2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/344156
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Poster
Title:
Operation Zero Fury: Decreasing Lateral Violence in Nursing
Author(s):
Rose, Jenael; Linzey, David
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Jenael Rose, BSN, RN, j1rose@sbch.org; David Linzey, BSN, RN
Abstract:
Evidence-based Practice Abstract Purpose: Nursing frustration was increasing as patient transfers from the Emergency Department (ED) to other nursing units were delayed and interactions during phone report were becoming hostile. Concern arose that this had the potential to affect the completeness and safety of patient handoffs. Operation Zero Fury (OZF) was created to facilitate open lines of communication between departments to increase nursing collaboration and job satisfaction and to preserve patient safety during handoff. Design: Operation Zero Fury is a staff development campaign created by the ED Shared Governance Committee (ED SG) that focused on decreasing lateral violence by facilitating collaboration between nursing units and providing staff members with tools to assist with conflict resolution. Setting: This campaign was conducted in an urban 483-bed, Level II Trauma Center. Participants/Subjects: Participants in this campaign were patient-care staff members (Registered Nurses, Emergency Medical Technicians, Certified Nursing Assistants) in the Emergency Department; Medical/Surgical/Telemetry Units; Labor and Delivery; Pediatrics; and Surgical, Medical and Pediatric ICUs. Methods: This process started with a literature review on the topic of Lateral Violence in Nursing. That information was presented at an ED staff meeting to introduce the topic and promote individual self-reflection. Modules were then created around specific topics to facilitate conflict resolution. Each module was introduced at an ED staff meeting with illustrative videos and narrative examples. Neon-colored flyers and email reminders with helpful hints were used to reinforce main points. The first module was titled, “Empower the Individual” and focused on encouraging staff members to work out their differences. The second module was titled, “Equip the Individual” and included specific tools to help staff members resolve conflict. The ED SG also met with the SG committees of the above-mentioned inpatient units. OZF was presented to each group as a way of extending an olive branch and agreeing that the units needed to work together in a more respectful and professional manner. Each floor provided a liaison that would report regularly to a corresponding ED liaison to facilitate the resolution of future issues. The OZF modules were then distributed through this network so that SG floor committees could share the information with their staff. Results/Outcomes: ED SG is currently gathering data via a staff survey to measure nursing frustration levels and perceived safety of patient handoffs. Initial data indicates that ED staff rate teamwork and the respect of coworkers as strengths instead of weaknesses since the implementation of OZF. A complete breakdown of this data will be available by the time the poster is presented. Implications: A shared understanding of individual departments’ workloads and goals fosters professional, collaborative nursing interactions. Decreased hostility increases job satisfaction. Preventing conflicts decreases distractions that could potentially result in unsafe or incomplete patient handoffs.
Keywords:
Lateral Violence in Nursing; Nursing Violence
Repository Posting Date:
4-Feb-2015
Date of Publication:
4-Feb-2015
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
2014 ENA Annual Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, U.S.A.
Description:
2014 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Indiana Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePosteren_GB
dc.titleOperation Zero Fury: Decreasing Lateral Violence in Nursingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRose, Jenaelen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLinzey, Daviden_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsJenael Rose, BSN, RN, j1rose@sbch.org; David Linzey, BSN, RNen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/344156-
dc.description.abstractEvidence-based Practice Abstract Purpose: Nursing frustration was increasing as patient transfers from the Emergency Department (ED) to other nursing units were delayed and interactions during phone report were becoming hostile. Concern arose that this had the potential to affect the completeness and safety of patient handoffs. Operation Zero Fury (OZF) was created to facilitate open lines of communication between departments to increase nursing collaboration and job satisfaction and to preserve patient safety during handoff. Design: Operation Zero Fury is a staff development campaign created by the ED Shared Governance Committee (ED SG) that focused on decreasing lateral violence by facilitating collaboration between nursing units and providing staff members with tools to assist with conflict resolution. Setting: This campaign was conducted in an urban 483-bed, Level II Trauma Center. Participants/Subjects: Participants in this campaign were patient-care staff members (Registered Nurses, Emergency Medical Technicians, Certified Nursing Assistants) in the Emergency Department; Medical/Surgical/Telemetry Units; Labor and Delivery; Pediatrics; and Surgical, Medical and Pediatric ICUs. Methods: This process started with a literature review on the topic of Lateral Violence in Nursing. That information was presented at an ED staff meeting to introduce the topic and promote individual self-reflection. Modules were then created around specific topics to facilitate conflict resolution. Each module was introduced at an ED staff meeting with illustrative videos and narrative examples. Neon-colored flyers and email reminders with helpful hints were used to reinforce main points. The first module was titled, “Empower the Individual” and focused on encouraging staff members to work out their differences. The second module was titled, “Equip the Individual” and included specific tools to help staff members resolve conflict. The ED SG also met with the SG committees of the above-mentioned inpatient units. OZF was presented to each group as a way of extending an olive branch and agreeing that the units needed to work together in a more respectful and professional manner. Each floor provided a liaison that would report regularly to a corresponding ED liaison to facilitate the resolution of future issues. The OZF modules were then distributed through this network so that SG floor committees could share the information with their staff. Results/Outcomes: ED SG is currently gathering data via a staff survey to measure nursing frustration levels and perceived safety of patient handoffs. Initial data indicates that ED staff rate teamwork and the respect of coworkers as strengths instead of weaknesses since the implementation of OZF. A complete breakdown of this data will be available by the time the poster is presented. Implications: A shared understanding of individual departments’ workloads and goals fosters professional, collaborative nursing interactions. Decreased hostility increases job satisfaction. Preventing conflicts decreases distractions that could potentially result in unsafe or incomplete patient handoffs.en_GB
dc.subjectLateral Violence in Nursingen_GB
dc.subjectNursing Violenceen_GB
dc.date.available2015-02-04T11:27:30Z-
dc.date.issued2015-02-04-
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-04T11:27:30Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name2014 ENA Annual Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, U.S.A.en_GB
dc.description2014 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Indiana Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_GB
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