Parental Report of Sleep Problems among Preschool Children and Their Predictors

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601488
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Title:
Parental Report of Sleep Problems among Preschool Children and Their Predictors
Author(s):
Chang, Pi-Chen
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Lambda Beta-at-Large
Author Details:
Pi-Chen Chang, RN, pichen@tmu.edu.tw
Abstract:
Session presented on Friday, July 24, 2015: Purpose: Shortened child sleep duration has been identified as a 'risk factor' for poor child health outcomes like obesity. Identification of predictive factors for insufficient sleep may be helpful in developing interventions to change sleep health risk behaviors and for the purpose of preventing obesity in preschool populations. Preschool is the developmental stage of adopting health habits, thus it is an optimal time to promote healthy behaviors. Family is a health socialization unit and health habits aggregate within the family. Family is the major component of young children's social and environmental contexts, and therefore parents have strong influence on children health behaviors. In addition, the effectiveness of parents' socialization of their children will have an effect on their establishment, training, and enforcement of children's health behavior. Hence, the overall objective for this study is to identify parental report of sleep problems among preschool children and their predictors. Methods: The design of the research is descriptive correlational. A purposive sampling was used to recruit 178 preschool children and their parents. Chinese version of the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ) was used in identifying sleep problems. Measures assessing parents' and children' sleep hygiene, and parental sense of competence were included as potential predictors for sleep problems. Results: The mean sleep duration as reported by parents was M = 9.52 hours , SD = 1.03. The average bedtime was 9:31 PM. Co-sleeping was a common practice, with a prevalence of 96.6% (routine bed-sharing: 74.2%; room-sharing: 19.7%) in this sample of preschool children. In this study had 82.5% children's total score were greater than a cut-off score of 41 and might have sleep problem. Mean scores of total child sleep problems and bedtime resistance were higher among children co-sleeping with their parents than room-sharing or sleeping alone. Better parental sense of competence is related to less child sleep problems (r=-.28). Correlation between parent sleep hygiene and their child's sleep hygiene was .43 indicating parents' sleep practices have moderate effect on their children's sleep health behaviors. Twenty three percent of the variance in children's sleep problems was explained by measures of child sleep hygiene and parental sense of competence. Conclusion: The results of this study support that parental behaviors have significant effects on child sleep behaviors. The results will be used to help health professionals to understand sleep problems and its impact among preschool children for the improvement of quality of care.
Keywords:
sleep problems; preschool children
MeSH:
Parent-Child Relations
CINAHL Headings:
Sleep�Disorders--In Infancy and Childhood; Sleep--Evaluation--In Infancy and Childhood
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15PST43
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleParental Report of Sleep Problems among Preschool Children and Their Predictorsen
dc.contributor.authorChang, Pi-Chenen
dc.contributor.departmentLambda Beta-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsPi-Chen Chang, RN, pichen@tmu.edu.twen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601488-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Friday, July 24, 2015: Purpose: Shortened child sleep duration has been identified as a 'risk factor' for poor child health outcomes like obesity. Identification of predictive factors for insufficient sleep may be helpful in developing interventions to change sleep health risk behaviors and for the purpose of preventing obesity in preschool populations. Preschool is the developmental stage of adopting health habits, thus it is an optimal time to promote healthy behaviors. Family is a health socialization unit and health habits aggregate within the family. Family is the major component of young children's social and environmental contexts, and therefore parents have strong influence on children health behaviors. In addition, the effectiveness of parents' socialization of their children will have an effect on their establishment, training, and enforcement of children's health behavior. Hence, the overall objective for this study is to identify parental report of sleep problems among preschool children and their predictors. Methods: The design of the research is descriptive correlational. A purposive sampling was used to recruit 178 preschool children and their parents. Chinese version of the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ) was used in identifying sleep problems. Measures assessing parents' and children' sleep hygiene, and parental sense of competence were included as potential predictors for sleep problems. Results: The mean sleep duration as reported by parents was M = 9.52 hours , SD = 1.03. The average bedtime was 9:31 PM. Co-sleeping was a common practice, with a prevalence of 96.6% (routine bed-sharing: 74.2%; room-sharing: 19.7%) in this sample of preschool children. In this study had 82.5% children's total score were greater than a cut-off score of 41 and might have sleep problem. Mean scores of total child sleep problems and bedtime resistance were higher among children co-sleeping with their parents than room-sharing or sleeping alone. Better parental sense of competence is related to less child sleep problems (r=-.28). Correlation between parent sleep hygiene and their child's sleep hygiene was .43 indicating parents' sleep practices have moderate effect on their children's sleep health behaviors. Twenty three percent of the variance in children's sleep problems was explained by measures of child sleep hygiene and parental sense of competence. Conclusion: The results of this study support that parental behaviors have significant effects on child sleep behaviors. The results will be used to help health professionals to understand sleep problems and its impact among preschool children for the improvement of quality of care.en
dc.subjectsleep problemsen
dc.subjectpreschool childrenen
dc.subject.meshParent-Child Relationsen
dc.subject.cinahlSleep�Disorders--In Infancy and Childhooden
dc.subject.cinahlSleep--Evaluation--In Infancy and Childhooden
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:49:14Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:49:14Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.