2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/344123
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Poster
Title:
Pit Bull Bites in Children
Author(s):
Kulp, Heather; Murphy, Stephen
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Heather Kulp, BSN, MPH, hkulp@nemours.org; Stephen Murphy, MD
Abstract:
Research Abstract Purpose: Dog bites in children are common and often emotionally and physically traumatic for patients and families. Research on pit bull bites is lacking in regards to injuries, severity and circumstances surrounding bites in children. While legislation in the United States has not been passed banning this breed, many other countries have taken this step. Design: We conducted a retrospective study of pediatric patients with all dog bites included in our trauma database. Demographic information collected included age, gender, race, weight, height, insurance type and zip code. Additional data included length of stay, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), vital signs on admission, complications, injuries by location, need for operating room, and consulting services. Outcome data included need for follow up, complications, discharge status and Injury Severity Score (ISS). Dog and bite specific information was also collected. Setting: Currently we are the only Level I pediatric trauma center in our state, beginning as a Level III trauma center in 2006. Our teaching institution treated over 950 pediatric trauma patients in 2012. Of this population, 5% have the mechanism of injury of dog bite injury, with our most common mechanism of injury being falls. Participants/Subjects: Our trauma database was queried for all dog bite injuries from January 2007 to December 2012. All pediatric patients under the age of 18 years were included. Queries were run using e-codes from the Official ICD-9-CM Coding Guidelines. Patients that were discharged to home from Emergency Department and not included in our trauma database were excluded as well as those that had any non-bite injuries from a dog. Our total sample size was 149 patients. This project was reviewed and approved by our Institutional Review Board and consent was waived. Methods: This research was conducted retrospectively by chart review of patient’s records. Patients with pit bull bites were compared to those with bites from non-pit bull breeds. Analysis was done using IBM SPSS version 19. Significance was considered for p values ≤0.05. Results/Outcomes: 22% of all bites were by pit bulls or pit bull mix. Independent t-tests were conducted to compare length of stay and ISS. Children bit by pit bulls had a mean ISS of 3.8±3.9 when compared to non-pit bull bite ISS of 1.8±2.6, while all 149 patients had a mean ISS of 2.2±3.0. Mean ISS were significantly higher in the pit bull group than the non-pit bull bite group (p≤0.05). Length of stays were also significantly longer in patients bit by pit bulls, 4.76±8.8 vs. 1.33±.95, p<0.05. Demographic data also shows rising pit bull bites at our institution, as well as our state. Nearly 70% of pit bull injured patients had Medicare, public or no insurance at all. Future geo-mapping could determine areas of higher risk. Implications: While all dog bites are concerning for parents and hospital staff, those with pit bull bites are more severely injured and have longer length of stays, yet are primarily patients with little or no insurance coverage. Injury prevention strategies should be aimed at this population.
Keywords:
Dog bites
Repository Posting Date:
4-Feb-2015
Date of Publication:
4-Feb-2015
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
2014 ENA Annual Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, U.S.A.
Description:
2014 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Indiana Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePosteren_GB
dc.titlePit Bull Bites in Childrenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKulp, Heatheren_GB
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Stephenen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsHeather Kulp, BSN, MPH, hkulp@nemours.org; Stephen Murphy, MDen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/344123-
dc.description.abstractResearch Abstract Purpose: Dog bites in children are common and often emotionally and physically traumatic for patients and families. Research on pit bull bites is lacking in regards to injuries, severity and circumstances surrounding bites in children. While legislation in the United States has not been passed banning this breed, many other countries have taken this step. Design: We conducted a retrospective study of pediatric patients with all dog bites included in our trauma database. Demographic information collected included age, gender, race, weight, height, insurance type and zip code. Additional data included length of stay, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), vital signs on admission, complications, injuries by location, need for operating room, and consulting services. Outcome data included need for follow up, complications, discharge status and Injury Severity Score (ISS). Dog and bite specific information was also collected. Setting: Currently we are the only Level I pediatric trauma center in our state, beginning as a Level III trauma center in 2006. Our teaching institution treated over 950 pediatric trauma patients in 2012. Of this population, 5% have the mechanism of injury of dog bite injury, with our most common mechanism of injury being falls. Participants/Subjects: Our trauma database was queried for all dog bite injuries from January 2007 to December 2012. All pediatric patients under the age of 18 years were included. Queries were run using e-codes from the Official ICD-9-CM Coding Guidelines. Patients that were discharged to home from Emergency Department and not included in our trauma database were excluded as well as those that had any non-bite injuries from a dog. Our total sample size was 149 patients. This project was reviewed and approved by our Institutional Review Board and consent was waived. Methods: This research was conducted retrospectively by chart review of patient’s records. Patients with pit bull bites were compared to those with bites from non-pit bull breeds. Analysis was done using IBM SPSS version 19. Significance was considered for p values ≤0.05. Results/Outcomes: 22% of all bites were by pit bulls or pit bull mix. Independent t-tests were conducted to compare length of stay and ISS. Children bit by pit bulls had a mean ISS of 3.8±3.9 when compared to non-pit bull bite ISS of 1.8±2.6, while all 149 patients had a mean ISS of 2.2±3.0. Mean ISS were significantly higher in the pit bull group than the non-pit bull bite group (p≤0.05). Length of stays were also significantly longer in patients bit by pit bulls, 4.76±8.8 vs. 1.33±.95, p<0.05. Demographic data also shows rising pit bull bites at our institution, as well as our state. Nearly 70% of pit bull injured patients had Medicare, public or no insurance at all. Future geo-mapping could determine areas of higher risk. Implications: While all dog bites are concerning for parents and hospital staff, those with pit bull bites are more severely injured and have longer length of stays, yet are primarily patients with little or no insurance coverage. Injury prevention strategies should be aimed at this population.en_GB
dc.subjectDog bitesen_GB
dc.date.available2015-02-04T11:26:52Z-
dc.date.issued2015-02-04-
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-04T11:26:52Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name2014 ENA Annual Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, U.S.A.en_GB
dc.description2014 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Indiana Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_GB
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