Influence of Maternal Childhood Adversity on the Psycho-Neuroendocrine-Inflammatory Profile During Pregnancy

6.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/563644
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Research Study
Level of Evidence:
Outcomes Research
Research Approach:
Quantitative Research
Title:
Influence of Maternal Childhood Adversity on the Psycho-Neuroendocrine-Inflammatory Profile During Pregnancy
Author(s):
Kotz, Karen J.; Mathews, Herbert L.; Janusek, Linda Witek
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Beta
Author Details:
Karen J. Kotz, PhDc, RN, MSN, APN, NNP-BC, email: KarenJKotz@gmail.com; Herbert L. Mathews, PhD, email: HMathew@luc.edu; Linda Witek Janusek, PhD, RN, FAAN, email: LJanuse@luc.edu
Abstract:

Exposure to excessive stress either before or during pregnancy can disrupt neuroendocrine-immune processes required for successful pregnancy outcomes. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship among maternal childhood adversity, psychological, and neuroendocrine-immune processes during pregnancy; and to explore the impact of maternal stress on neonatal outcomes (birthweight and gestational age). In addition, the modifying effect of maternal social support was examined. Ninety-five healthy, low-risk pregnant women were enrolled and evaluated during their second and third trimesters of pregnancy.  Women completed psychometric instruments and provided blood samples for measurement of the proinflammatory cytokine, IL-6; and a hair sample for measurement of hair cortisol (as an index of chronic stress over the previous three month period).  Infant birthweight and gestational age were obtained from medical records. Key findings demonstrated maternal childhood adversity was associated with greater perceived stress, depressive risk, anxiety, and mood disorder, at mid- and late-pregnancy; while maternal childhood adversity was associated with lower social support at mid- and late-pregnancy.  In addition, maternal exposure to greater childhood adversity was correlated with higher circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokine, IL-6, at late-pregnancy. Moreover, higher IL-6 levels were linked to earlier gestational age and lower birthweight. Findings also revealed that women who experienced greater maternal childhood adversity in combination with lower social support during their pregnancy delivered infants with lower birthweight and earlier gestational age. Increased levels of maternal hair cortisol during the third trimester were associated with higher levels of perceived stress during the second trimester, and women who expressed less positive feelings about their pregnancy had higher levels of hair cortisol at mid-pregnancy.  These findings add to the growing body of evidence demonstrating that exposure to adversity early in life has long-lasting effects that influence stress levels and depressive mood during pregnancy, and this may disrupt inflammatory and neuroendocrine regulation deeded for optimal maternal-infant health outcomes.  The findings can contribute to improved approaches to identify and stratify risk for adverse maternal-infant health outcomes, as well as guide the development of early intervention programs and health policy for women who are pregnant or who plan to become pregnant. Such contribution is significant in that the well-being of mothers and infants determine the health of the next generation.

Keywords:
Adversity; Pregnancy; Depression; Anxiety; Social Support; neonatal outcomes; Cytokines; Cortisol
CINAHL Headings:
Pregnancy Outcomes--Psychosocial Factors
Repository Posting Date:
3-Aug-2015
Date of Publication:
3-Aug-2015
Citation:
Kotz, K. J., Mathews, H. L., & Janusek, L. W. (2015). Influence of maternal childhood adversity on the psycho-neuroendocrine-inflammatory profile during pregnancy. Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository. Retrieved from http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/563644
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Description:
2013 Sigma Theta Tau International, Doris Bloch Research Award Recipient
Note:
2013 Doris Bloch Research Grant Recipient; The Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typeResearch Studyen
dc.evidence.levelOutcomes Researchen
dc.research.approachQuantitative Researchen
dc.titleInfluence of Maternal Childhood Adversity on the Psycho-Neuroendocrine-Inflammatory Profile During Pregnancyen_US
dc.contributor.authorKotz, Karen J.en
dc.contributor.authorMathews, Herbert L.en
dc.contributor.authorJanusek, Linda Witeken
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Betaen
dc.author.detailsKaren J. Kotz, PhDc, RN, MSN, APN, NNP-BC, email: KarenJKotz@gmail.com; Herbert L. Mathews, PhD, email: HMathew@luc.edu; Linda Witek Janusek, PhD, RN, FAAN, email: LJanuse@luc.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/563644en
dc.description.abstract<p><p>Exposure to excessive stress either before or during pregnancy can disrupt neuroendocrine-immune processes required for successful pregnancy outcomes. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship among maternal childhood adversity, psychological, and neuroendocrine-immune processes during pregnancy; and to explore the impact of maternal stress on neonatal outcomes (birthweight and gestational age). In addition, the modifying effect of maternal social support was examined. Ninety-five healthy, low-risk pregnant women were enrolled and evaluated during their second and third trimesters of pregnancy.  Women completed psychometric instruments and provided blood samples for measurement of the proinflammatory cytokine, IL-6; and a hair sample for measurement of hair cortisol (as an index of chronic stress over the previous three month period).  Infant birthweight and gestational age were obtained from medical records. Key findings demonstrated maternal childhood adversity was associated with greater perceived stress, depressive risk, anxiety, and mood disorder, at mid- and late-pregnancy; while maternal childhood adversity was associated with lower social support at mid- and late-pregnancy.  In addition, maternal exposure to greater childhood adversity was correlated with higher circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokine, IL-6, at late-pregnancy. Moreover, higher IL-6 levels were linked to earlier gestational age and lower birthweight. Findings also revealed that women who experienced greater maternal childhood adversity in combination with lower social support during their pregnancy delivered infants with lower birthweight and earlier gestational age. Increased levels of maternal hair cortisol during the third trimester were associated with higher levels of perceived stress during the second trimester, and women who expressed less positive feelings about their pregnancy had higher levels of hair cortisol at mid-pregnancy.  These findings add to the growing body of evidence demonstrating that exposure to adversity early in life has long-lasting effects that influence stress levels and depressive mood during pregnancy, and this may disrupt inflammatory and neuroendocrine regulation deeded for optimal maternal-infant health outcomes.  The findings can contribute to improved approaches to identify and stratify risk for adverse maternal-infant health outcomes, as well as guide the development of early intervention programs and health policy for women who are pregnant or who plan to become pregnant. Such contribution is significant in that the well-being of mothers and infants determine the health of the next generation.</p></p>en
dc.subjectAdversityen
dc.subjectPregnancyen
dc.subjectDepressionen
dc.subjectAnxietyen
dc.subjectSocial Supporten
dc.subjectneonatal outcomesen
dc.subjectCytokinesen
dc.subjectCortisolen
dc.subject.cinahlPregnancy Outcomes--Psychosocial Factorsen_US
dc.date.available2015-08-03T20:18:47Zen
dc.date.issued2015-08-03en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T20:18:47Zen
dc.identifier.citationKotz, K. J., Mathews, H. L., & Janusek, L. W. (2015). Influence of maternal childhood adversity on the psycho-neuroendocrine-inflammatory profile during pregnancy. Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository. Retrieved from http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/563644en
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.identifier.citationKotz, K. J., Mathews, H. L., & Janusek, L. W. (2015). Influence of maternal childhood adversity on the psycho-neuroendocrine-inflammatory profile during pregnancy. Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository. Retrieved from http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/563644en
dc.description2013 Sigma Theta Tau International, Doris Bloch Research Award Recipienten
dc.description.note2013 Doris Bloch Research Grant Recipienten
dc.description.noteThe Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.en
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