Improving Intimate Partner Violence Screening in the Emergency Department Setting

11.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/550929
Category:
Full-text
Type:
DNP Capstone Project
Level of Evidence:
Cohort Study
Research Approach:
Mixed/Multi Method Research
Title:
Improving Intimate Partner Violence Screening in the Emergency Department Setting
Author(s):
Karnitschnig, Laura M.
Additional Author Information:
Laura M. Karnitschnig, MN, RN, CPNP
Advisors:
Gould, Kimberly; Price, Donna
Degree:
DNP
Degree Year:
2015
Grantor:
Northern Arizona University
Abstract:

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significant public health issue. Global rates of IPV
range between 15% and 71%. Approximately three million U.S. women are affected during their
lifetimes; and approximately 15.5 million children in the U.S. are exposed to violence in the
home annually. To provide resources and decrease health consequences of exposure to violence,
violence screening in healthcare settings has been recommended by both medical and nursing
organizations. The objectives of this study were to improve RNs’ ability to screen for IPV,
increase identification of individuals and families exposed to IPV and ensure provision of
appropriate resources, and advance knowledge of continued nursing barriers to screening in the
emergency department (ED) setting. This cohort study utilized an embedded research design.
IPV educational training was provided to the ED nurses. Study data included: IPV screening
rates, IPV positive screenings, and IPV referrals or resources provided. Additionally, a nine-item
survey to the ED nurses elicited barriers to routine IPV screening. The numbers of IPV positive
screening were significantly increased after the educational training. Also, resources provided to
patients doubled. Privacy was the primary reported barrier to routine screening in the ED setting.
Patients and families benefit from the delivery of IPV education to nurses through early
identification and provision of resources. IPV education to nurses has the ability to positively
impact the results of screenings. Privacy and time constraints need to be addressed to support
increasing rates of IPV screening in the ED setting.

Citation:
Karnitschnig, L. M. (2015, April). Improving intimate partner violence screening in the emergency department setting (Doctoral capstone proejct). Retrieved from http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/550929
Keywords:
domestic violence; intimate partner violence; screening; children
MeSH:
Domestic Violence; Intimate Partner Violence; Emergency Services, Hospital; Mass Screening
Note:
This work has been approved through a faculty review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.
Repository Posting Date:
2015-04-29T17:37:08Z
Date of Publication:
2015-04-29

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorGould, Kimberly-
dc.contributor.advisorPrice, Donna-
dc.contributor.authorKarnitschnig, Laura M.-
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-29T17:37:08Z-
dc.date.available2015-04-29T17:37:08Z-
dc.date.issued2015-04-29-
dc.identifier.citationKarnitschnig, L. M. (2015, April). Improving intimate partner violence screening in the emergency department setting (Doctoral capstone proejct). Retrieved from http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/550929en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/550929-
dc.description.abstract<p>Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significant public health issue. Global rates of IPV<br />range between 15% and 71%. Approximately three million U.S. women are affected during their<br />lifetimes; and approximately 15.5 million children in the U.S. are exposed to violence in the<br />home annually. To provide resources and decrease health consequences of exposure to violence,<br />violence screening in healthcare settings has been recommended by both medical and nursing<br />organizations. The objectives of this study were to improve RNs’ ability to screen for IPV,<br />increase identification of individuals and families exposed to IPV and ensure provision of<br />appropriate resources, and advance knowledge of continued nursing barriers to screening in the<br />emergency department (ED) setting. This cohort study utilized an embedded research design.<br />IPV educational training was provided to the ED nurses. Study data included: IPV screening<br />rates, IPV positive screenings, and IPV referrals or resources provided. Additionally, a nine-item<br />survey to the ED nurses elicited barriers to routine IPV screening. The numbers of IPV positive<br />screening were significantly increased after the educational training. Also, resources provided to<br />patients doubled. Privacy was the primary reported barrier to routine screening in the ED setting.<br />Patients and families benefit from the delivery of IPV education to nurses through early<br />identification and provision of resources. IPV education to nurses has the ability to positively<br />impact the results of screenings. Privacy and time constraints need to be addressed to support<br />increasing rates of IPV screening in the ED setting.</p>en_GB
dc.subjectdomestic violenceen_GB
dc.subjectintimate partner violenceen_GB
dc.subjectscreeningen_GB
dc.subjectchildrenen_GB
dc.subject.meshDomestic Violenceen_US
dc.subject.meshIntimate Partner Violenceen_US
dc.subject.meshEmergency Services, Hospitalen_US
dc.subject.meshMass Screeningen_US
dc.titleImproving Intimate Partner Violence Screening in the Emergency Department Setting-
dc.typeDNP Capstone Projecten
thesis.degree.grantorNorthern Arizona Universityen_GB
thesis.degree.levelDNPen
dc.description.noteThis work has been approved through a faculty review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.-
dc.primary-author.detailsLaura M. Karnitschnig, MN, RN, CPNPen_GB
thesis.degree.year2015en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten_GB
dc.evidence.levelCohort Studyen
dc.research.approachMixed/Multi Method Researchen
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.