2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/344125
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Poster
Title:
Efficacy of Urine Cultures and Sensitivity in an Immediate Care Center
Author(s):
Rusie, Michelle K.; Haggard, Tonya; Smith, Anne; Smallwood, Marijane; Aiello, Robert
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Michelle K. Rusie, BSN, RN, CEN, mkrusie@hendricks.org; Tonya Haggard, ASN, RN; Anne Smith, BSN, RN; Marijane Smallwood, MSN, RN, NE-BC; Robert Aiello, MD
Abstract:
Research Abstract Purpose: The Immediate Care Center (ICC) received multiple patient complaints regarding the cost of urine cultures. These complaints triggered the ICC Unit Practice Council to review this practice. The objective of the research was to determine if ordering urine culture and sensitivity tests on adult patients who come to the ICC with symptoms of urinary tract infections impacts the treatment in the majority of patients. Design: This was a retrospective chart review using a convenient sample of patients age 18 years and older. IRB approval was obtained to collect patient data. There were 1760 patients 18 years and older who presented with the diagnosis codes of 599.0, urinary tract infection, and 788.1, dysuria, in 2011 at the ICC. A random selection of charts was accomplished by choosing every 10th chart from each facility. Setting: Two suburban ICCs affiliated with a 160-bed community hospital. Participants/Subjects: Of the 1760 patients aged 18 years or older who presented to both ICCs in 2011 with the diagnosis of urinary tract infection or dysuria, 20% were randomly selected. Methods: A retrospective chart review was used to compile the data. Results/Outcomes: Urinary tract infections and dysuria are common diagnosis at the ICC. Patients with those complaints receive a urine dip to test the urine during their visit. Sometimes a urine culture and sensitivity is also ordered. 155 patients or 41% had a positive urine dip, were treated with an antibiotic, and did not have a urine culture and sensitivity ordered. 100 patients or 27% did have a urine culture and sensitivity ordered. Only 7 patients or 1% had a treatment change based on the results of the urine culture and sensitivity. With the downturn of the economy, many patients either lost their insurance or had to pay higher deductibles, and became more aware of the billing process. The charge for a urine culture and sensitivity is $317.25, which for those 100 patients, $31,725.00 was billed. Literature review revealed that no current studies have been conducted in an urgent care setting related to care of uncomplicated urinary tract infections in the adult. Research confirms that the majority of UTI treatment is sought by females. With the movement toward accountable care, processes should be evaluated to decrease cost and improve patient outcomes. Implications: The ICC educated all of the providers, MDs and NPs, informing them that only 1% of the patients had their treatment impacted by the order of a urine culture in 2011. The cost was also shared with the providers. It is anticipated that there will be a decrease in the number urine culture and sensitivity tests ordered for patients aged 18 years and older at the ICC. Follow up research is planned to determine if providers made changes in their practice during 2013.
Keywords:
Urine Cultures; Efficacy of Urine Cultures
Repository Posting Date:
4-Feb-2015
Date of Publication:
4-Feb-2015
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
2014 ENA Annual Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, U.S.A.
Description:
2014 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Indiana Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePosteren_GB
dc.titleEfficacy of Urine Cultures and Sensitivity in an Immediate Care Centeren_GB
dc.contributor.authorRusie, Michelle K.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorHaggard, Tonyaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Anneen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSmallwood, Marijaneen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAiello, Roberten_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsMichelle K. Rusie, BSN, RN, CEN, mkrusie@hendricks.org; Tonya Haggard, ASN, RN; Anne Smith, BSN, RN; Marijane Smallwood, MSN, RN, NE-BC; Robert Aiello, MDen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/344125-
dc.description.abstractResearch Abstract Purpose: The Immediate Care Center (ICC) received multiple patient complaints regarding the cost of urine cultures. These complaints triggered the ICC Unit Practice Council to review this practice. The objective of the research was to determine if ordering urine culture and sensitivity tests on adult patients who come to the ICC with symptoms of urinary tract infections impacts the treatment in the majority of patients. Design: This was a retrospective chart review using a convenient sample of patients age 18 years and older. IRB approval was obtained to collect patient data. There were 1760 patients 18 years and older who presented with the diagnosis codes of 599.0, urinary tract infection, and 788.1, dysuria, in 2011 at the ICC. A random selection of charts was accomplished by choosing every 10th chart from each facility. Setting: Two suburban ICCs affiliated with a 160-bed community hospital. Participants/Subjects: Of the 1760 patients aged 18 years or older who presented to both ICCs in 2011 with the diagnosis of urinary tract infection or dysuria, 20% were randomly selected. Methods: A retrospective chart review was used to compile the data. Results/Outcomes: Urinary tract infections and dysuria are common diagnosis at the ICC. Patients with those complaints receive a urine dip to test the urine during their visit. Sometimes a urine culture and sensitivity is also ordered. 155 patients or 41% had a positive urine dip, were treated with an antibiotic, and did not have a urine culture and sensitivity ordered. 100 patients or 27% did have a urine culture and sensitivity ordered. Only 7 patients or 1% had a treatment change based on the results of the urine culture and sensitivity. With the downturn of the economy, many patients either lost their insurance or had to pay higher deductibles, and became more aware of the billing process. The charge for a urine culture and sensitivity is $317.25, which for those 100 patients, $31,725.00 was billed. Literature review revealed that no current studies have been conducted in an urgent care setting related to care of uncomplicated urinary tract infections in the adult. Research confirms that the majority of UTI treatment is sought by females. With the movement toward accountable care, processes should be evaluated to decrease cost and improve patient outcomes. Implications: The ICC educated all of the providers, MDs and NPs, informing them that only 1% of the patients had their treatment impacted by the order of a urine culture in 2011. The cost was also shared with the providers. It is anticipated that there will be a decrease in the number urine culture and sensitivity tests ordered for patients aged 18 years and older at the ICC. Follow up research is planned to determine if providers made changes in their practice during 2013.en_GB
dc.subjectUrine Culturesen_GB
dc.subjectEfficacy of Urine Culturesen_GB
dc.date.available2015-02-04T11:26:56Z-
dc.date.issued2015-02-04-
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-04T11:26:56Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name2014 ENA Annual Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, U.S.A.en_GB
dc.description2014 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Indiana Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_GB
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