2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/582633
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Article
Level of Evidence:
Qualitative Study, Phenomenology
Research Approach:
Qualitative Research
Title:
Moral Regret - The Experience of Breaches of a Nursing Ideal
Author(s):
Wurzbach, Mary Ellen
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Eta Pi
Author Details:
Mary Ellen Wurzbach, R.N., FNP, Ph.D., e-mail: wurzbacm at uwosh dot edu,
Abstract:

            Recently, Johnstone and Hutchinson (2015) called for abandoning the construct of “moral distress”. For various reasons, they believe that too much attention is paid to it in the nursing literature, that the studies are not sound and that calling for action to relieve moral distress may be a moral imposition in the lives of our patients, families and colleagues.

            There is one overriding concern about abandoning the construct of moral distress and that is that the phenomenon exists in the professional and personal lives of nurses despite the terminology. A construct is a manufactured concept with certain properties while the phenomenon of moral distress actually exists, independently of whether anyone studies or examines it. Whether the concept is called moral distress is another matter.

            In the author’s research the experience of nurses was that of the concept of moral regret or in a qualitative sense “looking back”. A concept (not a construct) existed independently for many nurses - independently of the organization and of others. The author titled it moral regret or “looking back.” It was a concept that so clearly existed and was experienced by so many nurses personally and professionally that the author made it one of her primary concepts of interest in nursing ethics. The “construct” of moral distress does exist also but little time has been spent studying the ethical aspects of it. This article will examine the ethical antecedents and consequences of the concept the author named moral regret and those that precede the constructs of moral distress and moral discomfort - possibly forms or degrees of ethical dysphoria.

Keywords:
ethical issues; ethics research; ethics, nursing education; ethical decision making; moral distress
MeSH:
Ethics; Ethics, Nursing; Morals; Philosophy, Nursing
CINAHL Headings:
Decision Making, Ethical
Repository Posting Date:
24-Nov-2015
Date of Publication:
24-Nov-2015
Citation:
Wurzbach, M. E. (2015). Moral regret: The experience of breaches of a nursing ideal. Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository. Retrieved from http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/582633
Note:
This work has been approved through a peer-review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.evidence.levelQualitative Study, Phenomenologyen
dc.research.approachQualitative Researchen
dc.titleMoral Regret - The Experience of Breaches of a Nursing Idealen_US
dc.contributor.authorWurzbach, Mary Ellenen
dc.contributor.departmentEta Pien
dc.author.detailsMary Ellen Wurzbach, R.N., FNP, Ph.D., e-mail: wurzbacm at uwosh dot edu,en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/582633en
dc.description.abstract<p>            Recently, Johnstone and Hutchinson (2015) called for abandoning the construct of “moral distress”. For various reasons, they believe that too much attention is paid to it in the nursing literature, that the studies are not sound and that calling for action to relieve moral distress may be a moral imposition in the lives of our patients, families and colleagues.</p> <p>            There is one overriding concern about abandoning the construct of moral distress and that is that the phenomenon exists in the professional and personal lives of nurses despite the terminology. A construct is a manufactured concept with certain properties while the phenomenon of moral distress actually exists, independently of whether anyone studies or examines it. Whether the concept is called moral distress is another matter.</p> <p>            In the author’s research the experience of nurses was that of the concept of moral regret or in a qualitative sense “looking back”. A concept (not a construct) existed independently for many nurses - independently of the organization and of others. The author titled it moral regret or “looking back.” It was a concept that so clearly existed and was experienced by so many nurses personally and professionally that the author made it one of her primary concepts of interest in nursing ethics. The “construct” of moral distress does exist also but little time has been spent studying the ethical aspects of it. This article will examine the ethical antecedents and consequences of the concept the author named moral regret and those that precede the constructs of moral distress and moral discomfort - possibly forms or degrees of ethical dysphoria.</p>en
dc.subjectethical issuesen
dc.subjectethics researchen
dc.subjectethics, nursing educationen
dc.subjectethical decision makingen
dc.subjectmoral distressen
dc.subject.meshEthicsen
dc.subject.meshEthics, Nursingen
dc.subject.meshMoralsen
dc.subject.meshPhilosophy, Nursingen
dc.subject.cinahlDecision Making, Ethicalen
dc.date.available2015-11-24T18:55:10Zen
dc.date.issued2015-11-24en
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-24T18:55:10Zen
dc.identifier.citationWurzbach, M. E. (2015). Moral regret: The experience of breaches of a nursing ideal. Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository. Retrieved from http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/582633en
dc.identifier.citationWurzbach, M. E. (2015). Moral regret: The experience of breaches of a nursing ideal. Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository. Retrieved from http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/582633en
dc.description.noteThis work has been approved through a peer-review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.en
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