Effect of Nurse-Led Simulation on OB/Perinatal Nurses' Knowledge & Confidence in Managing Complications & Emergencies

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/565669
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Report
Level of Evidence:
Quasi-Experimental Study, Other
Research Approach:
Quantitative Research
Title:
Effect of Nurse-Led Simulation on OB/Perinatal Nurses' Knowledge & Confidence in Managing Complications & Emergencies
Author(s):
Highfield, Martha E. Farrar
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Gamma Tau-at-Large
Author Details:
Martha E. Farrar Highfield, PhD, RN, email: martha.highfield@dignityhealth.org
Abstract:

Background & Aims

OB/perinatal emergencies and complications are low-volume, high risk occurrences, and research suggests that simulation helps both novice and experienced clinicians to obtain and maintain clinical competence (Argani, Eichelberger, Deering, & Satin, 2012; Committee on Patient Safety & Quality Improvement, 2011; Cooper et al., 2012; Ennen & Satin, 2010; Fuchs, Miller & Berkowitz, 2009; Gardner, Walzer, Simon, & Raemer, 2008; Jeffries, Bambini, Hensel, Moorman, & Washburn, 2009; Shekelle et al., 2013). However, much nursing simulation research occurs in academic settings that may not be transferable to practice ones; and reliable/valid, quantitative, outcome measures are needed to determine best practices (Birch et al., 2007; Brewer, 2011; Cooper et al., 2012; Gough, Hellaby, Jones, & MacKinnon, 2012; Jeffries et al., 2009). 

Keywords:
emergencies nursing; obstetrical nursing education; simulations; Education; Quasi experimental design; instrument; perinatal
MeSH:
Obstetric Nursing--education
CINAHL Headings:
Simulations; Nursing Knowledge
Repository Posting Date:
5-Aug-2015
Date of Publication:
5-Aug-2015
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Note:
The Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typeReporten
dc.evidence.levelQuasi-Experimental Study, Otheren
dc.research.approachQuantitative Researchen
dc.titleEffect of Nurse-Led Simulation on OB/Perinatal Nurses' Knowledge & Confidence in Managing Complications & Emergenciesen_US
dc.contributor.authorHighfield, Martha E. Farraren
dc.contributor.departmentGamma Tau-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsMartha E. Farrar Highfield, PhD, RN, email: martha.highfield@dignityhealth.orgen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/565669en
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Background & Aims</strong></p> <p>OB/perinatal emergencies and complications are low-volume, high risk occurrences, and research suggests that simulation helps both novice and experienced clinicians to obtain and maintain clinical competence (Argani, Eichelberger, Deering, & Satin, 2012; Committee on Patient Safety & Quality Improvement, 2011; Cooper et al., 2012; Ennen & Satin, 2010; Fuchs, Miller & Berkowitz, 2009; Gardner, Walzer, Simon, & Raemer, 2008; Jeffries, Bambini, Hensel, Moorman, & Washburn, 2009; Shekelle et al., 2013). However, much nursing simulation research occurs in academic settings that may not be transferable to practice ones; and reliable/valid, quantitative, outcome measures are needed to determine best practices (Birch et al., 2007; Brewer, 2011; Cooper et al., 2012; Gough, Hellaby, Jones, & MacKinnon, 2012; Jeffries et al., 2009). </p>en
dc.subjectemergencies nursingen
dc.subjectobstetrical nursing educationen
dc.subjectsimulationsen
dc.subjectEducationen
dc.subjectQuasi experimental designen
dc.subjectinstrumenten
dc.subjectperinatalen
dc.subject.meshObstetric Nursing--educationen
dc.subject.cinahlSimulationsen
dc.subject.cinahlNursing Knowledgeen
dc.date.available2015-08-05T21:02:09Zen
dc.date.issued2015-08-05en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-05T21:02:09Zen
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.description.noteThe Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.en
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