2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/344129
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Poster
Title:
Prevalence and Nature of Bullying in the WorkplaceE of Nurses
Author(s):
Turi, Stephanie; Ziemba-Davis, Mary
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Stephanie Turi, MSN, RN, CEN, skturi@stvincent.org; Mary Ziemba-Davis
Abstract:
Research Abstract Purpose: Safe and effective patient care require a collaborative work environment free from intimidating and disruptive behaviors. Research indicates that more than 50% of nurse’s world-wide have experienced workplace bullying, and that bullying is prevalent in emergency departments. The purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence of bullying experienced by nurses, initiators of the behavior, nurse perceptions about bullying, and personal effects of bullying. Design: Our goal was to comprehensively describe bullying in the study setting. Purposive sampling was used to achieve completion of a quantitative survey by all nurses. Setting: The study was conducted in fall 2011 at an 800-bed hospital with a Level II trauma center located in the Midwestern United States. Participants/Subjects: With IRB approval, all RNs and LPNs (n = 2,122) working in inpatient and outpatient settings were invited to anonymously complete an online questionnaire. Participants included bedside and non-bedside nurses. Eight-hundred and fifty-three nurses participated. The response rate was 40.2%. Methods: The World Health Organization’s definition of workplace bullying was used. Twenty-two behaviors indicative of bullying among nurses were examined based on literature review. Frequency in the last 12 months and who engaged in the behavior (nurse, physician, patient, etc.) were asked for each of the behaviors. Two additional questions probed how bullying is perceived by nurses and personal effects of bullying. Demographics included gender, education, position type, work shift, years of experience as a nurse, and specialty/unit. The instrument was distributed on an internally licensed, secure SurveyMonkey® application. Minitab 16 was used for statistical analysis. Prevalence was described by proportions. X2 was used to examine variations in prevalence by demographics. ANOVA was used to compare mean agreement on perceptions of bullying. Results/Outcomes: Bullying was highly prevalent in our study regardless of unit. In the last 12 months, 94% of nurses had experienced one or more of the 22 bullying behaviors. The average number of bullying behaviors was 8.7 (SD 5.6). Prevalence ranged from 8% having experienced someone suggesting they are mentally unstable or psychologically unwell to 78% having experienced someone speak to or about them in a belittling and demeaning manner. Nurses were identified as the group that most frequently bullied nurses. Patients/family/visitors most often engaged in the most aggressive behaviors—being yelled at and physically being pushed, grabbed, or shoved. 90% of respondents agreed that bullying negatively affects patient care and 85% disagreed that bullying is just part of the job. Nurses reported that workplace bullying has affected their enjoyment of their profession (58%), job satisfaction (57%), self-confidence on the job (54%), and their personal life (42%). Nonetheless, less than one-third believe that bullying is a problem where they work. Implications: Results suggest that nurses, including emergency department nurses, believe bullying is acceptable, despite high personal consequences. Our findings highlight the importance of raising awareness about intimidating and disruptive behaviors which can undermine the quality and safety of patient care, the well-being of individual nurses, and the integrity of the nursing profession.
Keywords:
Bullying of nurses; workplace bullying
Repository Posting Date:
4-Feb-2015
Date of Publication:
4-Feb-2015
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
2014 ENA Annual Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, U.S.A.
Description:
2014 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Indiana Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePosteren_GB
dc.titlePrevalence and Nature of Bullying in the WorkplaceE of Nursesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTuri, Stephanieen_GB
dc.contributor.authorZiemba-Davis, Maryen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsStephanie Turi, MSN, RN, CEN, skturi@stvincent.org; Mary Ziemba-Davisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/344129-
dc.description.abstractResearch Abstract Purpose: Safe and effective patient care require a collaborative work environment free from intimidating and disruptive behaviors. Research indicates that more than 50% of nurse’s world-wide have experienced workplace bullying, and that bullying is prevalent in emergency departments. The purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence of bullying experienced by nurses, initiators of the behavior, nurse perceptions about bullying, and personal effects of bullying. Design: Our goal was to comprehensively describe bullying in the study setting. Purposive sampling was used to achieve completion of a quantitative survey by all nurses. Setting: The study was conducted in fall 2011 at an 800-bed hospital with a Level II trauma center located in the Midwestern United States. Participants/Subjects: With IRB approval, all RNs and LPNs (n = 2,122) working in inpatient and outpatient settings were invited to anonymously complete an online questionnaire. Participants included bedside and non-bedside nurses. Eight-hundred and fifty-three nurses participated. The response rate was 40.2%. Methods: The World Health Organization’s definition of workplace bullying was used. Twenty-two behaviors indicative of bullying among nurses were examined based on literature review. Frequency in the last 12 months and who engaged in the behavior (nurse, physician, patient, etc.) were asked for each of the behaviors. Two additional questions probed how bullying is perceived by nurses and personal effects of bullying. Demographics included gender, education, position type, work shift, years of experience as a nurse, and specialty/unit. The instrument was distributed on an internally licensed, secure SurveyMonkey® application. Minitab 16 was used for statistical analysis. Prevalence was described by proportions. X2 was used to examine variations in prevalence by demographics. ANOVA was used to compare mean agreement on perceptions of bullying. Results/Outcomes: Bullying was highly prevalent in our study regardless of unit. In the last 12 months, 94% of nurses had experienced one or more of the 22 bullying behaviors. The average number of bullying behaviors was 8.7 (SD 5.6). Prevalence ranged from 8% having experienced someone suggesting they are mentally unstable or psychologically unwell to 78% having experienced someone speak to or about them in a belittling and demeaning manner. Nurses were identified as the group that most frequently bullied nurses. Patients/family/visitors most often engaged in the most aggressive behaviors—being yelled at and physically being pushed, grabbed, or shoved. 90% of respondents agreed that bullying negatively affects patient care and 85% disagreed that bullying is just part of the job. Nurses reported that workplace bullying has affected their enjoyment of their profession (58%), job satisfaction (57%), self-confidence on the job (54%), and their personal life (42%). Nonetheless, less than one-third believe that bullying is a problem where they work. Implications: Results suggest that nurses, including emergency department nurses, believe bullying is acceptable, despite high personal consequences. Our findings highlight the importance of raising awareness about intimidating and disruptive behaviors which can undermine the quality and safety of patient care, the well-being of individual nurses, and the integrity of the nursing profession.en_GB
dc.subjectBullying of nursesen_GB
dc.subjectworkplace bullyingen_GB
dc.date.available2015-02-04T11:27:01Z-
dc.date.issued2015-02-04-
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-04T11:27:01Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name2014 ENA Annual Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, U.S.A.en_GB
dc.description2014 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Indiana Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_GB
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