2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/344140
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Poster
Title:
Bedside Handoff; Raising the Standard of Care for Emergency Patients
Author(s):
Rizzo, Sandra
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Sandra Rizzo, MSN, RN, sandra.rizzo@beaumont.edu
Abstract:
Evidence-based Practice Abstract Purpose: Communication failure during handoff has been cited as the most frequent root cause of sentinel events evaluated by the Joint Commission. It is estimated that up to 80% of serious safety events are due to miscommunication during the handoff process. Caregiver handoffs in the emergency department present a special challenge due to the uniqueness of the environment. The purpose of this project is to determine whether the introduction of a bedside handoff process in the emergency department will not only improve patient safety, but will also result in an improvement in patient and staff satisfaction. This project provides guidelines for the development and implementation of a bedside handoff process that is achievable, sustainable, and contributes to high quality patient care. Design: This project is an evidence-based process improvement initiative. Setting: The study was conducted in a 34 bed emergency department, level 3, community teaching hospital with 35,000 annual ED visits. Participants/Subjects: Study participants consisted of clinical staff of approximately 50 RN’s and 25 ED techs. Methods: The concept of the bedside handoff was initially presented to staff as an upcoming initiative at the monthly staff meeting. This was followed by a Power Point presentation describing bedside handoff, as well as an amusing video “starring” the unit managers acting out an example of both a “good” and “bad” handoff. Staff was given additional education on the SBAR (situation, background, assessment, recommendation) method of communication. Over the next several weeks staff was asked to fill out a survey on bedside handoff. Charge nurses were involved in the planning of the roll out. The expectation was that bedside handoff would be performed by each nurse and technician during shift change. To assess staff compliance and the effect of the bedside handoff on patient satisfaction, management conducted rounding on patients and asked a specific set of questions. We are now less than two months into the process. After three months, and again at six months, staff will be given a post implementation survey to assess if their preconceived notions of bedside handoff were validated. Incident reporting of any safety concerns related to communication will be evaluated and compared with any pre-implementation reports. Press Ganey scores will also be tracked both pre and post implementation to determine if there was an improvement in patient satisfaction as evidenced by the answers to three specific questions (nurses took time to listen; nurses attention to your needs; nurses kept you informed). Results/Outcomes: While the initiative is still too new to reveal statistical significance, preliminary findings through staff interviews show that staff is becoming more engaged with the process. Implications: Because the emergency department is inherently a high risk environment, processes need to be in place to help insure the safety of patients. Bedside handoff is one element that has been shown to not only improve safety, but has a positive influence on patient satisfaction.
Keywords:
Bedside Handoff; Standards of Care
Repository Posting Date:
4-Feb-2015
Date of Publication:
4-Feb-2015
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
2014 ENA Annual Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, U.S.A.
Description:
2014 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Indiana Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePosteren_GB
dc.titleBedside Handoff; Raising the Standard of Care for Emergency Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRizzo, Sandraen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsSandra Rizzo, MSN, RN, sandra.rizzo@beaumont.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/344140-
dc.description.abstractEvidence-based Practice Abstract Purpose: Communication failure during handoff has been cited as the most frequent root cause of sentinel events evaluated by the Joint Commission. It is estimated that up to 80% of serious safety events are due to miscommunication during the handoff process. Caregiver handoffs in the emergency department present a special challenge due to the uniqueness of the environment. The purpose of this project is to determine whether the introduction of a bedside handoff process in the emergency department will not only improve patient safety, but will also result in an improvement in patient and staff satisfaction. This project provides guidelines for the development and implementation of a bedside handoff process that is achievable, sustainable, and contributes to high quality patient care. Design: This project is an evidence-based process improvement initiative. Setting: The study was conducted in a 34 bed emergency department, level 3, community teaching hospital with 35,000 annual ED visits. Participants/Subjects: Study participants consisted of clinical staff of approximately 50 RN’s and 25 ED techs. Methods: The concept of the bedside handoff was initially presented to staff as an upcoming initiative at the monthly staff meeting. This was followed by a Power Point presentation describing bedside handoff, as well as an amusing video “starring” the unit managers acting out an example of both a “good” and “bad” handoff. Staff was given additional education on the SBAR (situation, background, assessment, recommendation) method of communication. Over the next several weeks staff was asked to fill out a survey on bedside handoff. Charge nurses were involved in the planning of the roll out. The expectation was that bedside handoff would be performed by each nurse and technician during shift change. To assess staff compliance and the effect of the bedside handoff on patient satisfaction, management conducted rounding on patients and asked a specific set of questions. We are now less than two months into the process. After three months, and again at six months, staff will be given a post implementation survey to assess if their preconceived notions of bedside handoff were validated. Incident reporting of any safety concerns related to communication will be evaluated and compared with any pre-implementation reports. Press Ganey scores will also be tracked both pre and post implementation to determine if there was an improvement in patient satisfaction as evidenced by the answers to three specific questions (nurses took time to listen; nurses attention to your needs; nurses kept you informed). Results/Outcomes: While the initiative is still too new to reveal statistical significance, preliminary findings through staff interviews show that staff is becoming more engaged with the process. Implications: Because the emergency department is inherently a high risk environment, processes need to be in place to help insure the safety of patients. Bedside handoff is one element that has been shown to not only improve safety, but has a positive influence on patient satisfaction.en_GB
dc.subjectBedside Handoffen_GB
dc.subjectStandards of Careen_GB
dc.date.available2015-02-04T11:27:12Z-
dc.date.issued2015-02-04-
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-04T11:27:12Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name2014 ENA Annual Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, U.S.A.en_GB
dc.description2014 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Indiana Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_GB
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