24.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/556413
Category:
Full-text
Type:
DNP Capstone Project
Level of Evidence:
Cohort Study
Research Approach:
Translational Research/Evidence-based Practice
Title:
Intervention for African American Adults with type 2 diabetes
Author(s):
Caple, Annette
Additional Author Information:
Annette Caple, DNP, MSN, FNP-BC, CDE 901 3512766
Advisors:
Manty, JoAnn
Degree:
DNP
Degree Year:
2015
Grantor:
Capella University
Abstract:

The purpose of this project was to examine outcomes in African American adult patients with type 2 diabetes who received education and diet and exercise services compared to those who did not.  Type 2 diabetes accounts for 90-95% of all diabetes cases, and is more prevalent among African Americans. Diabetes is the fifth leading cause of death in the African American community.

The project was a prospective cohort design.  A population of 30 African American patients with type 2 diabetes, between the ages of 20-40, was identified in a physician’s office through a review of administrative and laboratory data from the Managed Care database.  Fifteen participants received education and diet and exercise services, while 15 participants did not. The intervention was two-fold with emphasis placed on pre- and post-diabetes education knowledge.  Diabetes education curriculum was used in each of six sessions that included general diabetes self-care education, diet and exercise.  Hemoglobin AIC (HA1C) value levels were measured at baseline and six months. 

The participants in the intervention group were found to have better glycemic control than the participants in the non-intervention group.  The post-education survey demonstrated greater diabetes self-care knowledge than the pre-education survey.  Diabetes and diet and exercise education was associated with lower HA1C levels.  Patients given diabetes self-care education and diet and exercise services were more likely to attain glycemic control (HA1C < 7.0%) than those who received no intervention. 

Citation:
Caple, A. (2015, June). Intervention for African American adults with type 2 diabetes (Doctoral capstone project). Retrieved from http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/556413
Keywords:
Diabetes Mellitus complications; Blood sugar control
MeSH:
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2; Diabetes Complications; Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring; African Americans
Note:
This work has been approved through a faculty review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.
Repository Posting Date:
2015-06-04T17:10:56Z
Date of Publication:
2015-06-04

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorManty, JoAnn-
dc.contributor.authorCaple, Annette-
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-04T17:10:56Z-
dc.date.available2015-06-04T17:10:56Z-
dc.date.issued2015-06-04-
dc.identifier.citationCaple, A. (2015, June). Intervention for African American adults with type 2 diabetes (Doctoral capstone project). Retrieved from http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/556413en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/556413-
dc.description.abstract<p>The purpose of this project was to examine outcomes in African American adult patients with type 2 diabetes who received education and diet and exercise services compared to those who did not.  Type 2 diabetes accounts for 90-95% of all diabetes cases, and is more prevalent among African Americans. Diabetes is the fifth leading cause of death in the African American community.</p> <p>The project was a prospective cohort design.  A population of 30 African American patients with type 2 diabetes, between the ages of 20-40, was identified in a physician’s office through a review of administrative and laboratory data from the Managed Care database.  Fifteen participants received education and diet and exercise services, while 15 participants did not. The intervention was two-fold with emphasis placed on pre- and post-diabetes education knowledge.  Diabetes education curriculum was used in each of six sessions that included general diabetes self-care education, diet and exercise.  Hemoglobin AIC (HA1C) value levels were measured at baseline and six months. </p> <p>The participants in the intervention group were found to have better glycemic control than the participants in the non-intervention group.  The post-education survey demonstrated greater diabetes self-care knowledge than the pre-education survey.  Diabetes and diet and exercise education was associated with lower HA1C levels.  Patients given diabetes self-care education and diet and exercise services were more likely to attain glycemic control (HA1C < 7.0%) than those who received no intervention. </p>en_GB
dc.rightsAn error occurred on the license name.*
dc.rights.uriAn error occurred getting the license - uri.*
dc.subjectDiabetes Mellitus complicationsen_GB
dc.subjectBlood sugar controlen_GB
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitus, Type 2en_US
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Complicationsen_US
dc.subject.meshBlood Glucose Self-Monitoringen_US
dc.subject.meshAfrican Americansen_US
dc.titleIntervention for African American Adults with type 2 diabetes-
dc.typeDNP Capstone Projecten
thesis.degree.grantorCapella Universityen_GB
thesis.degree.levelDNPen
dc.description.noteThis work has been approved through a faculty review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.-
dc.primary-author.detailsAnnette Caple, DNP, MSN, FNP-BC, CDE 901 3512766en_GB
thesis.degree.year2015en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten_GB
dc.evidence.levelCohort Studyen
dc.research.approachTranslational Research/Evidence-based Practiceen
dc.author.detailsAnnette Caple, DNP, MSN, FNP-BC, CDE 901 3512766en_US
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