2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/338429
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Community Gardens' Role in Pediatric Nutrition
Author(s):
von Ahn, Erick
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-Member
Author Details:
Erick von Ahn, BA, LPN, erickvonahn@yahoo.com
Abstract:
Session presented on Thursday, September 25, 2014: According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) obesity rates have climbed over the past 30 years. Currently, one-third of children in the U.S. are overweight or obese (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2014). The likelihood of being obese as an adult is 70% higher for obese children (Obesity Action Coalition, 2014). Pediatric obesity increases the risks for cardiovascular disease, diabetes, asthma, gastrointestinal inflammatory pathologies, cancer, premature menarche, psychiatric and social pathologies (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2014; Ohio Department of Health, 2008; Allison & Hyde, 2013; McIntyre, 2011; Wiskin, Owens, Cornelious, Wooton & Beatier, 2012). Poverty is a risk factor for obesity (Edmunds, Chiasson, Stratton & Davison, 2014). Many low income families live in food deserts where access to healthy food is limited (Muamba, Clark & Taggart, 2010). In 2008 the Ohio Department of Health (ODH) reported Cuyahoga County, Ohio had a lower median income than the state, and nation. The CDC reported in 2013 that high school children are averaging 1 serving of fruit and 1.3 servings of vegetables daily (National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion: Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, 2013). Community gardens have been utilized effectively to help overweight and obese children improve their body mass index (Castro, Samuels & Harmon, 2013). Exposing children to gardening and healthy food preparation at a young age increases a preference for vegetables (Cramer, 2012).Community gardens provide fruits and vegetables to families who previously lacked access (Barnidge, Hipp, Estlund, Duggan, Barnhart & Brownson, 2013). Community gardens increase fruit and vegetable consumption, physical activity, and increase psychological and spiritual health (Stein, 2008; Flachs, 2010; Twiss, Dickinson, Duma, Kleinman, Paulsen & Rilveria, 2003).Community gardeners also eat more vegetables than home-gardeners (Litt, Soobader, Turbin, Hale, Buchenau, & Marshall, 2011). Community gardens are a holistic approach to promote pediatric nutrition and wellness.
Keywords:
Nutrition; Wellness; Community Garden
Repository Posting Date:
15-Jan-2015
Date of Publication:
15-Jan-2015
Other Identifiers:
LEAD14PST73
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
Leadership Summit 2014
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Leadership Summit 2014 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.
Note:
Items submitted to a conference/event were evaluated/peer-reviewed at the time of abstract submission to the event. No other peer-review was provided prior to submission to the Henderson Repository.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleCommunity Gardens' Role in Pediatric Nutritionen_US
dc.contributor.authorvon Ahn, Ericken
dc.contributor.departmentNon-Memberen
dc.author.detailsErick von Ahn, BA, LPN, erickvonahn@yahoo.comen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/338429-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Thursday, September 25, 2014: According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) obesity rates have climbed over the past 30 years. Currently, one-third of children in the U.S. are overweight or obese (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2014). The likelihood of being obese as an adult is 70% higher for obese children (Obesity Action Coalition, 2014). Pediatric obesity increases the risks for cardiovascular disease, diabetes, asthma, gastrointestinal inflammatory pathologies, cancer, premature menarche, psychiatric and social pathologies (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2014; Ohio Department of Health, 2008; Allison & Hyde, 2013; McIntyre, 2011; Wiskin, Owens, Cornelious, Wooton & Beatier, 2012). Poverty is a risk factor for obesity (Edmunds, Chiasson, Stratton & Davison, 2014). Many low income families live in food deserts where access to healthy food is limited (Muamba, Clark & Taggart, 2010). In 2008 the Ohio Department of Health (ODH) reported Cuyahoga County, Ohio had a lower median income than the state, and nation. The CDC reported in 2013 that high school children are averaging 1 serving of fruit and 1.3 servings of vegetables daily (National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion: Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, 2013). Community gardens have been utilized effectively to help overweight and obese children improve their body mass index (Castro, Samuels & Harmon, 2013). Exposing children to gardening and healthy food preparation at a young age increases a preference for vegetables (Cramer, 2012).Community gardens provide fruits and vegetables to families who previously lacked access (Barnidge, Hipp, Estlund, Duggan, Barnhart & Brownson, 2013). Community gardens increase fruit and vegetable consumption, physical activity, and increase psychological and spiritual health (Stein, 2008; Flachs, 2010; Twiss, Dickinson, Duma, Kleinman, Paulsen & Rilveria, 2003).Community gardeners also eat more vegetables than home-gardeners (Litt, Soobader, Turbin, Hale, Buchenau, & Marshall, 2011). Community gardens are a holistic approach to promote pediatric nutrition and wellness.en
dc.subjectNutritionen
dc.subjectWellnessen
dc.subjectCommunity Gardenen
dc.date.available2015-01-15T13:37:32Z-
dc.date.issued2015-01-15-
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-15T13:37:32Z-
dc.conference.date2014en
dc.conference.nameLeadership Summit 2014en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionLeadership Summit 2014 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.en
dc.description.noteItems submitted to a conference/event were evaluated/peer-reviewed at the time of abstract submission to the event. No other peer-review was provided prior to submission to the Henderson Repository.-
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