2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/344172
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Poster
Title:
Reducing Blood Culture Contamination by Educational Intervention
Author(s):
Bixby, Mary
Author Details:
Mary Bixby, BSN, RN, Mary_Bixby@ssmhc.com
Abstract:
Evidence-based Practice Abstract Purpose: Contaminated blood cultures impact hospital cost,increase workload ,prolong hospital stay and with the use of broad spectrum antibiotics can result in antibiotic resistance and patient mortality. Therefore with knowledge in truly understanding the importance of obtaining non contaminated blood cultures and following hospital policy reduction of blood culture contamination will result. Design: With this evidence based practice project quality assurance was implemented. Setting: The project was conducted in a Pediatric Level I Emergency Department in an urban setting. This ED sees over 48,000 patients annually. Participants/Subjects: All participants were pediatric ED patients that ranged in age from birth to 21 years of age.Mean age was 2. 5 years of age. 1200 participants were included in the year long study. Blood cultures obtained peripherally and per line draws were evaluated.No restrictions with past medical history. Methods: The introduction of educating staff on the uniform practice in obtaining blood cultures began with a mandatory review of current hospital policy. After review all signed a sheet that confirmed a review in policy had occurred . A two month 2 team approach obtaining blood cultures occurred on every blood culture drawn in the ED. A survey which was developed using key points from hospital policy was completed by the observer on the RN who obtained the specimen in real time. The completed surveys were collected and analyzed by the QI Coordinator. This information was shared at staff meetings. One on one communication was done with staff that resulted in a contamination. Results/Outcomes: The blood contamination rate reduced from a 7% high to 1%rate. The month immediately following completion of the 2 month survey was0%!!! Outcomes of the study resulted in eliminating needles to transfer blood into the bottles. Transfer devices are used on all patients . Chloraprep scrub is uniform for 30 seconds with additional 30 second dry time. A practice not all were following prior to the study. Transfer of blood is to culture bottles prepped with alcohol. Best practice with compliance of policy is the standard. Implications: Significant reduction has resulted with blood culture contamination rate. The last quarter of 2013 resulted in 0.8% rate. Well below the 2% national average. Cost savings to the institution are estimated to be $3000 savings per each blood culture that does not result in a false positive. The two team approach has been embraced by staff and a survey is completed on every patient to date. On going one on one conversations occur with cultures that result in contamination. The focus on awareness of following policy and being uniform with collection has led our ED into further investigative studies.
Keywords:
Blood Culture Contamination; Reducing Blood Culture Contamination
Repository Posting Date:
4-Feb-2015
Date of Publication:
4-Feb-2015
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
2014 ENA Annual Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, U.S.A.
Description:
2014 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Indiana Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePosteren_GB
dc.titleReducing Blood Culture Contamination by Educational Interventionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBixby, Maryen_GB
dc.author.detailsMary Bixby, BSN, RN, Mary_Bixby@ssmhc.comen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/344172-
dc.description.abstractEvidence-based Practice Abstract Purpose: Contaminated blood cultures impact hospital cost,increase workload ,prolong hospital stay and with the use of broad spectrum antibiotics can result in antibiotic resistance and patient mortality. Therefore with knowledge in truly understanding the importance of obtaining non contaminated blood cultures and following hospital policy reduction of blood culture contamination will result. Design: With this evidence based practice project quality assurance was implemented. Setting: The project was conducted in a Pediatric Level I Emergency Department in an urban setting. This ED sees over 48,000 patients annually. Participants/Subjects: All participants were pediatric ED patients that ranged in age from birth to 21 years of age.Mean age was 2. 5 years of age. 1200 participants were included in the year long study. Blood cultures obtained peripherally and per line draws were evaluated.No restrictions with past medical history. Methods: The introduction of educating staff on the uniform practice in obtaining blood cultures began with a mandatory review of current hospital policy. After review all signed a sheet that confirmed a review in policy had occurred . A two month 2 team approach obtaining blood cultures occurred on every blood culture drawn in the ED. A survey which was developed using key points from hospital policy was completed by the observer on the RN who obtained the specimen in real time. The completed surveys were collected and analyzed by the QI Coordinator. This information was shared at staff meetings. One on one communication was done with staff that resulted in a contamination. Results/Outcomes: The blood contamination rate reduced from a 7% high to 1%rate. The month immediately following completion of the 2 month survey was0%!!! Outcomes of the study resulted in eliminating needles to transfer blood into the bottles. Transfer devices are used on all patients . Chloraprep scrub is uniform for 30 seconds with additional 30 second dry time. A practice not all were following prior to the study. Transfer of blood is to culture bottles prepped with alcohol. Best practice with compliance of policy is the standard. Implications: Significant reduction has resulted with blood culture contamination rate. The last quarter of 2013 resulted in 0.8% rate. Well below the 2% national average. Cost savings to the institution are estimated to be $3000 savings per each blood culture that does not result in a false positive. The two team approach has been embraced by staff and a survey is completed on every patient to date. On going one on one conversations occur with cultures that result in contamination. The focus on awareness of following policy and being uniform with collection has led our ED into further investigative studies.en_GB
dc.subjectBlood Culture Contaminationen_GB
dc.subjectReducing Blood Culture Contaminationen_GB
dc.date.available2015-02-04T11:27:46Z-
dc.date.issued2015-02-04-
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-04T11:27:46Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name2014 ENA Annual Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, U.S.A.en_GB
dc.description2014 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Indiana Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_GB
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