2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/344176
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Poster
Title:
Youth Suicide Attempt Nomenclature Used in Two Central Texas Hospitals
Author(s):
Barczyk, Amanda; Piper, Kaern; Klingensmith, Mary; Alejandro, Elsa; Lawson, Karla
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Amanda Barczyk, PhD, MSW, anbarczyk@seton.org; Karen Piper, BS; Mary Klingensmith, BS; Elsa Alejandro, ADN, RN, LBSW; Karla Lawson, PhD, MPH
Abstract:
Research Abstract: Purpose: The nomenclature utilized for methods of self-directed violence, such as suicide attempts, is substantial but inconsistent. The purpose of this study was to examine suicide attempt nomenclature used to classify suicide attempts in youth who presented to two hospitals in Central Texas with a Level I Trauma Center. Design: A retrospective cohort design was used. Setting: This study reviewed medical records of patients who presented to two hospitals in Central Texas with a Level I Trauma Center, a children’s hospital with 176 beds and over 72,000 emergency room visits annually and a community hospital with 241 beds and over 68,000 emergency room visits annually. Participants/Subjects: This purposive sample consisted of 1,903 encounters meeting the inclusion criteria of being a patient aged 5 through 18, who presented to a hospital due to a self-directed violence from 1/1/2011 to 8/31/2012. The sample consisted predominately of encounters of female patients (N=1027. 54%) that averaged 13.7 years of age (SD + 3.9). Patients were identified as white non-Hispanic (44%), white Hispanic (36%), black non-Hispanic (15%), or Other (5%). Methods: Encounters meeting inclusion criteria were identified by querying four data sources. Study staff then conducted a time-intensive rigorous surveillance method where medical records of the 1,903 encounters were reviewed to determine if the encounter met classification as a suicide attempt. Next, a typical, more feasible, surveillance method was executed where Chief Complaint and ICD-9 code keyword searches of the 1,903 encounters were used to classify whether the encounter was a suicide attempt. Descriptive statistics compared demographic information of encounters found through the rigorous surveillance method to encounters identified through the simplified Chief Complaint keyword search feasible surveillance method. Results/Outcomes: The rigorous surveillance method resulted in 249 encounters being classified as a suicide attempt. In the feasible surveillance, simple searches of ICD 9 codes E950-E959.99 (Suicide and Self-Inflicted Injury) resulted in 321 encounters, only 56% of which were classified as suicide attempts in the rigorous surveillance method. The Chief Complaint database keyword search of the term “Suicide Attempt” resulted in only 11 encounters, 100% of which were classified as suicide attempts in the rigorous surveillance method. Compared to the rigorous surveillance method, the feasible surveillance effort, using the Chief Complaint database, resulted in a drastically smaller sample that over represented females (77% in rigorous surveillance; 90% in feasible surveillance) and white Hispanics (34% in rigorous surveillance; 46% in feasible surveillance). The feasible surveillance sample resulted in no encounters of black non-Hispanic patients, compared to the 13% found in the rigorous surveillance method. Implications: Compared to the time-intensive rigorous surveillance method, the typical, more feasible, surveillance resulted in a skewed demographic representation of suicide attempt encounters that presented to the two hospitals. This study provides evidence that clinicians need to utilize a standardized nomenclature and classification system in order to properly identify patients who have presented due to self-directed violence. Standardization can increase the likelihood of successful surveillance efforts, reduce clinical oversights from classification errors, and eliminate the need of a time-intensive rigorous surveillance method.
Keywords:
Youth Suicide Nomenclature
Repository Posting Date:
4-Feb-2015
Date of Publication:
4-Feb-2015
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
2014 ENA Annual Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, U.S.A.
Description:
2014 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Indiana Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePosteren_GB
dc.titleYouth Suicide Attempt Nomenclature Used in Two Central Texas Hospitalsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBarczyk, Amandaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPiper, Kaernen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKlingensmith, Maryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAlejandro, Elsaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLawson, Karlaen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsAmanda Barczyk, PhD, MSW, anbarczyk@seton.org; Karen Piper, BS; Mary Klingensmith, BS; Elsa Alejandro, ADN, RN, LBSW; Karla Lawson, PhD, MPHen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/344176-
dc.description.abstractResearch Abstract: Purpose: The nomenclature utilized for methods of self-directed violence, such as suicide attempts, is substantial but inconsistent. The purpose of this study was to examine suicide attempt nomenclature used to classify suicide attempts in youth who presented to two hospitals in Central Texas with a Level I Trauma Center. Design: A retrospective cohort design was used. Setting: This study reviewed medical records of patients who presented to two hospitals in Central Texas with a Level I Trauma Center, a children’s hospital with 176 beds and over 72,000 emergency room visits annually and a community hospital with 241 beds and over 68,000 emergency room visits annually. Participants/Subjects: This purposive sample consisted of 1,903 encounters meeting the inclusion criteria of being a patient aged 5 through 18, who presented to a hospital due to a self-directed violence from 1/1/2011 to 8/31/2012. The sample consisted predominately of encounters of female patients (N=1027. 54%) that averaged 13.7 years of age (SD + 3.9). Patients were identified as white non-Hispanic (44%), white Hispanic (36%), black non-Hispanic (15%), or Other (5%). Methods: Encounters meeting inclusion criteria were identified by querying four data sources. Study staff then conducted a time-intensive rigorous surveillance method where medical records of the 1,903 encounters were reviewed to determine if the encounter met classification as a suicide attempt. Next, a typical, more feasible, surveillance method was executed where Chief Complaint and ICD-9 code keyword searches of the 1,903 encounters were used to classify whether the encounter was a suicide attempt. Descriptive statistics compared demographic information of encounters found through the rigorous surveillance method to encounters identified through the simplified Chief Complaint keyword search feasible surveillance method. Results/Outcomes: The rigorous surveillance method resulted in 249 encounters being classified as a suicide attempt. In the feasible surveillance, simple searches of ICD 9 codes E950-E959.99 (Suicide and Self-Inflicted Injury) resulted in 321 encounters, only 56% of which were classified as suicide attempts in the rigorous surveillance method. The Chief Complaint database keyword search of the term “Suicide Attempt” resulted in only 11 encounters, 100% of which were classified as suicide attempts in the rigorous surveillance method. Compared to the rigorous surveillance method, the feasible surveillance effort, using the Chief Complaint database, resulted in a drastically smaller sample that over represented females (77% in rigorous surveillance; 90% in feasible surveillance) and white Hispanics (34% in rigorous surveillance; 46% in feasible surveillance). The feasible surveillance sample resulted in no encounters of black non-Hispanic patients, compared to the 13% found in the rigorous surveillance method. Implications: Compared to the time-intensive rigorous surveillance method, the typical, more feasible, surveillance resulted in a skewed demographic representation of suicide attempt encounters that presented to the two hospitals. This study provides evidence that clinicians need to utilize a standardized nomenclature and classification system in order to properly identify patients who have presented due to self-directed violence. Standardization can increase the likelihood of successful surveillance efforts, reduce clinical oversights from classification errors, and eliminate the need of a time-intensive rigorous surveillance method.en_GB
dc.subjectYouth Suicide Nomenclatureen_GB
dc.date.available2015-02-04T11:27:51Z-
dc.date.issued2015-02-04-
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-04T11:27:51Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name2014 ENA Annual Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, U.S.A.en_GB
dc.description2014 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Indiana Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_GB
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