2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/344138
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Poster
Title:
Home Safe Home: Fall Prevention for Older Adults
Author(s):
Squindo, Sunny
Author Details:
Sunny Squindo, BSN, sjeffri1@hfhs.org
Abstract:
Evidence-based Practice Abstract Purpose: Every fifteen seconds, an older adult is treated in an Emergency Department because of a fall, resulting in over 2.3 million injuries annually. Falls are the number one cause of non-fatal injury, and significantly impact an older person’s quality of life. Through one-on-one interviews and personalized follow-up, the Home Safe Home program aims to prevent recurrent falls by helping individuals realize and address their fall risk factors, and connect with available community resources. Design: The project is an evidence-based injury prevention initiative, performed by an Injury Prevention Coordinator (IPC). Setting: The setting is a suburban, Level II- American College of Surgeons (ACS) verified Adult Trauma Center. Participants/Subjects: Patients over age sixty-five who live independently in the community and have been placed in the Observation Unit as a result of a fall are included for interview. Methods: Review of relevant literature and Center for Disease Control (CDC) recommendations suggest effective fall prevention programs consist of home safety evaluations, medication review, optimizing visual acuity, and regular exercise. Further research revealed numerous local programs offering these services. The IPC determined that a program focused on risk assessment as well as resource education would be particularly beneficial. Initiated in August 2013, the Home Safe Home project uses a one-on-one interview method for assessment of fall risk and dissemination of educational material. During the initial encounter, subjects are interviewed about their fall history, then engaged in an educational discussion related to preventative strategies. To accompany the recommended strategies, participants are also given a community resource list. A follow-up interview is conducted two months later to gauge how subjects responded to the recommendations, and if they have experienced additional falls. Based on this data, it can be determined if the interventions were successful in preventing recurrent falls, and also what interventions participants were likely to adopt. Results/Outcomes: From 08/13-12/13, initial interview and education sessions have been completed with 47 (n=47) individuals. Follow-up interviews have been completed with 16 (n=16) individuals 16/47, (34%). Of those participants who completed a follow-up interview, 2/16, (13%) reported a recurrent fall, and 11/16, (69%) reported adopting at least one recommendation. Increased level of exercise and home safety modifications were the most frequently adopted recommendation, both with 6/16, (38%) of participants stating that they had modified their lifestyles in this respect. Regular eye exams to ensure visual acuity was the least adopted intervention 1/16, (6%), as most subjects were compliant during the initial interview. Implications: Preliminary findings suggest that subjects are likely to adopt at least one of the interventions suggested, and that there has been little evidence of recurrent falls. Data is limited, however, due to the short time frame under review. Follow-up interviews have also proven difficult to complete, perhaps due to participants’ seasonal relocation. Although initial results are encouraging, further investigation is needed to determine the efficacy of the risk assessment, education, connection to community resources and follow-up methodology.
Keywords:
Fall Prevention; Home Safety; Elderly Fall Prevention
Repository Posting Date:
4-Feb-2015
Date of Publication:
4-Feb-2015
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
2014 ENA Annual Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, U.S.A.
Description:
2014 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Indiana Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePosteren_GB
dc.titleHome Safe Home: Fall Prevention for Older Adultsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSquindo, Sunnyen_GB
dc.author.detailsSunny Squindo, BSN, sjeffri1@hfhs.orgen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/344138-
dc.description.abstractEvidence-based Practice Abstract Purpose: Every fifteen seconds, an older adult is treated in an Emergency Department because of a fall, resulting in over 2.3 million injuries annually. Falls are the number one cause of non-fatal injury, and significantly impact an older person’s quality of life. Through one-on-one interviews and personalized follow-up, the Home Safe Home program aims to prevent recurrent falls by helping individuals realize and address their fall risk factors, and connect with available community resources. Design: The project is an evidence-based injury prevention initiative, performed by an Injury Prevention Coordinator (IPC). Setting: The setting is a suburban, Level II- American College of Surgeons (ACS) verified Adult Trauma Center. Participants/Subjects: Patients over age sixty-five who live independently in the community and have been placed in the Observation Unit as a result of a fall are included for interview. Methods: Review of relevant literature and Center for Disease Control (CDC) recommendations suggest effective fall prevention programs consist of home safety evaluations, medication review, optimizing visual acuity, and regular exercise. Further research revealed numerous local programs offering these services. The IPC determined that a program focused on risk assessment as well as resource education would be particularly beneficial. Initiated in August 2013, the Home Safe Home project uses a one-on-one interview method for assessment of fall risk and dissemination of educational material. During the initial encounter, subjects are interviewed about their fall history, then engaged in an educational discussion related to preventative strategies. To accompany the recommended strategies, participants are also given a community resource list. A follow-up interview is conducted two months later to gauge how subjects responded to the recommendations, and if they have experienced additional falls. Based on this data, it can be determined if the interventions were successful in preventing recurrent falls, and also what interventions participants were likely to adopt. Results/Outcomes: From 08/13-12/13, initial interview and education sessions have been completed with 47 (n=47) individuals. Follow-up interviews have been completed with 16 (n=16) individuals 16/47, (34%). Of those participants who completed a follow-up interview, 2/16, (13%) reported a recurrent fall, and 11/16, (69%) reported adopting at least one recommendation. Increased level of exercise and home safety modifications were the most frequently adopted recommendation, both with 6/16, (38%) of participants stating that they had modified their lifestyles in this respect. Regular eye exams to ensure visual acuity was the least adopted intervention 1/16, (6%), as most subjects were compliant during the initial interview. Implications: Preliminary findings suggest that subjects are likely to adopt at least one of the interventions suggested, and that there has been little evidence of recurrent falls. Data is limited, however, due to the short time frame under review. Follow-up interviews have also proven difficult to complete, perhaps due to participants’ seasonal relocation. Although initial results are encouraging, further investigation is needed to determine the efficacy of the risk assessment, education, connection to community resources and follow-up methodology.en_GB
dc.subjectFall Preventionen_GB
dc.subjectHome Safetyen_GB
dc.subjectElderly Fall Preventionen_GB
dc.date.available2015-02-04T11:27:10Z-
dc.date.issued2015-02-04-
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-04T11:27:10Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name2014 ENA Annual Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, U.S.A.en_GB
dc.description2014 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Indiana Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_GB
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