19.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601500
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
At work - But not present
Author(s):
Christopher, Roberta
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Lambda Rho-at-Large
Author Details:
Roberta Christopher, Ed.D(c), MSN, ARNP, NE-BC, CHTS-CP
Abstract:
Have you ever been physically at work, but not fully present? This is called presenteesim. How might this lack of presence impact your safety, your patient's safety, and the quality of your nursing care? To better understand the relationship the relationship of presenteeism with absenteeism, nurse safety outcomes, and quality of nursing care, as perceived by nurses a quantitative research study was undertaken. This presentation will discuss key findings from the study. A description of patient safety outcomes, personal and contextual factors, and well-being assessment for productivity, which may influence presenteeism, absenteeism, nurse safety outcomes, and quality of nursing care will be discussed. The study to be discussed included a sample of 244 of actively licensed nurses working in direct patient care at two large academic medical centers located in northeast Florida. Data were gathered using a self-administered online survey. Study findings suggest there is a statistically significant positive relationship between presenteeism and quality of nursing care, a statistically significant negative relationship between presenteeism and absenteeism, and a statistically significant, negative difference in the proportion of nurses reporting presenteeism who experience the well-being work-related barrier of “lack of sufficient training.” Moreover, this study found a significant difference in the proportion of nurses reporting presenteeism who work in acute care healthcare facilities when compared to those who work in psychiatric healthcare facilities, and in the nurses reporting presenteesim who work in the critical care nursing specialty when compared to those who work in the psychiatric nursing specialty. There was no statistically significant relationship between presenteeism and nurse safety outcomes. A well-being learning approach to presenteeism for nurses provides a useful framework for the design, implementation, and evaluation of evidence-based interventions to reduce nurse presenteeism and absenteeism, enhance nurse and patient safety, and improve quality of care.
Keywords:
Presenteeism; Safety Outcomes
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
STTI Lambda Rho Chapter’s 2016 Nursing Research Conference
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing, Lambda Rho Chapter at Large
Conference Location:
Jacksonville, Florida, USA
Description:
Caring for a Diverse World

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleAt work - But not presenten
dc.contributor.authorChristopher, Robertaen
dc.contributor.departmentLambda Rho-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsRoberta Christopher, Ed.D(c), MSN, ARNP, NE-BC, CHTS-CPen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601500en
dc.description.abstractHave you ever been physically at work, but not fully present? This is called presenteesim. How might this lack of presence impact your safety, your patient's safety, and the quality of your nursing care? To better understand the relationship the relationship of presenteeism with absenteeism, nurse safety outcomes, and quality of nursing care, as perceived by nurses a quantitative research study was undertaken. This presentation will discuss key findings from the study. A description of patient safety outcomes, personal and contextual factors, and well-being assessment for productivity, which may influence presenteeism, absenteeism, nurse safety outcomes, and quality of nursing care will be discussed. The study to be discussed included a sample of 244 of actively licensed nurses working in direct patient care at two large academic medical centers located in northeast Florida. Data were gathered using a self-administered online survey. Study findings suggest there is a statistically significant positive relationship between presenteeism and quality of nursing care, a statistically significant negative relationship between presenteeism and absenteeism, and a statistically significant, negative difference in the proportion of nurses reporting presenteeism who experience the well-being work-related barrier of “lack of sufficient training.” Moreover, this study found a significant difference in the proportion of nurses reporting presenteeism who work in acute care healthcare facilities when compared to those who work in psychiatric healthcare facilities, and in the nurses reporting presenteesim who work in the critical care nursing specialty when compared to those who work in the psychiatric nursing specialty. There was no statistically significant relationship between presenteeism and nurse safety outcomes. A well-being learning approach to presenteeism for nurses provides a useful framework for the design, implementation, and evaluation of evidence-based interventions to reduce nurse presenteeism and absenteeism, enhance nurse and patient safety, and improve quality of care.en
dc.subjectPresenteeismen
dc.subjectSafety Outcomesen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T11:56:39Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T11:56:39Zen
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.nameSTTI Lambda Rho Chapter’s 2016 Nursing Research Conferenceen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing, Lambda Rho Chapter at Largeen
dc.conference.locationJacksonville, Florida, USAen
dc.descriptionCaring for a Diverse Worlden
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