2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/344155
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Poster
Title:
Clinician Perceived Barriers to Conducting Nursing Research
Author(s):
McMahon, Margaret
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Margaret McMahon, MN, RN, APN, CEN, NP-C, FAEN, PeggyMcMahon@cs.com
Abstract:
Research Abstract: Purpose: The number of Nursing Research studies conducted by our Nursing staff was quite small, and the reasons were unknown. The presence of a strong Nursing Research program was important to support evidence-based practice, as well as meet the research requirements for Magnet designation. In order to implement strategies to strengthen our program, we felt it necessary to identify what elements of the research process were perceived as barriers by nursing clinicians. The purposes of the study were to 1) identify factors affecting nurse engagement in nursing research; and 2) increase clinician knowledge of the research process by having them conducting a nursing research study. Design: The study design was non-experimental, cross sectional, utilizing a convenience sample of nursing personnel employed in our institution in a variety of clinical settings who completed a Barriers to Nursing Research. The study was approved by the Nursing Research Council and the Institutional Review Board. Setting: The setting was a multifacility urban and suburban healthcare system with two acute care hospitals, three Emergency Departments and fifteen ambulatory care settings. Participants/Subjects: The subjects were nursing staff employed full time, part time or per diem status in all clinical services. Five hundred and eighteen (518) individuals participated in the study, for a response rate of 43%. Ninety six percent (96%) of the respondents were female, middle aged (average of 45years) staff nurses (80%). Nearly half of the participants were educated at the baccalaureate level. Sixty three percent (63%) were participating in the Clinical Ladder. Methods: The study instrument used was the Nurses' Barriers to Research Utilization Scale (Nurses' Research KAP Survey) which addressed knowledge, willingness to engage and ability to perform various elements of the research process. Twelve (12) demographic questions were added as well. Participants completed the study on-line or paper/pencil format. The study period was one month. Participation was voluntary and anonymous. Credit for the Clinical Ladder was provided. Results/Outcomes: KAP scores below 1.66 are consider low, those in the range of 1.67 - 2.33 are moderate, and 2.4-3.0 is high. None of the scores in our study was above 1.93. The lowest score was 1.30. Moderate scores were noted for: selecting outcomes to be achieved when changing practice based on research, determining if there is a sufficient research base for practice change, designing research based practice interventions, formulating research questions, getting administrative support for a research study, data analysis, and verbally presenting study findings. Administrative processes, such as completing an IRB application, funding, and writing a research article for publication scored the lowest. The higher the educational level, the higher the KAP scores. Interestingly, the longer the nursing career, the lower the KAP scores. Implications: The major implications are the need for more education on the research process, continued institutional support for advanced nursing education, and administrative support for activities related to the processes such as the IRB, sources of funding and writing for publication.
Keywords:
Nursing Research Barriers
Repository Posting Date:
4-Feb-2015
Date of Publication:
4-Feb-2015
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
2014 ENA Annual Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, U.S.A.
Description:
2014 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Indiana Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePosteren_GB
dc.titleClinician Perceived Barriers to Conducting Nursing Researchen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcMahon, Margareten_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsMargaret McMahon, MN, RN, APN, CEN, NP-C, FAEN, PeggyMcMahon@cs.comen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/344155-
dc.description.abstractResearch Abstract: Purpose: The number of Nursing Research studies conducted by our Nursing staff was quite small, and the reasons were unknown. The presence of a strong Nursing Research program was important to support evidence-based practice, as well as meet the research requirements for Magnet designation. In order to implement strategies to strengthen our program, we felt it necessary to identify what elements of the research process were perceived as barriers by nursing clinicians. The purposes of the study were to 1) identify factors affecting nurse engagement in nursing research; and 2) increase clinician knowledge of the research process by having them conducting a nursing research study. Design: The study design was non-experimental, cross sectional, utilizing a convenience sample of nursing personnel employed in our institution in a variety of clinical settings who completed a Barriers to Nursing Research. The study was approved by the Nursing Research Council and the Institutional Review Board. Setting: The setting was a multifacility urban and suburban healthcare system with two acute care hospitals, three Emergency Departments and fifteen ambulatory care settings. Participants/Subjects: The subjects were nursing staff employed full time, part time or per diem status in all clinical services. Five hundred and eighteen (518) individuals participated in the study, for a response rate of 43%. Ninety six percent (96%) of the respondents were female, middle aged (average of 45years) staff nurses (80%). Nearly half of the participants were educated at the baccalaureate level. Sixty three percent (63%) were participating in the Clinical Ladder. Methods: The study instrument used was the Nurses' Barriers to Research Utilization Scale (Nurses' Research KAP Survey) which addressed knowledge, willingness to engage and ability to perform various elements of the research process. Twelve (12) demographic questions were added as well. Participants completed the study on-line or paper/pencil format. The study period was one month. Participation was voluntary and anonymous. Credit for the Clinical Ladder was provided. Results/Outcomes: KAP scores below 1.66 are consider low, those in the range of 1.67 - 2.33 are moderate, and 2.4-3.0 is high. None of the scores in our study was above 1.93. The lowest score was 1.30. Moderate scores were noted for: selecting outcomes to be achieved when changing practice based on research, determining if there is a sufficient research base for practice change, designing research based practice interventions, formulating research questions, getting administrative support for a research study, data analysis, and verbally presenting study findings. Administrative processes, such as completing an IRB application, funding, and writing a research article for publication scored the lowest. The higher the educational level, the higher the KAP scores. Interestingly, the longer the nursing career, the lower the KAP scores. Implications: The major implications are the need for more education on the research process, continued institutional support for advanced nursing education, and administrative support for activities related to the processes such as the IRB, sources of funding and writing for publication.en_GB
dc.subjectNursing Research Barriersen_GB
dc.date.available2015-02-04T11:27:29Z-
dc.date.issued2015-02-04-
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-04T11:27:29Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name2014 ENA Annual Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, U.S.A.en_GB
dc.description2014 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Indiana Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_GB
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