2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/344134
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Poster
Title:
Giving Staff the Tools and Support to Report Workplace Violence
Author(s):
Larson, Erin; Levy, Maria
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Erin Larson, MSN, RN, larson.erin@mayo.edu; Maria Levy, BSN, RN
Abstract:
Evidence-based Practice Abstract Purpose: Workplace violence is increasing across the nation’s Emergency Departments, negatively impacting staff morale, healthcare delivery, and efficiency. In an effort to improve the quality and safety of the workplace, the aim of this project was to increase staff awareness of what constitutes workplace violence and to develop a simplified process for reporting, thereby allowing for more timely assessment and follow-up of staff needs. Design: This was a quality improvement project. Setting: The project was completed within the Emergency Department at a large academic level 1 trauma center. Participants/Subjects: Participants were gathered by convenience sampling and included all nurses and patient care assistants within the Emergency Department. There were no exclusion criteria. Participation was voluntary and was solicited through e-mail announcements. As a quality improvement project in ordinary operations, this initiative was not classified as research on human participants and did not need Institutional Review Board approval. Methods: A work group comprised of staff nurses and a nurse manager was formed. This workgroup created a 19-question online survey, modeled after the Emergency Nurses Association Emergency Department Violence Surveillance Study, which sought to assess staff perceptions of safety and violence in the workplace, exposure to violence, perceptions of preparedness in the event of violence, and knowledge of when and how to report violent events. Responses were collected and organized into graphs. The initial survey was distributed in the Spring, 2012 and staff was re-surveyed in the Summer, 2013 post-intervention. Responses from the initial survey indicated a need for a simplified reporting process as well as educational gaps regarding the perception that violence is a part of the job, what acts constitute violence, and what can happen following a violent event. Based on the results, a concise reporting tool was created and an educational program was developed, which included a review of the initial survey responses, factual representation of what acts constitute violence, and information on how to report violent events using the newly created reporting tool. Results/Outcomes: On the initial survey, more than half the staff perceived violence to be part of the job; on the follow-up survey, this number was reduced by more than half. From the initial survey to follow-up, results of what staff considered violent events were essentially unchanged. Prior to the intervention, from January to August, 2012, zero events were reported. In the five months following the intervention, nine events were reported and in 2013, over 50 events were reported. Implications: When given the tools and support to report violent behavior, staff demonstrated an increased awareness of, and a decreased tolerance for, workplace violence, as evidenced by the increased reporting of violent events, with some leading to criminal prosecution. Assessing knowledge gaps, providing education, creating a brief reporting tool, and acquiring the support of nursing leadership were imperative in empowering staff to support a movement towards a zero-tolerance policy for violence in the Emergency Department.
Keywords:
Workplace Violence; Tools to Report Violence in the ED
Repository Posting Date:
4-Feb-2015
Date of Publication:
4-Feb-2015
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
2014 ENA Annual Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, U.S.A.
Description:
2014 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Indiana Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePosteren_GB
dc.titleGiving Staff the Tools and Support to Report Workplace Violenceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLarson, Erinen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLevy, Mariaen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsErin Larson, MSN, RN, larson.erin@mayo.edu; Maria Levy, BSN, RNen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/344134-
dc.description.abstractEvidence-based Practice Abstract Purpose: Workplace violence is increasing across the nation’s Emergency Departments, negatively impacting staff morale, healthcare delivery, and efficiency. In an effort to improve the quality and safety of the workplace, the aim of this project was to increase staff awareness of what constitutes workplace violence and to develop a simplified process for reporting, thereby allowing for more timely assessment and follow-up of staff needs. Design: This was a quality improvement project. Setting: The project was completed within the Emergency Department at a large academic level 1 trauma center. Participants/Subjects: Participants were gathered by convenience sampling and included all nurses and patient care assistants within the Emergency Department. There were no exclusion criteria. Participation was voluntary and was solicited through e-mail announcements. As a quality improvement project in ordinary operations, this initiative was not classified as research on human participants and did not need Institutional Review Board approval. Methods: A work group comprised of staff nurses and a nurse manager was formed. This workgroup created a 19-question online survey, modeled after the Emergency Nurses Association Emergency Department Violence Surveillance Study, which sought to assess staff perceptions of safety and violence in the workplace, exposure to violence, perceptions of preparedness in the event of violence, and knowledge of when and how to report violent events. Responses were collected and organized into graphs. The initial survey was distributed in the Spring, 2012 and staff was re-surveyed in the Summer, 2013 post-intervention. Responses from the initial survey indicated a need for a simplified reporting process as well as educational gaps regarding the perception that violence is a part of the job, what acts constitute violence, and what can happen following a violent event. Based on the results, a concise reporting tool was created and an educational program was developed, which included a review of the initial survey responses, factual representation of what acts constitute violence, and information on how to report violent events using the newly created reporting tool. Results/Outcomes: On the initial survey, more than half the staff perceived violence to be part of the job; on the follow-up survey, this number was reduced by more than half. From the initial survey to follow-up, results of what staff considered violent events were essentially unchanged. Prior to the intervention, from January to August, 2012, zero events were reported. In the five months following the intervention, nine events were reported and in 2013, over 50 events were reported. Implications: When given the tools and support to report violent behavior, staff demonstrated an increased awareness of, and a decreased tolerance for, workplace violence, as evidenced by the increased reporting of violent events, with some leading to criminal prosecution. Assessing knowledge gaps, providing education, creating a brief reporting tool, and acquiring the support of nursing leadership were imperative in empowering staff to support a movement towards a zero-tolerance policy for violence in the Emergency Department.en_GB
dc.subjectWorkplace Violenceen_GB
dc.subjectTools to Report Violence in the EDen_GB
dc.date.available2015-02-04T11:27:06Z-
dc.date.issued2015-02-04-
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-04T11:27:06Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name2014 ENA Annual Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, U.S.A.en_GB
dc.description2014 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Indiana Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_GB
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