2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/344163
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Poster
Title:
Professional Development and Competency Assessment for the Emergency Nurse
Author(s):
Wilson, Jennifer; Shumaker, Brooke; Lones, Malachi
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Jennifer Wilson, BSN, RN, CEN, jenwilso@stormontvail.org; Brooke Shumaker, MSN, RN, CNL-C; Malachi Lones, BSN, RN, CEN, CPEN
Abstract:
Evidence-based Practice Abstract Purpose: The purpose of this project is to demonstrate the implementation of the Benner Stages of RN Clinical Competence in an emergency department setting. The purpose of the Benner Levels is to provide “excellent caring practices” while the desired outcome is to provide goals, increase moral, increase retention, increase recognition, increase reward, and improve clinical expertise, critical thinking and development. The end requirement for completion of the five Benner proficiency levels is to obtain the CEN®. Design: The Dreyfus model, which the Benner Levels are based, states in the acquisition and development of a skill, a student passes through five levels of proficiency: novice, advanced beginner, competent, proficient, and expert. These different levels reflect changes in three general aspects of skilled performance: One is movement from reliance on abstract principles to the use of past concrete experience as paradigms. The second is a change in the learner's perception of the situation, and is seen less as a compilation of equally relevant parts, and more as a complete whole in which only certain parts are relevant. The third is a passage from detached observation to involved performer. Setting: An Emergency Department built in 2009 for a maximum annual capacity of 50,000 patients (current annual census of over 63,000 patients). The department is a Level II Trauma Center. The organization is Chest Pain level IV, a Primary Stroke Center and is designated Magnet facility. Participants/Subjects: 100 Registered Nurses in Emergency and trauma. Methods: RNs are provided 5 high-level critical thinking courses. The areas evaluated are coursework, advanced assessments, various skills, and interdisciplinary collaborations that involve observational experiences. The formats used for assessing these areas are skill check offs for demonstration of clinical skills, verification of completion of course work, verification of caring for patients in each advanced assessment category, and viewing informational videos. The expectation is that each RN will move through the levels of proficiency to demonstrate their specific level of competence each year. Each RN moves through the levels with the end goal and expectation of obtaining Certified Emergency Nurse (CEN) certification to be deemed an Expert Emergency Nurse. In order to meet the requirements each year the RN will need to demonstrate and/or perform specific annual competencies. Results/Outcomes: Infrastructure was established to increase competence in nursing skills, decrease turnover, increase job satisfaction, and facilitate the delivery of the best patient care, while strengthening clinical expertise, critical thinking, organization skills and professional development. Over 15 ED RNs have obtained their CEN® and since the recent implementation of the Benner Proficiency Levels, we have had another nurse obtain the CEN®, one has scheduled a test date and several more are obtaining study materials for the exam. Implications: It is imperative that managers support the goal to promote professional development and growth by providing employees resources to be successful. Encouraging and supporting Benner Proficiency promotes RNs to become certified, promotes professionalism and ensures that certified nurses have the knowledge necessary to provide the highest quality.
Keywords:
Professional Development; Competency Assessment
Repository Posting Date:
4-Feb-2015
Date of Publication:
4-Feb-2015
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
2014 ENA Annual Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, U.S.A.
Description:
2014 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Indiana Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePosteren_GB
dc.titleProfessional Development and Competency Assessment for the Emergency Nurseen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Jenniferen_GB
dc.contributor.authorShumaker, Brookeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLones, Malachien_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsJennifer Wilson, BSN, RN, CEN, jenwilso@stormontvail.org; Brooke Shumaker, MSN, RN, CNL-C; Malachi Lones, BSN, RN, CEN, CPENen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/344163-
dc.description.abstractEvidence-based Practice Abstract Purpose: The purpose of this project is to demonstrate the implementation of the Benner Stages of RN Clinical Competence in an emergency department setting. The purpose of the Benner Levels is to provide “excellent caring practices” while the desired outcome is to provide goals, increase moral, increase retention, increase recognition, increase reward, and improve clinical expertise, critical thinking and development. The end requirement for completion of the five Benner proficiency levels is to obtain the CEN®. Design: The Dreyfus model, which the Benner Levels are based, states in the acquisition and development of a skill, a student passes through five levels of proficiency: novice, advanced beginner, competent, proficient, and expert. These different levels reflect changes in three general aspects of skilled performance: One is movement from reliance on abstract principles to the use of past concrete experience as paradigms. The second is a change in the learner's perception of the situation, and is seen less as a compilation of equally relevant parts, and more as a complete whole in which only certain parts are relevant. The third is a passage from detached observation to involved performer. Setting: An Emergency Department built in 2009 for a maximum annual capacity of 50,000 patients (current annual census of over 63,000 patients). The department is a Level II Trauma Center. The organization is Chest Pain level IV, a Primary Stroke Center and is designated Magnet facility. Participants/Subjects: 100 Registered Nurses in Emergency and trauma. Methods: RNs are provided 5 high-level critical thinking courses. The areas evaluated are coursework, advanced assessments, various skills, and interdisciplinary collaborations that involve observational experiences. The formats used for assessing these areas are skill check offs for demonstration of clinical skills, verification of completion of course work, verification of caring for patients in each advanced assessment category, and viewing informational videos. The expectation is that each RN will move through the levels of proficiency to demonstrate their specific level of competence each year. Each RN moves through the levels with the end goal and expectation of obtaining Certified Emergency Nurse (CEN) certification to be deemed an Expert Emergency Nurse. In order to meet the requirements each year the RN will need to demonstrate and/or perform specific annual competencies. Results/Outcomes: Infrastructure was established to increase competence in nursing skills, decrease turnover, increase job satisfaction, and facilitate the delivery of the best patient care, while strengthening clinical expertise, critical thinking, organization skills and professional development. Over 15 ED RNs have obtained their CEN® and since the recent implementation of the Benner Proficiency Levels, we have had another nurse obtain the CEN®, one has scheduled a test date and several more are obtaining study materials for the exam. Implications: It is imperative that managers support the goal to promote professional development and growth by providing employees resources to be successful. Encouraging and supporting Benner Proficiency promotes RNs to become certified, promotes professionalism and ensures that certified nurses have the knowledge necessary to provide the highest quality.en_GB
dc.subjectProfessional Developmenten_GB
dc.subjectCompetency Assessmenten_GB
dc.date.available2015-02-04T11:27:37Z-
dc.date.issued2015-02-04-
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-04T11:27:37Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name2014 ENA Annual Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, U.S.A.en_GB
dc.description2014 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Indiana Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_GB
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