2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/344162
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Poster
Title:
When Technology Hinders Patient Flow and Satisfaction
Author(s):
Roenfeld, Barbara; Achenbach,Jennifer; Vacha, Bernadette
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Barbara Roenfeld, BSN, RN, NE-BC, Barbara.Roenfeld@Alegent.org; Jennifer Achenbach, MSN, RN, CEN, FNP-BC; Bernadette Vacha, MSN, ACNS-BC, APRN-CNS
Abstract:
Evidence-based Practice Abstract Purpose: The purpose of the poster presentation is to exhibit a rapid quality improvement project that involved discontinuing the usage of an electronic bed system and reinstituting a process of direct nurse to nurse communication. The poster will highlight improved outcomes that resulted from the project. Design: This evidence-based project was designed as a rapid cycle quality improvement initiative including direct care nurses. Setting: The project took place in a community, 178 licensed bed acute care hospital with a level III trauma center. Participants/Subjects: The initiative monitored patient outcomes for all patients admitted from the Emergency Department. Methods: January 2011, an electronic bed management system was implemented. The new process of bed assignment became more complex. First, the nurse would be notified of receiving a patient. At the nurse’s convenience, she would log into a computer and assign a bed based on limited information. Transferring staff periodically checked the bed system to review the bed status. This process was mainly nurse focused and was dependent on the nurse’s needs. Staff expressed concerns about the bed system immediately. After several months, leadership assessed the effectiveness of the system by analyzing data and conducting an employee survey. The survey revealed staff felt vital information was being lost while transferring patients. A decision was made to return to the previous method by the end of 2011. The final process involved Charge Nurses directly collaborating to make bed assignments based on patient needs. The process became patient centered once again. Results/Outcomes: Time from admit order to inpatient assignment reduced from 10.9 to 2.2 minutes. Time from admit order to leaving the Emergency Department decreased from 94.1 to 38.2 minutes. Length of stay in the ED decreased 175 to 152 minutes, below the 261 national benchmark. Patient satisfaction improved from 46% to above the 90% national percentile in the HealthStream Database. Implications: Utilizing technology to improve patient care is a current healthcare trend. Using technology does not guarantee improved outcomes. Leadership should carefully consider process before implementing new technologies. The patient should always remain at the center of the healthcare workflow.
Keywords:
Electronic Bed System; Patient Flow and Technology; Patient Satisfaction and Technology
Repository Posting Date:
4-Feb-2015
Date of Publication:
4-Feb-2015
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
2014 ENA Annual Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, U.S.A.
Description:
2014 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Indiana Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePosteren_GB
dc.titleWhen Technology Hinders Patient Flow and Satisfactionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRoenfeld, Barbaraen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAchenbach,Jenniferen_GB
dc.contributor.authorVacha, Bernadetteen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsBarbara Roenfeld, BSN, RN, NE-BC, Barbara.Roenfeld@Alegent.org; Jennifer Achenbach, MSN, RN, CEN, FNP-BC; Bernadette Vacha, MSN, ACNS-BC, APRN-CNSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/344162-
dc.description.abstractEvidence-based Practice Abstract Purpose: The purpose of the poster presentation is to exhibit a rapid quality improvement project that involved discontinuing the usage of an electronic bed system and reinstituting a process of direct nurse to nurse communication. The poster will highlight improved outcomes that resulted from the project. Design: This evidence-based project was designed as a rapid cycle quality improvement initiative including direct care nurses. Setting: The project took place in a community, 178 licensed bed acute care hospital with a level III trauma center. Participants/Subjects: The initiative monitored patient outcomes for all patients admitted from the Emergency Department. Methods: January 2011, an electronic bed management system was implemented. The new process of bed assignment became more complex. First, the nurse would be notified of receiving a patient. At the nurse’s convenience, she would log into a computer and assign a bed based on limited information. Transferring staff periodically checked the bed system to review the bed status. This process was mainly nurse focused and was dependent on the nurse’s needs. Staff expressed concerns about the bed system immediately. After several months, leadership assessed the effectiveness of the system by analyzing data and conducting an employee survey. The survey revealed staff felt vital information was being lost while transferring patients. A decision was made to return to the previous method by the end of 2011. The final process involved Charge Nurses directly collaborating to make bed assignments based on patient needs. The process became patient centered once again. Results/Outcomes: Time from admit order to inpatient assignment reduced from 10.9 to 2.2 minutes. Time from admit order to leaving the Emergency Department decreased from 94.1 to 38.2 minutes. Length of stay in the ED decreased 175 to 152 minutes, below the 261 national benchmark. Patient satisfaction improved from 46% to above the 90% national percentile in the HealthStream Database. Implications: Utilizing technology to improve patient care is a current healthcare trend. Using technology does not guarantee improved outcomes. Leadership should carefully consider process before implementing new technologies. The patient should always remain at the center of the healthcare workflow.en_GB
dc.subjectElectronic Bed Systemen_GB
dc.subjectPatient Flow and Technologyen_GB
dc.subjectPatient Satisfaction and Technologyen_GB
dc.date.available2015-02-04T11:27:36Z-
dc.date.issued2015-02-04-
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-04T11:27:36Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name2014 ENA Annual Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, U.S.A.en_GB
dc.description2014 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Indiana Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_GB
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