Managing Dignity in Later Life: Global Influences, Personal Strategies, Cellular Effects

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601513
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Managing Dignity in Later Life: Global Influences, Personal Strategies, Cellular Effects
Author(s):
Jacelon, Cynthia S.; Walker, Rachel; Bosse, Jordan
Author Details:
Cynthia S. Jacelon, RN-BC, CRRN, FAAN, jacelon@nursing.umass.edu; Rachel Walker, PhD, RN, OCN; Jordon Bosse, MSN, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 25, 2015: Dignity is an inherent human characteristic and a dynamic, attributed part of the self is susceptible to human and environmental interaction. In the first paper we present an ecological model exploring the dignity of older adults as a form of resilient health potential to enhance well-being in later life. Through a synthesis of the literature we demonstrate how societal, community, family/interpersonal, and individual factors can combine to threaten the dignity of community-dwelling older adults. Chronic exposure to these threats can lead to maladaptive stress responses, cellular aging, pathological changes, and increased risk of mortality. In the second paper, we demonstrate the relationships among the factors of attributed dignity and health. Attributed dignity, measured by the Jacelon Attributed Dignity Scale (JADS), is a concept composed of four factors. It is a dynamic sense of self-value (SV), self in relation to others (SRO), perceived value from others (PVO), and behavior that demonstrates respect toward others (BRO). Using Semantic Equation Modeling (SEM), we found that PVO directly affected both SRO and BRO, and BRO directly affected SV. Self Value directly influenced mental health, and physical health indirectly. In the third paper, grounded theory was used to explore how older adults managed their dignity. Older individuals told stories of situations in which their dignity was supported or diminished and the strategies used to recover. Interactions that enhanced dignity were focused on the unique contributions of the older individual and included honor and respect from others. Interactions that diminished dignity included evidence of racism, classism, or ageism. The older individuals used introspective, active, and interactive strategies to mitigate threats to their dignity. By locating dignity within the context of an ecological model, then exploring how dignity affects mental and physical health, and finally how individuals manage dignity we identify the meaning of dignity in the later years.
Keywords:
structural equation modeling; older adult; dignity
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15E12
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleManaging Dignity in Later Life: Global Influences, Personal Strategies, Cellular Effectsen
dc.contributor.authorJacelon, Cynthia S.en
dc.contributor.authorWalker, Rachelen
dc.contributor.authorBosse, Jordanen
dc.author.detailsCynthia S. Jacelon, RN-BC, CRRN, FAAN, jacelon@nursing.umass.edu; Rachel Walker, PhD, RN, OCN; Jordon Bosse, MSN, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601513-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 25, 2015: Dignity is an inherent human characteristic and a dynamic, attributed part of the self is susceptible to human and environmental interaction. In the first paper we present an ecological model exploring the dignity of older adults as a form of resilient health potential to enhance well-being in later life. Through a synthesis of the literature we demonstrate how societal, community, family/interpersonal, and individual factors can combine to threaten the dignity of community-dwelling older adults. Chronic exposure to these threats can lead to maladaptive stress responses, cellular aging, pathological changes, and increased risk of mortality. In the second paper, we demonstrate the relationships among the factors of attributed dignity and health. Attributed dignity, measured by the Jacelon Attributed Dignity Scale (JADS), is a concept composed of four factors. It is a dynamic sense of self-value (SV), self in relation to others (SRO), perceived value from others (PVO), and behavior that demonstrates respect toward others (BRO). Using Semantic Equation Modeling (SEM), we found that PVO directly affected both SRO and BRO, and BRO directly affected SV. Self Value directly influenced mental health, and physical health indirectly. In the third paper, grounded theory was used to explore how older adults managed their dignity. Older individuals told stories of situations in which their dignity was supported or diminished and the strategies used to recover. Interactions that enhanced dignity were focused on the unique contributions of the older individual and included honor and respect from others. Interactions that diminished dignity included evidence of racism, classism, or ageism. The older individuals used introspective, active, and interactive strategies to mitigate threats to their dignity. By locating dignity within the context of an ecological model, then exploring how dignity affects mental and physical health, and finally how individuals manage dignity we identify the meaning of dignity in the later years.en
dc.subjectstructural equation modelingen
dc.subjectolder adulten
dc.subjectdignityen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:38:21Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:38:21Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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