Skin-to-skin Contact After Birth to Promote Newborns' Vital Stabilization: An Evidence-Based Project

19.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/595726
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Thesis
Level of Evidence:
Literature Review
Research Approach:
Other
Title:
Skin-to-skin Contact After Birth to Promote Newborns' Vital Stabilization: An Evidence-Based Project
Author(s):
Bricker, Stephanie; Johnson, Rachel; Stom, Caitlin
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Tau Tau
Advisors:
Smallwood, Christopher J.
Author Details:
Stephanie Bricker, RN BSN, email: Stephanie.Bricker at methodistcollege dot edu; Rachel Johnson, RN, email: Rachel.Johnson at methodistcollege dot edu; Caitlin Stom, RN BSN, email: Caitlin.Stom at methodistcollege dot edu
Abstract:


Abstract

The hours immediately following birth are a crucial time for an infant to sustain life. Skin-to-skin contact (SSC) during this time provides the infant with natural thermoregulation and promotes oxygenation. The purpose of this evidence-based project is to examine the physiological effects SSC has on full-term newborns. The research was centered around the PICOT question: In full term newborns, how does direct skin-to-skin contact, compared to no skin-to-skin contact, affect the stabilization of the infant as measured by the infant’s vital signs, when practiced within the first few hours after birth? Using terms related to the PICOT question, an extensive database search was completed in Cochrane, CINAHL, and ProQuest, yielding four articles for inclusion. Each article was critically appraised to determine its statistical significance towards SSC and suggestions for nursing implications based on the findings. The research concluded SSC is a safe and effective practice. It proved to increase thermoregulation, oxygenation, and cardiovascular and respiratory stability in full-term infants. As a cost-saving method, SSC was found to maintain vitals within normal parameters more effectively than modern-day equipment. Due to current standard care practices, SSC is an underutilized method that provides better health outcomes. Future nursing implications are based on education and policy change. Nursing education should work to familiarize the community and nursing staff on the proper technique and benefits of SSC. Education should drive SSC to becoming the first choice and standard of care for infant vital sign stabilization. Suggestions for further research included stricter regulation of the data collection process, including collection tools and controlled timing intervals.

Keywords:
skin to skin care
CINAHL Headings:
Kangaroo Care; Infant, Newborn; Vital Signs
Repository Posting Date:
5-Feb-2016
Date of Publication:
5-Feb-2016
Note:
This work has been approved through a peer-review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.
Grantor:
Nebraska Methodist College
Degree:
Master's

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typeThesisen
dc.evidence.levelLiterature Reviewen
dc.research.approachOtheren
dc.titleSkin-to-skin Contact After Birth to Promote Newborns' Vital Stabilization: An Evidence-Based Projecten_US
dc.contributor.authorBricker, Stephanieen
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Rachelen
dc.contributor.authorStom, Caitlinen
dc.contributor.departmentTau Tauen
dc.contributor.advisorSmallwood, Christopher J.en
dc.author.detailsStephanie Bricker, RN BSN, email: Stephanie.Bricker at methodistcollege dot edu; Rachel Johnson, RN, email: Rachel.Johnson at methodistcollege dot edu; Caitlin Stom, RN BSN, email: Caitlin.Stom at methodistcollege dot eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/595726en
dc.description.abstract<p><span><span><br /></span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;" dir="ltr"><span>Abstract</span></p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-9c5467cb-4167-fa7a-9971-97db3c4c5076"><span>The hours immediately following birth are a crucial time for an infant to sustain life. Skin-to-skin contact (SSC) during this time provides the infant with natural thermoregulation and promotes oxygenation. The purpose of this evidence-based project is to examine the physiological effects SSC has on full-term newborns. The research was centered around the PICOT question: In full term newborns, how does direct skin-to-skin contact, compared to no skin-to-skin contact, affect the stabilization of the infant as measured by the infant’s vital signs, when practiced within the first few hours after birth? Using terms related to the PICOT question, an extensive database search was completed in Cochrane, CINAHL, and ProQuest, yielding four articles for inclusion. Each article was critically appraised to determine its statistical significance towards SSC and suggestions for nursing implications based on the findings. The research concluded SSC is a safe and effective practice. It proved to increase thermoregulation, oxygenation, and cardiovascular and respiratory stability in full-term infants. As a cost-saving method, SSC was found to maintain vitals within normal parameters more effectively than modern-day equipment. Due to current standard care practices, SSC is an underutilized method that provides better health outcomes. Future nursing implications are based on education and policy change. Nursing education should work to familiarize the community and nursing staff on the proper technique and benefits of SSC. Education should drive SSC to becoming the first choice and standard of care for infant vital sign stabilization. Suggestions for further research included stricter regulation of the data collection process, including collection tools and controlled timing intervals. </span></span></p>en
dc.subjectskin to skin careen
dc.subject.cinahlKangaroo Careen
dc.subject.cinahlInfant, Newbornen
dc.subject.cinahlVital Signsen
dc.date.available2016-02-05T16:30:24Zen
dc.date.issued2016-02-05en
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-05T16:30:24Zen
dc.description.noteThis work has been approved through a peer-review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.en
thesis.degree.grantorNebraska Methodist Collegeen
thesis.degree.levelMaster'sen
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