2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/344144
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Poster
Title:
Evaluation of triage accuracy when comparing two triage scaling systems
Author(s):
Malone, Carrie; Grissom, Karen; Helman, Andrea; Magee, Lori; Crouch, Jason
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Carrie Malone, BSN, RN, CEN , carrie.malone@hcahealthcare.com; Karen Grissom, BSN, CEN; Andrea Helman, BSN, RN, CEN, FNE; Lori Magee, MSN, RN, CNOR; Jason Crouch, BSN, RN, CEN, EMT-B
Abstract:
Research Abstract: Purpose: Recognizing the importance of the swift and appropriate triage of patients presenting to the emergency department, this study examined the accuracy of nursing triage decisions utilizing the modified Canadian Triage Acuity Scale (CTAS) as compared to the Emergency Severity Index (ESI) when evaluating emergency department patients, as well as nursing confidence, comfort level, and satisfaction with each triage scaling system. Design: The study design used was a retrospective analysis of data collected in the care of ED patients before and after a transition from CTAS to ESI as the triage scaling system. Setting: This study was performed at a 278 bed rural hospital emergency department in the Midwest which sees approximately 20,000 patients annually. Participants/Subjects: 960 patient charts were chosen from the three months prior to the change from CTAS to ESI, and 960 patient charts from three months after ESI training was completed and the transition made. The choice of patient charts to review was made in random fashion and includes patients of all ages, pediatric and adult, and both male and female. Because of the retrospective nature and purely documentation focus of this project, IRB approval was not deemed necessary in this study. All emergency department nurses were invited to participate in pre and post implementation surveys. Methods: Charts were reviewed in each phase of this study by one or more of the authors considered “expert” in the triage scaling system utilized at the time. The triage nurse’s subjective and objective assessments as well as presenting vital signs were analyzed by the expert nurse, who assigned a triage score to the patient based upon the specific criteria of the triage scaling system. This “expert” score was then compared to the triage nurse’s actual score and the amount of variation, if any, was recorded as over-triage or under-triage. To determine nursing confidence, comfort, and satisfaction with each triage scaling system, a questionnaire was developed on the facility’s Learning Management System and administered to all ED nurses prior to ESI training, as well as several months after ESI triage scaling implementation. Results/Outcomes: Using the modified CTAS scaling system, triage accuracy was documented at 75.63%, with 8.65% of patients over triaged and 15.73% under triaged. After training and implementation of ESI, triage accuracy was documented at 91.77%, with 2.60% of patients over triaged and 6.15% of patients under triaged. This reflects a 16.14% increase in overall accuracy, with a decrease of 6.05% in patients being over triaged, as well as a 5.73% decrease in the number of patients being under triaged. Overall, nurses felt that ESI was better-defined, easier to understand, and more accurate than CTAS. Implications: In this study it was demonstrated that by transitioning from a modified CTAS scaling system to ESI, increased ease of use resulted in greater accuracy in the triaging of emergency patients.
Keywords:
Triage Accuracy
Repository Posting Date:
4-Feb-2015
Date of Publication:
4-Feb-2015
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
2014 ENA Annual Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, U.S.A.
Description:
2014 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Indiana Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePosteren_GB
dc.titleEvaluation of triage accuracy when comparing two triage scaling systemsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMalone, Carrieen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGrissom, Karenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHelman, Andreaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMagee, Lorien_GB
dc.contributor.authorCrouch, Jasonen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsCarrie Malone, BSN, RN, CEN , carrie.malone@hcahealthcare.com; Karen Grissom, BSN, CEN; Andrea Helman, BSN, RN, CEN, FNE; Lori Magee, MSN, RN, CNOR; Jason Crouch, BSN, RN, CEN, EMT-Ben_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/344144-
dc.description.abstractResearch Abstract: Purpose: Recognizing the importance of the swift and appropriate triage of patients presenting to the emergency department, this study examined the accuracy of nursing triage decisions utilizing the modified Canadian Triage Acuity Scale (CTAS) as compared to the Emergency Severity Index (ESI) when evaluating emergency department patients, as well as nursing confidence, comfort level, and satisfaction with each triage scaling system. Design: The study design used was a retrospective analysis of data collected in the care of ED patients before and after a transition from CTAS to ESI as the triage scaling system. Setting: This study was performed at a 278 bed rural hospital emergency department in the Midwest which sees approximately 20,000 patients annually. Participants/Subjects: 960 patient charts were chosen from the three months prior to the change from CTAS to ESI, and 960 patient charts from three months after ESI training was completed and the transition made. The choice of patient charts to review was made in random fashion and includes patients of all ages, pediatric and adult, and both male and female. Because of the retrospective nature and purely documentation focus of this project, IRB approval was not deemed necessary in this study. All emergency department nurses were invited to participate in pre and post implementation surveys. Methods: Charts were reviewed in each phase of this study by one or more of the authors considered “expert” in the triage scaling system utilized at the time. The triage nurse’s subjective and objective assessments as well as presenting vital signs were analyzed by the expert nurse, who assigned a triage score to the patient based upon the specific criteria of the triage scaling system. This “expert” score was then compared to the triage nurse’s actual score and the amount of variation, if any, was recorded as over-triage or under-triage. To determine nursing confidence, comfort, and satisfaction with each triage scaling system, a questionnaire was developed on the facility’s Learning Management System and administered to all ED nurses prior to ESI training, as well as several months after ESI triage scaling implementation. Results/Outcomes: Using the modified CTAS scaling system, triage accuracy was documented at 75.63%, with 8.65% of patients over triaged and 15.73% under triaged. After training and implementation of ESI, triage accuracy was documented at 91.77%, with 2.60% of patients over triaged and 6.15% of patients under triaged. This reflects a 16.14% increase in overall accuracy, with a decrease of 6.05% in patients being over triaged, as well as a 5.73% decrease in the number of patients being under triaged. Overall, nurses felt that ESI was better-defined, easier to understand, and more accurate than CTAS. Implications: In this study it was demonstrated that by transitioning from a modified CTAS scaling system to ESI, increased ease of use resulted in greater accuracy in the triaging of emergency patients.en_GB
dc.subjectTriage Accuracyen_GB
dc.date.available2015-02-04T11:27:16Z-
dc.date.issued2015-02-04-
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-04T11:27:16Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name2014 ENA Annual Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, U.S.A.en_GB
dc.description2014 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Indiana Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_GB
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