Author(s):
Iturralde, Marina
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Chi
Author Details:
Marina Iturralde, High school, iturralm@bc.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Friday, September 26, 2014: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significant public health issue associated with numerous negative health outcomes. Numerous organizations including the American Nurses Association and The Joint Commission recommended routine screening in a variety of health care settings for IPV. Nurses are uniquely poised to screen and intervene with victims of IPV. The nurse-patient relationship and ongoing interactions during a health care encounter provides opportunities for nurses to ask questions about personal safety and experiences with violence. However, there are a number of barriers that prevent nurses from screening and/or intervening with victims. Education of nurses on the topic of IPV should begin in nursing school. Undergraduate and graduate curriculum may include content on family or intimate partner violence, however, student nurses have few opportunities to practice and refine the skills. The purpose of this project is to test the use of simulation experiences to increase undergraduate nursing students knowledge, awareness and skills related to assessment and intervention of intimate partner violence. The long-term goal is to have well developed, tested simulation scenarios that can be integrated into the education curriculum at both the undergraduate and graduate level. Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significant public health issue. Victims of IPV have an increased risk of experiencing both physical and mental health problems. Numerous organizations including the American Nurses Association (2000) and The Joint Commission recommended routine screening in a variety of health care settings for IPV. Barriers include the nurses of lack formal education and training, a lack of time and privacy, misconceptions and attitudes about women who experience abuse. Undergraduate and graduate curriculum may include content on family or intimate partner violence, however, student nurses have few opportunities to practice and refine the skills. The purpose of this study is to pilot the use of educational modules to increase undergraduate nursing students knowledge, awareness, and skills related to assessment and intervention of intimate partner violence.
Keywords:
Simulation education; Intimate Partner Violence; Increased awareness
Repository Posting Date:
15-Jan-2015
Date of Publication:
15-Jan-2015
Other Identifiers:
LEAD14PST106
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
Leadership Summit 2014
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Leadership Summit 2014 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.
Note:
Items submitted to a conference/event were evaluated/peer-reviewed at the time of abstract submission to the event. No other peer-review was provided prior to submission to the Henderson Repository.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleImproving Nursing Students Knowledge and Skills in Caring for Patients Experiencing IPVen_US
dc.contributor.authorIturralde, Marinaen
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Chien
dc.author.detailsMarina Iturralde, High school, iturralm@bc.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/338407-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Friday, September 26, 2014: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significant public health issue associated with numerous negative health outcomes. Numerous organizations including the American Nurses Association and The Joint Commission recommended routine screening in a variety of health care settings for IPV. Nurses are uniquely poised to screen and intervene with victims of IPV. The nurse-patient relationship and ongoing interactions during a health care encounter provides opportunities for nurses to ask questions about personal safety and experiences with violence. However, there are a number of barriers that prevent nurses from screening and/or intervening with victims. Education of nurses on the topic of IPV should begin in nursing school. Undergraduate and graduate curriculum may include content on family or intimate partner violence, however, student nurses have few opportunities to practice and refine the skills. The purpose of this project is to test the use of simulation experiences to increase undergraduate nursing students knowledge, awareness and skills related to assessment and intervention of intimate partner violence. The long-term goal is to have well developed, tested simulation scenarios that can be integrated into the education curriculum at both the undergraduate and graduate level. Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significant public health issue. Victims of IPV have an increased risk of experiencing both physical and mental health problems. Numerous organizations including the American Nurses Association (2000) and The Joint Commission recommended routine screening in a variety of health care settings for IPV. Barriers include the nurses of lack formal education and training, a lack of time and privacy, misconceptions and attitudes about women who experience abuse. Undergraduate and graduate curriculum may include content on family or intimate partner violence, however, student nurses have few opportunities to practice and refine the skills. The purpose of this study is to pilot the use of educational modules to increase undergraduate nursing students knowledge, awareness, and skills related to assessment and intervention of intimate partner violence.en
dc.subjectSimulation educationen
dc.subjectIntimate Partner Violenceen
dc.subjectIncreased awarenessen
dc.date.available2015-01-15T13:37:06Z-
dc.date.issued2015-01-15-
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-15T13:37:06Z-
dc.conference.date2014en
dc.conference.nameLeadership Summit 2014en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionLeadership Summit 2014 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.en
dc.description.noteItems submitted to a conference/event were evaluated/peer-reviewed at the time of abstract submission to the event. No other peer-review was provided prior to submission to the Henderson Repository.-
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