The Use of Simulation to Facilitate a Successful Transition from Classroom to Initial Clinical Experience

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/600961
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
DNP Capstone Project
Level of Evidence:
Quasi-Experimental Study, Other
Research Approach:
Mixed/Multi Method Research
Title:
The Use of Simulation to Facilitate a Successful Transition from Classroom to Initial Clinical Experience
Author(s):
Hart, Julie, A.; Swenty, Constance, F.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Rho Theta
Author Details:
Julie A. Hart, MSN, RN, CNE, e-mail: hartj5 at nku dot edu; Constance F. Swenty, DNP, RN, CWOCN; e-mail: cfswenty at usi dot edu
Abstract:

Background/Significance of problem: As a practice profession, the clinical learning experience is an essential component of nursing education. Despite the importance of clinical education, students often describe the initial clinical experience as stressful and anxiety provoking.  High levels of stress and anxiety can impede students’ ability to learn. Students who have a negative initial clinical experience may choose to leave nursing education, perpetuating the nursing shortage.  Educators need evidence-based teaching strategies to facilitate a successful transition for beginning nursing students as they move from the classroom to the initial clinical experience.

 

Clinical question:  Will the use of a simulated clinical experience, utilizing standardized patients, prior to the initial clinical experience decrease students’ anxiety, increase students’ confidence, and increase students’ clinical competency once they enter the actual clinical environment?

 

Literature search: Quantitative and qualitative research studies identified the impact of initial clinical experiences on nursing students.

 

Best Evidence: The best evidence for facilitating the transition from classroom to initial clinical experience was identified as simulation, a widely supported teaching strategy.  Several studies suggested the use of simulated learning experiences could improve students’ self-confidence and competence with psychomotor skills. The use of standardized patients has been shown to increase learning when compared to traditional teaching strategies.

 

Integration into Practice:  Project outcomes and conclusions will be disseminated to provide nurse educators with evidence-based teaching strategies and to change nursing students’ orientation and preparation for initial clinical experiences. 

 

Evaluation of evidence-based practice: Quantitative data analysis did not show a statistically significant difference in anxiety scores or clinical skill competence between the control and simulation groups. However, 98.25% of the simulation group either “agreed” or “strongly agreed” they were confident they obtained skills from the simulation to perform necessary tasks in clinical.  Additionally, student comments from the reflective journal responses indicated participation in the simulation improved communication skills, decreased anxiety, and helped participants feel more prepared for the actual clinical experience.

 

 

Keywords:
Simulation; Standardized patients; Clinical learning; Transitions; Beginning nursing students; Teaching strategies
MeSH:
Patient Simulation; Students, Nursing; Teaching--methods
CINAHL Headings:
Simulations; Education, Clinical; Transitional Programs
Repository Posting Date:
8-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
8-Mar-2016
Note:
This work has been approved through a peer-review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.; This work has been approved through a peer-review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.; This item has been submitted to the repository as part of the University of Southern Indiana College of Nursing and Health Professions repository participation plan.
Grantor:
University of Southern Indiana
Degree:
DNP
Degree Year:
2016

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typeDNP Capstone Projecten
dc.evidence.levelQuasi-Experimental Study, Otheren
dc.research.approachMixed/Multi Method Researchen
dc.titleThe Use of Simulation to Facilitate a Successful Transition from Classroom to Initial Clinical Experienceen_US
dc.contributor.authorHart, Julie, A.en
dc.contributor.authorSwenty, Constance, F.en
dc.contributor.departmentRho Thetaen
dc.author.detailsJulie A. Hart, MSN, RN, CNE, e-mail: hartj5 at nku dot edu; Constance F. Swenty, DNP, RN, CWOCN; e-mail: cfswenty at usi dot eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/600961en
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Background/Significance of problem:</strong> As a practice profession, the clinical learning experience is an essential component of nursing education. Despite the importance of clinical education, students often describe the initial clinical experience as stressful and anxiety provoking.  High levels of stress and anxiety can impede students’ ability to learn. Students who have a negative initial clinical experience may choose to leave nursing education, perpetuating the nursing shortage.  Educators need evidence-based teaching strategies to facilitate a successful transition for beginning nursing students as they move from the classroom to the initial clinical experience.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Clinical question:  </strong>Will the use of a simulated clinical experience, utilizing standardized patients, prior to the initial clinical experience decrease students’ anxiety, increase students’ confidence, and increase students’ clinical competency once they enter the actual clinical environment?</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Literature search: </strong>Quantitative and qualitative research studies identified the impact of initial clinical experiences on nursing students.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Best Evidence: </strong>The best evidence for facilitating the transition from classroom to initial clinical experience was identified as simulation, a widely supported teaching strategy.  Several studies suggested the use of simulated learning experiences could improve students’ self-confidence and competence with psychomotor skills. The use of standardized patients has been shown to increase learning when compared to traditional teaching strategies.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Integration into Practice:  </strong>Project outcomes and conclusions will be disseminated to provide nurse educators with evidence-based teaching strategies and to change nursing students’ orientation and preparation for initial clinical experiences. </p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Evaluation of evidence-based practice:</strong> Quantitative data analysis did not show a statistically significant difference in anxiety scores or clinical skill competence between the control and simulation groups. However, 98.25% of the simulation group either “agreed” or “strongly agreed” they were confident they obtained skills from the simulation to perform necessary tasks in clinical.  Additionally, student comments from the reflective journal responses indicated participation in the simulation improved communication skills, decreased anxiety, and helped participants feel more prepared for the actual clinical experience.</p> <p> </p> <p> </p>en
dc.subjectSimulationen
dc.subjectStandardized patientsen
dc.subjectClinical learningen
dc.subjectTransitionsen
dc.subjectBeginning nursing studentsen
dc.subjectTeaching strategiesen
dc.subject.meshPatient Simulationen
dc.subject.meshStudents, Nursingen
dc.subject.meshTeaching--methodsen
dc.subject.cinahlSimulationsen
dc.subject.cinahlEducation, Clinicalen
dc.subject.cinahlTransitional Programsen
dc.date.available2016-03-08T17:43:45Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-08en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-08T17:43:45Zen
dc.description.noteThis work has been approved through a peer-review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.en
dc.description.noteThis work has been approved through a peer-review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.; This item has been submitted to the repository as part of the University of Southern Indiana College of Nursing and Health Professions repository participation plan.en
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Southern Indianaen
thesis.degree.levelDNPen
thesis.degree.year2016en
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