10.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/579534
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
DNP Project
Level of Evidence:
Systematic Review
Research Approach:
Other
Title:
A Journey of Challenges with Medication Reconciliation
Author(s):
Vinod, Julie
Additional Author Information:
Julie Vinod, DNP, MS, ANP-C, RN,
Advisors:
Jurgens, Corrine
Degree:
DNP
Degree Year:
2015
Grantor:
Stonybrook University
Abstract:

ABSTRACT

 

Background and purpose: Unintentional medication errors are a significant problem in terms of morbidity, mortality and cost. Medication reconciliation is one of several strategies to reduce medication errors. The purpose of this study was to examine accuracy of electronic medication reconciliation upon admission compared to discharge.

Method: A retrospective electronic chart review was conducted at a tertiary care safety-net hospital using a data extraction tool created for the study. Modifiable and non-modifiable factors related to medication reconciliation were analyzed using descriptive statistics.

Conclusions: The sample of 150 patients (mean age 58.8, SD 9.4) had more males and was predominately white. Results suggest prevalence of medication discrepancies were detected, corrected and significant in greater than 60% of discharge medication reconciliations. Eighty percent of patients were discharged home with a change in medication regime. Seventy-one percent patients reported to be on five medications or more. The most common comorbid illnesses included hypertension (86%), hyperlipidemia (67%), and coronary artery disease (60%).

Implications: Discharge Medication Reconciliation is costly in terms of nursing workload. Detected discharge medication reconciliation took 30 minutes or less to get discrepancies corrected. Delay in discharge to correct medication discrepancies may have a negative impact on patient satisfaction and financial management of the institution. Outcomes rely on health care provider’s ability to enter complete and accurate medication information in the medical record and to identify risk factors for medication discrepancies. 

Citation:
Vinod, J. (2015). A journey of challenges with medication reconciliation (Doctoral capstone project). Retrieved from http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/579534
Keywords:
medication reconciliation; Medication discrepancies; Admission; Discharge
MeSH:
Medication Reconciliation; Medication Errors
Note:
This work has been approved through a faculty review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.
Repository Posting Date:
2015-10-09T19:32:37Z
Date of Publication:
2015-10-09

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorJurgens, Corrineen
dc.contributor.authorVinod, Julieen
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-09T19:32:37Zen
dc.date.available2015-10-09T19:32:37Zen
dc.date.issued2015-10-09en
dc.identifier.citationVinod, J. (2015). A journey of challenges with medication reconciliation (Doctoral capstone project). Retrieved from http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/579534en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/579534en
dc.description.abstract<p align="center">ABSTRACT</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Background and purpose: </strong>Unintentional medication errors are a significant problem in terms of morbidity, mortality and cost. Medication reconciliation is one of several strategies to reduce medication errors. The purpose of this study was to examine accuracy of electronic medication reconciliation upon admission compared to discharge.</p> <p><strong>Method: </strong>A retrospective electronic chart review was conducted at a tertiary care safety-net hospital using a data extraction tool created for the study. Modifiable and non-modifiable factors related to medication reconciliation were analyzed using descriptive statistics.</p> <p><strong>Conclusions: </strong>The sample of 150 patients (mean age 58.8, SD 9.4) had more males and was predominately white. Results suggest prevalence of medication discrepancies were detected, corrected and significant in greater than 60% of discharge medication reconciliations. Eighty percent of patients were discharged home with a change in medication regime. Seventy-one percent patients reported to be on five medications or more. The most common comorbid illnesses included hypertension (86%), hyperlipidemia (67%), and coronary artery disease (60%).</p> <p><strong>Implications: </strong>Discharge Medication Reconciliation is costly in terms of nursing workload. Detected discharge medication reconciliation took 30 minutes or less to get discrepancies corrected. Delay in discharge to correct medication discrepancies may have a negative impact on patient satisfaction and financial management of the institution. Outcomes rely on health care provider’s ability to enter complete and accurate medication information in the medical record and to identify risk factors for medication discrepancies. </p>en
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.rightsAn error occurred on the license name.*
dc.rights.uriAn error occurred getting the license - uri.*
dc.subjectmedication reconciliationen
dc.subjectMedication discrepanciesen
dc.subjectAdmissionen
dc.subjectDischargeen
dc.subject.meshMedication Reconciliationen
dc.subject.meshMedication Errorsen
dc.titleA Journey of Challenges with Medication Reconciliationen_US
dc.typeDNP Projecten
thesis.degree.grantorStonybrook Universityen
thesis.degree.levelDNPen
dc.description.noteThis work has been approved through a faculty review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.en_US
dc.primary-author.detailsJulie Vinod, DNP, MS, ANP-C, RN,en
thesis.degree.year2015en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.evidence.levelSystematic Reviewen
dc.research.approachOtheren
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