Feasibility Project to Determine Strategies for Self-Administration of a Subcutaneous Orphan Drug for Treatment of Short Bowel Syndrome: Impact on Adherence

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/581118
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
DNP Project
Level of Evidence:
Outcomes Research
Research Approach:
Pilot/Exploratory Study
Title:
Feasibility Project to Determine Strategies for Self-Administration of a Subcutaneous Orphan Drug for Treatment of Short Bowel Syndrome: Impact on Adherence
Author(s):
Strootman, Virginia A.
Additional Author Information:
Virginia A. Strootman, DNP, RN, CRNI, IgCN email: nightinggale16 at verizon dot net
Advisors:
Suttle, Catherine; Forsythe, Lydia L.; Rosskamp, Ralf
Degree:
DNP
Degree Year:
2015
Grantor:
Capella University
Abstract:

Several strategies have been suggested to improve the nurse education provided to the nurses who educate the patients.  The assumption is by providing evidence-based strategies to promote adherence to the nurses, prior to educating the patients, an increase in adherence rates can be demonstrated.  Strategies discussed involve a feasibility project whereby an improved nurse educational model demonstrates improvement in medication adherence rates for adults with a rare and chronic disease states that self-administer an orphan drug for short bowel syndrome.

Citation:
Strootman, V. A. (2015). Feasibility project to determine strategies for self-administration of a subcutaneous orphan drug for treatment of short bowel syndrome: Impact on adherence (doctoral capstone project). Retrieved from http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/581118
Keywords:
short bowel syndrome; adherence; rare disease; nurse model
MeSH:
Short Bowel Syndrome; Self Administration; Medication Adherence; Models, Nursing; Rare Diseases
CINAHL Headings:
Drugs, Orphan
Note:
This work has been approved through a faculty review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.
Repository Posting Date:
2015-10-26T14:20:52Z
Date of Publication:
2015-10-26

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorSuttle, Catherineen
dc.contributor.advisorForsythe, Lydia L.en
dc.contributor.advisorRosskamp, Ralfen
dc.contributor.authorStrootman, Virginia A.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-26T14:20:52Zen
dc.date.available2015-10-26T14:20:52Zen
dc.date.issued2015-10-26en
dc.identifier.citationStrootman, V. A. (2015). Feasibility project to determine strategies for self-administration of a subcutaneous orphan drug for treatment of short bowel syndrome: Impact on adherence (doctoral capstone project). Retrieved from http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/581118en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/581118en
dc.description.abstract<p>Several strategies have been suggested to improve the nurse education provided to the nurses who educate the patients.  The assumption is by providing evidence-based strategies to promote adherence to the nurses, prior to educating the patients, an increase in adherence rates can be demonstrated.  Strategies discussed involve a feasibility project whereby an improved nurse educational model demonstrates improvement in medication adherence rates for adults with a rare and chronic disease states that self-administer an orphan drug for short bowel syndrome.</p>en
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.rightsAn error occurred on the license name.*
dc.rights.uriAn error occurred getting the license - uri.*
dc.subjectshort bowel syndromeen
dc.subjectadherenceen
dc.subjectrare diseaseen
dc.subjectnurse modelen
dc.subject.meshShort Bowel Syndromeen
dc.subject.meshSelf Administrationen
dc.subject.meshMedication Adherenceen
dc.subject.meshModels, Nursingen
dc.subject.meshRare Diseasesen
dc.titleFeasibility Project to Determine Strategies for Self-Administration of a Subcutaneous Orphan Drug for Treatment of Short Bowel Syndrome: Impact on Adherenceen_US
dc.typeDNP Projecten
thesis.degree.grantorCapella Universityen
thesis.degree.levelDNPen
dc.description.noteThis work has been approved through a faculty review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.en
dc.primary-author.detailsVirginia A. Strootman, DNP, RN, CRNI, IgCN email: nightinggale16 at verizon dot neten
thesis.degree.year2015en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.evidence.levelOutcomes Researchen
dc.research.approachPilot/Exploratory Studyen
dc.subject.cinahlDrugs, Orphanen
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