Identification of Internal Risk Factors and Interventions to Prevent Exertional Heat Illnesses in Hikers: A Systematic Review

14.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/347236
Category:
Full-text
Type:
DNP Capstone Project
Level of Evidence:
Systematic Review
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Identification of Internal Risk Factors and Interventions to Prevent Exertional Heat Illnesses in Hikers: A Systematic Review
Author(s):
Erwin, Sheri D.
Advisors:
Wederski, Lonnie; Rivas, Dawn
Degree:
DNP
Degree Year:
2015
Grantor:
Northern Arizona University
Abstract:

Objective: To identify internal risk factors (e.g., caffeine and alcohol consumption, weight, medications, and medical conditions) and intervention strategies for prevention of exertional heat-related illnesses in hikers.

Methods: A systematic review was conducted using a predetermined list of MeSH headings to identify articles on exertional heat-related illnesses. CINHAL, MEDLINE, and PubMed databases were searched for articles published between 2009 and 2014. The studies were ranked using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine classification system. Studies were included if they had a level of evidence of 3 or higher or a grade of C or better.

Results: The initial search resulted in a total of 330 articles. After the application of the exclusion criteria and analysis using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine classification system, 38 studies and guidelines remained. The studies and guidelines indicated that various medications and medical conditions affect sweat production, core temperature and can reduce the amount of water in the body. Internal factors increase potential for exertional heat-related illnesses: caffeine consumption, alcohol intake, and being overweight. In addition, heat acclimatization is necessary regardless of fitness level.

Conclusion: To mitigate exertional heat-related illnesses related to medications, medical providers and dispensing pharmacists can assist patients with proper counseling regarding medications known to disrupt heat responses. Also, education of hikers about the effects of intermixing hiking activities with alcohol or caffeine may prevent or reduce the severity of exertional heat-related illnesses along with proper heat acclimatization. 

Citation:
Erwin, S. D. (2015, March). Identification of internal risk factors and interventions to prevent exertional heat illnesses in hikers: A systematic review (Doctoral capstone project). Retrieved from http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/347236
Keywords:
heat illness; heat exhaustion; prevention; Intervention
MeSH:
Heat Exhaustion--prevention & control
Note:
This work has been approved through a faculty review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.
Repository Posting Date:
2015-03-27T18:42:36Z
Date of Publication:
2015-03-27

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorWederski, Lonnie-
dc.contributor.advisorRivas, Dawn-
dc.contributor.authorErwin, Sheri D.-
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-27T18:42:36Z-
dc.date.available2015-03-27T18:42:36Z-
dc.date.issued2015-03-27-
dc.identifier.citationErwin, S. D. (2015, March). Identification of internal risk factors and interventions to prevent exertional heat illnesses in hikers: A systematic review (Doctoral capstone project). Retrieved from http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/347236en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/347236-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Objective: </strong>To identify internal risk factors (e.g., caffeine and alcohol consumption, weight, medications, and medical conditions) and intervention strategies for prevention of exertional heat-related illnesses in hikers.</p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong>A systematic review was conducted using a predetermined list of MeSH headings to identify articles on exertional heat-related illnesses. CINHAL, MEDLINE, and PubMed databases were searched for articles published between 2009 and 2014. The studies were ranked using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine classification system. Studies were included if they had a level of evidence of 3 or higher or a grade of C or better.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong> The initial search resulted in a total of 330 articles. After the application of the exclusion criteria and analysis using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine classification system, 38 studies and guidelines remained. The studies and guidelines indicated that various medications and medical conditions affect sweat production, core temperature and can reduce the amount of water in the body. Internal factors increase potential for exertional heat-related illnesses: caffeine consumption, alcohol intake, and being overweight. In addition, heat acclimatization is necessary regardless of fitness level.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>To mitigate exertional heat-related illnesses related to medications, medical providers and dispensing pharmacists can assist patients with proper counseling regarding medications known to disrupt heat responses. Also, education of hikers about the effects of intermixing hiking activities with alcohol or caffeine may prevent or reduce the severity of exertional heat-related illnesses along with proper heat acclimatization. </p>en_GB
dc.subjectheat illnessen_GB
dc.subjectheat exhaustionen_GB
dc.subjectpreventionen_GB
dc.subjectInterventionen_GB
dc.subject.meshHeat Exhaustion--prevention & controlen_US
dc.titleIdentification of Internal Risk Factors and Interventions to Prevent Exertional Heat Illnesses in Hikers: A Systematic Review-
dc.typeDNP Capstone Projecten
thesis.degree.grantorNorthern Arizona Universityen_GB
thesis.degree.levelDNPen
dc.description.noteThis work has been approved through a faculty review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.-
thesis.degree.year2015en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten_GB
dc.evidence.levelSystematic Reviewen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.author.detailsSheri D. Erwin, FNP-Cen_US
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