2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/344153
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Poster
Title:
Innovative Ways to Care - When Language Barriers are Present
Author(s):
Pfieffer, Jennifer; Cavara, Teresa; Johnson, Elizabeth; Flathers, Kristina; Perkel, Dale; Plummer, Barbara
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Jennifer Pfieffer, MSN, RN, PCNS-BC, CPEN, jennyerin19793@yahoo.com; Teresa Cavara, BSN, RN, CCRN; Elizabeth Johnson, MSN, APRN, PCNS-BC, CPEN; Kristina Flathers, MLIS; Dale Perkel, BA, MSW, LCSW; Barbara Plummer, MBA/HCA, BSN, RN, CPON
Abstract:
Evidence-based Practice Abstract Purpose: Communication and building a rapport with those who do not speak English can be difficult for patients, families, and Health Care Providers (HCP) in the Emergency Department (ED). In this ED, telephonic language services are available 24/7, however in person interpreters are limited. A survey of HCP and families revealed dissatisfaction with the current language services offered. The goal of this project is to trial new innovations to improve communication with patients and families when a language barrier is present. Design: This project used iPads to trial two different applications (Apps) in an effort to improve communication. The first App is an electronic speech translation service called iTranslate, which recognizes typed or spoken English words. It then translates, types and speaks in the non-English language. The intent for iTranslate was for dialogue on basic care and comfort needs, not medical interpretation. The second App is called On Demand Interpretation (ODI). It connects the patient/family with a live interpreter through video. ODI captures both verbal and nonverbal communications. Setting: The hospital is a tertiary, freestanding suburban pediatric teaching hospital in the Northeastern U.S. with 54,000 visits/year. Participants/Subjects: Participants included Spanish speaking ED patients/family members and the HCP caring for them. Methods: Superusers were identified and given extensive education on both Apps. Algorithms were created to guide the HCP on the most appropriate App to use to ensure that the communication tools were used safely and effectively. iTranslate was trialed for thirty days. The length of the ODI trial was based on grant funded minutes. After each use, HCPs and families were surveyed to measure satisfaction and ease of use. The five question survey used a Likert- scale rating system. Surveys were available in Spanish and were read to those with limited literacy. Results/Outcomes: iTranslate: Both HCP and patients/families expressed dissatisfaction with this App. It could only support yes/no questions and the interpretation was not always reliable. ODI Video: Families and HCPs have positively responded regarding the use of ODI. The availability of a live person is preferred. Families who have used the service are now requesting it on subsequent visits. The biggest challenge is that iPads are difficult to hear in noisy areas. Implications: Hands down, the ODI is the closest to a live interpreter and the preferred method of communication for our team. The use of ODI facilitated establishing a rapport and helped put our families at ease. It allows us to provide safe and equitable care, and improve communication, compliance and overall outcomes for those with language barriers. While current literature that states that patients/families are more concerned that a form of interpretation is offered as opposed to the form of interpretation that is utilized, our study found when offered multiple tools, there is a preference for video interpretation. While in person interpretation service by a certified interpreter is currently the gold standard, it is not achievable by many heathcare institutions. Current and future technology can bring the certified interpreter to the bedside 24/7/365.
Keywords:
Innovative Caring; Language Barriers; Carring with Language Barriers
Repository Posting Date:
4-Feb-2015
Date of Publication:
4-Feb-2015
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
2014 ENA Annual Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, U.S.A.
Description:
2014 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Indiana Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePosteren_GB
dc.titleInnovative Ways to Care - When Language Barriers are Presenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorPfieffer, Jenniferen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCavara, Teresaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Elizabethen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFlathers, Kristinaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPerkel, Daleen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPlummer, Barbaraen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsJennifer Pfieffer, MSN, RN, PCNS-BC, CPEN, jennyerin19793@yahoo.com; Teresa Cavara, BSN, RN, CCRN; Elizabeth Johnson, MSN, APRN, PCNS-BC, CPEN; Kristina Flathers, MLIS; Dale Perkel, BA, MSW, LCSW; Barbara Plummer, MBA/HCA, BSN, RN, CPONen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/344153-
dc.description.abstractEvidence-based Practice Abstract Purpose: Communication and building a rapport with those who do not speak English can be difficult for patients, families, and Health Care Providers (HCP) in the Emergency Department (ED). In this ED, telephonic language services are available 24/7, however in person interpreters are limited. A survey of HCP and families revealed dissatisfaction with the current language services offered. The goal of this project is to trial new innovations to improve communication with patients and families when a language barrier is present. Design: This project used iPads to trial two different applications (Apps) in an effort to improve communication. The first App is an electronic speech translation service called iTranslate, which recognizes typed or spoken English words. It then translates, types and speaks in the non-English language. The intent for iTranslate was for dialogue on basic care and comfort needs, not medical interpretation. The second App is called On Demand Interpretation (ODI). It connects the patient/family with a live interpreter through video. ODI captures both verbal and nonverbal communications. Setting: The hospital is a tertiary, freestanding suburban pediatric teaching hospital in the Northeastern U.S. with 54,000 visits/year. Participants/Subjects: Participants included Spanish speaking ED patients/family members and the HCP caring for them. Methods: Superusers were identified and given extensive education on both Apps. Algorithms were created to guide the HCP on the most appropriate App to use to ensure that the communication tools were used safely and effectively. iTranslate was trialed for thirty days. The length of the ODI trial was based on grant funded minutes. After each use, HCPs and families were surveyed to measure satisfaction and ease of use. The five question survey used a Likert- scale rating system. Surveys were available in Spanish and were read to those with limited literacy. Results/Outcomes: iTranslate: Both HCP and patients/families expressed dissatisfaction with this App. It could only support yes/no questions and the interpretation was not always reliable. ODI Video: Families and HCPs have positively responded regarding the use of ODI. The availability of a live person is preferred. Families who have used the service are now requesting it on subsequent visits. The biggest challenge is that iPads are difficult to hear in noisy areas. Implications: Hands down, the ODI is the closest to a live interpreter and the preferred method of communication for our team. The use of ODI facilitated establishing a rapport and helped put our families at ease. It allows us to provide safe and equitable care, and improve communication, compliance and overall outcomes for those with language barriers. While current literature that states that patients/families are more concerned that a form of interpretation is offered as opposed to the form of interpretation that is utilized, our study found when offered multiple tools, there is a preference for video interpretation. While in person interpretation service by a certified interpreter is currently the gold standard, it is not achievable by many heathcare institutions. Current and future technology can bring the certified interpreter to the bedside 24/7/365.en_GB
dc.subjectInnovative Caringen_GB
dc.subjectLanguage Barriersen_GB
dc.subjectCarring with Language Barriersen_GB
dc.date.available2015-02-04T11:27:27Z-
dc.date.issued2015-02-04-
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-04T11:27:27Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name2014 ENA Annual Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, U.S.A.en_GB
dc.description2014 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Indiana Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_GB
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