CT Time: A Vital Measurement in the Treatment of Moderate to Severe Head Injuries

11.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/338408
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
CT Time: A Vital Measurement in the Treatment of Moderate to Severe Head Injuries
Author(s):
Dodd, Brett A.; Washburn, Thomas G; Sava, Jack A,
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Phi Pi
Author Details:
Brett A. Dodd, RN, CEN, CCRN, CFRN, brett.dodd@medstar.net; Thomas G Washburn, RN, BSN; Jack A, Sava, MD, FACS
Abstract:
Session presented on Friday, September 26, 2014: Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is one of the most common types of injury seen by trauma centers. Many patients suffering from TBI die in the field before ever reaching a hospital. According to the American College of Surgeons (ACS) of all patients with TBI that do seek medical care, 25% can be classified as moderate to severe (2012). ACS also estimated that 1,700,000 TBIs occur annually, 250,000 patients are hospitalized, and 52,000 patients die. US data estimates 80,000 - 90,000 patients each year suffer a TBI with long-term disability. The primary goal in the care of TBI patients is to prevent secondary injury. Preventative measures include ensuring adequate oxygenation and maintaining adequate blood pressure to ensure perfusion of the brain. After stabilization of the ABCs, the goal is to rapidly identify a mass lesion that may require surgical intervention. This is achieved by obtaining a computerized tomographic (CT) scan of head. Some of the expected challenges for achieving our goal door-to-CT scan time included performing necessary lifesaving procedures prior to head CT scan, ensuring good team dynamics during initial patient arrival, and prompt transport of the patient for the head CT scan. Other factors that were out of our control were radiology delays and delays due to physician discretion. Our team for gathering and reviewing data included two nurses and one physician. Data was retrospectively gathered for 8 months prior to implementing any change. This data was then shared with the nurses in the department as a whole and then on an individual basis. Care was taken to emphasize this project was to improve our departments process and patient outcomes and in no way was being used a disciplinary tool. Suggestions from staff were then gathered and best practices shared within the group. As nurses began to understand the department goal and felt empowered to make decisions on delaying unnecessary procedures until after CT scan we began to see improvement. In addition, nursing began thinking steps ahead and moving with more purpose. The ultimate goal was to improve patient outcomes and encourage nursing staff to be patient advocates for those presenting with head injuries.
Keywords:
Head injury; Traumatic Brain Injury; Door-to-CT scan
Repository Posting Date:
15-Jan-2015
Date of Publication:
15-Jan-2015
Other Identifiers:
LEAD14PST98
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
Leadership Summit 2014
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Leadership Summit 2014 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.
Note:
Items submitted to a conference/event were evaluated/peer-reviewed at the time of abstract submission to the event. No other peer-review was provided prior to submission to the Henderson Repository.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleCT Time: A Vital Measurement in the Treatment of Moderate to Severe Head Injuriesen_US
dc.contributor.authorDodd, Brett A.en
dc.contributor.authorWashburn, Thomas Gen
dc.contributor.authorSava, Jack A,en
dc.contributor.departmentPhi Pien
dc.author.detailsBrett A. Dodd, RN, CEN, CCRN, CFRN, brett.dodd@medstar.net; Thomas G Washburn, RN, BSN; Jack A, Sava, MD, FACSen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/338408-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Friday, September 26, 2014: Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is one of the most common types of injury seen by trauma centers. Many patients suffering from TBI die in the field before ever reaching a hospital. According to the American College of Surgeons (ACS) of all patients with TBI that do seek medical care, 25% can be classified as moderate to severe (2012). ACS also estimated that 1,700,000 TBIs occur annually, 250,000 patients are hospitalized, and 52,000 patients die. US data estimates 80,000 - 90,000 patients each year suffer a TBI with long-term disability. The primary goal in the care of TBI patients is to prevent secondary injury. Preventative measures include ensuring adequate oxygenation and maintaining adequate blood pressure to ensure perfusion of the brain. After stabilization of the ABCs, the goal is to rapidly identify a mass lesion that may require surgical intervention. This is achieved by obtaining a computerized tomographic (CT) scan of head. Some of the expected challenges for achieving our goal door-to-CT scan time included performing necessary lifesaving procedures prior to head CT scan, ensuring good team dynamics during initial patient arrival, and prompt transport of the patient for the head CT scan. Other factors that were out of our control were radiology delays and delays due to physician discretion. Our team for gathering and reviewing data included two nurses and one physician. Data was retrospectively gathered for 8 months prior to implementing any change. This data was then shared with the nurses in the department as a whole and then on an individual basis. Care was taken to emphasize this project was to improve our departments process and patient outcomes and in no way was being used a disciplinary tool. Suggestions from staff were then gathered and best practices shared within the group. As nurses began to understand the department goal and felt empowered to make decisions on delaying unnecessary procedures until after CT scan we began to see improvement. In addition, nursing began thinking steps ahead and moving with more purpose. The ultimate goal was to improve patient outcomes and encourage nursing staff to be patient advocates for those presenting with head injuries.en
dc.subjectHead injuryen
dc.subjectTraumatic Brain Injuryen
dc.subjectDoor-to-CT scanen
dc.date.available2015-01-15T13:37:08Z-
dc.date.issued2015-01-15-
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-15T13:37:08Z-
dc.conference.date2014en
dc.conference.nameLeadership Summit 2014en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionLeadership Summit 2014 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.en
dc.description.noteItems submitted to a conference/event were evaluated/peer-reviewed at the time of abstract submission to the event. No other peer-review was provided prior to submission to the Henderson Repository.-
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