2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/344130
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Poster
Title:
Addressing CAUTI in the Emergency Department
Author(s):
Turi, Stephanie
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Stephanie Turi, MSN, RN, CEN, skturi@stvincent.org
Abstract:
Evidence-based Practice Abstract Purpose: Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) account for the majority of hospital acquired urinary tract infections (UTI’s). Considering more than half of hospitalizations come through the Emergency Department (ED), avoiding placement of unnecessary urinary catheter in the ED may considerably affect the utilization of urinary catheters during a patient’s hospitalization. The purpose of this quality improvement project was to identify and reduce the number of inappropriately placed urinary catheters inserted in an Adult ED. Design: This quality improvement project was done by determining urinary catheter utilization in an Adult ED. After initial data collection on urinary catheter usage, an educational program followed, aimed at educating nursing and physicians on the appropriate and inappropriate reasons urinary catheters are placed in the Emergency Department. Program maintenance was assessed and promoted through periodic evaluation & education on urinary catheters utilization, as well as regular unit rounding by a Clinical Nurse Specialist. Setting: A 40 bed Adult ED that receives 55,000 visits per year and is part of a 800-bed quaternary care hospital in the Midwestern United States. Participants/Subjects: Registered Nurse’s, Emergency Physician’s, Paramedics and Emergency Medical Technicians employed by the Adult ED. Methods: Between June 2012 and July 2012 audits were done for two weeks to determine how many patients received urinary catheters in the Adult ED, if the indication for the catheter was appropriate and if a physician order was present. Nursing and physician champions were identified and education began in the ED that focused on evidenced based guidelines for appropriate indications for urinary catheters. The Ascension Health toolkit was utilized for educating in proper insertion technique and proper indications for catheter placement. Results/Outcomes: Urinary catheter utilization at baseline was 9.2% with 16 % of the catheters placed without an appropriated indication. Post intervention, the percent of urinary catheters placed in the Adult ED decreased to 5% and inappropriately placed urinary catheters decreased to 0% and remained consistent for 7 months Implications: We were able to impact inappropriate urinary catheters in our ED. Statistical significance was met, as there were more inappropriate placed urinary catheters pre-intervention than post- intervention at a 95% confidence level, p= 0.0413359. Future investigation would include establishing if the reduction is maintained, overtime and to determine if the reduction in inappropriate urinary catheter utilization in the ED reflects a reduction in prevalence of CAUTI hospital wide.
Keywords:
CAUTI; Catheter-associated urinary tract infections; Catheters
Repository Posting Date:
4-Feb-2015
Date of Publication:
4-Feb-2015
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
2014 ENA Annual Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, U.S.A.
Description:
2014 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Indiana Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePosteren_GB
dc.titleAddressing CAUTI in the Emergency Departmenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorTuri, Stephanieen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsStephanie Turi, MSN, RN, CEN, skturi@stvincent.orgen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/344130-
dc.description.abstractEvidence-based Practice Abstract Purpose: Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) account for the majority of hospital acquired urinary tract infections (UTI’s). Considering more than half of hospitalizations come through the Emergency Department (ED), avoiding placement of unnecessary urinary catheter in the ED may considerably affect the utilization of urinary catheters during a patient’s hospitalization. The purpose of this quality improvement project was to identify and reduce the number of inappropriately placed urinary catheters inserted in an Adult ED. Design: This quality improvement project was done by determining urinary catheter utilization in an Adult ED. After initial data collection on urinary catheter usage, an educational program followed, aimed at educating nursing and physicians on the appropriate and inappropriate reasons urinary catheters are placed in the Emergency Department. Program maintenance was assessed and promoted through periodic evaluation & education on urinary catheters utilization, as well as regular unit rounding by a Clinical Nurse Specialist. Setting: A 40 bed Adult ED that receives 55,000 visits per year and is part of a 800-bed quaternary care hospital in the Midwestern United States. Participants/Subjects: Registered Nurse’s, Emergency Physician’s, Paramedics and Emergency Medical Technicians employed by the Adult ED. Methods: Between June 2012 and July 2012 audits were done for two weeks to determine how many patients received urinary catheters in the Adult ED, if the indication for the catheter was appropriate and if a physician order was present. Nursing and physician champions were identified and education began in the ED that focused on evidenced based guidelines for appropriate indications for urinary catheters. The Ascension Health toolkit was utilized for educating in proper insertion technique and proper indications for catheter placement. Results/Outcomes: Urinary catheter utilization at baseline was 9.2% with 16 % of the catheters placed without an appropriated indication. Post intervention, the percent of urinary catheters placed in the Adult ED decreased to 5% and inappropriately placed urinary catheters decreased to 0% and remained consistent for 7 months Implications: We were able to impact inappropriate urinary catheters in our ED. Statistical significance was met, as there were more inappropriate placed urinary catheters pre-intervention than post- intervention at a 95% confidence level, p= 0.0413359. Future investigation would include establishing if the reduction is maintained, overtime and to determine if the reduction in inappropriate urinary catheter utilization in the ED reflects a reduction in prevalence of CAUTI hospital wide.en_GB
dc.subjectCAUTIen_GB
dc.subjectCatheter-associated urinary tract infectionsen_GB
dc.subjectCathetersen_GB
dc.date.available2015-02-04T11:27:02Z-
dc.date.issued2015-02-04-
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-04T11:27:02Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name2014 ENA Annual Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, U.S.A.en_GB
dc.description2014 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Indiana Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_GB
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