2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601530
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Studying HCAHPS Scores and Patient Falls in the Context of Caring Science
Author(s):
Nichols, Tara; Hozak, Mary Ann; Nelson, John W.
Author Details:
Tara Nichols, RN, CCRN, CCNS, ACNS-BC, AGCNS-BC, TNichol1@hfhs.org; Mary Ann Hozak, RN, CCRN, hozakm@sjhmc.org; John Nelson, PhD, MS, BSN, jn@hcenvironment.com
Abstract:
Session presented on Sunday, July 26, 2015: This session includes two sub-sessions regarding examination of critical outcomes within care that were identified as both regulatory and financial stressors. Each organization used path analysis derived from a caring science research program to identify which critical outcomes could be studied within the building model of caring science research. Both studies are from acute care hospitals in the USA but have wide application across the globe, to any hospital seeking to improve outcomes within the context of caring science. Within the first path analysis, it was identified the patients perception of caring (using Watson's theory of caring) was impacted by staff who were clear in their professional role and the organizations' system which in turn supported creation of a work structure that they could successfully make the patient feel cared for. If the research model could reveal how the context of caring impacted the patient's report of caring, it seemed like a logical next step to show how this impacted patient satisfaction as measured by the HCAHPS scores. To most deeply understand the context and data relating to HCAHPS scores, a mixed method study was applied. The first of the three methods examined the relationship of caring, using Watson's theory of caring, with five slightly reworded HCAHPS questions (with permission of the CMS). HCAHPS questions address the patient's perception of pain, pain management, feeling listened to by staff, education on new medication and discharge instructions. The second method used a semi-structured interview of a panel of nine patients had been hospitalized in this hospital. Patients were selected for the panel because they had provided an HCAHPS score of 7 or 8 but not 9 or 10. It was desired to know where the hospital fell short in the patient reporting the highest scores of care. Finally, a secondary correlation analysis was conducted of HCAHPS scores from approximately 9,000 patients to understand if a profile high HCAHPS scores could be produced. Results provided a contextual understanding of HCAHPS. The second sub-session also used a path analysis within a caring science program to understand the structure of caring science data. This hospital, similar to the hospital studying HCAHPS in the first half of this session, used Relationship Based Care, Watson's Theory, and was an acute care hospital. The similar context may explain a similar model of staff who had clarity of role and system were also the staff who reported a good work environment (relationally and technically) to make the patient feel cared for. However, this study has some unique behavior in the staff data and subsequent path analysis that encouraged conversation of what might be missing in the model of research. This process of respecification of the model revealed the concept of civility needed to be added as it was suspected the lack of civility (may be referred to as bullying) in some areas of the hospital was impacted the path analysis. The theory of civility proposed by Kathleen Bartholomew was used to study if civility did fit in this model and thus explain some of the variation in these data that had a context very similar to the hospital that studies the HCAHPS scores. Presenters of this study will review the civility, or lack of it, discovered in the hospital staff and how this impacted the model. Presenters will also review what actions were taken to address operationally what was discovered within this research.
Keywords:
Civility; Patient satisfaction; Watson's theory of caring
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15H06
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleStudying HCAHPS Scores and Patient Falls in the Context of Caring Scienceen
dc.contributor.authorNichols, Taraen
dc.contributor.authorHozak, Mary Annen
dc.contributor.authorNelson, John W.en
dc.author.detailsTara Nichols, RN, CCRN, CCNS, ACNS-BC, AGCNS-BC, TNichol1@hfhs.org; Mary Ann Hozak, RN, CCRN, hozakm@sjhmc.org; John Nelson, PhD, MS, BSN, jn@hcenvironment.comen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601530-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Sunday, July 26, 2015: This session includes two sub-sessions regarding examination of critical outcomes within care that were identified as both regulatory and financial stressors. Each organization used path analysis derived from a caring science research program to identify which critical outcomes could be studied within the building model of caring science research. Both studies are from acute care hospitals in the USA but have wide application across the globe, to any hospital seeking to improve outcomes within the context of caring science. Within the first path analysis, it was identified the patients perception of caring (using Watson's theory of caring) was impacted by staff who were clear in their professional role and the organizations' system which in turn supported creation of a work structure that they could successfully make the patient feel cared for. If the research model could reveal how the context of caring impacted the patient's report of caring, it seemed like a logical next step to show how this impacted patient satisfaction as measured by the HCAHPS scores. To most deeply understand the context and data relating to HCAHPS scores, a mixed method study was applied. The first of the three methods examined the relationship of caring, using Watson's theory of caring, with five slightly reworded HCAHPS questions (with permission of the CMS). HCAHPS questions address the patient's perception of pain, pain management, feeling listened to by staff, education on new medication and discharge instructions. The second method used a semi-structured interview of a panel of nine patients had been hospitalized in this hospital. Patients were selected for the panel because they had provided an HCAHPS score of 7 or 8 but not 9 or 10. It was desired to know where the hospital fell short in the patient reporting the highest scores of care. Finally, a secondary correlation analysis was conducted of HCAHPS scores from approximately 9,000 patients to understand if a profile high HCAHPS scores could be produced. Results provided a contextual understanding of HCAHPS. The second sub-session also used a path analysis within a caring science program to understand the structure of caring science data. This hospital, similar to the hospital studying HCAHPS in the first half of this session, used Relationship Based Care, Watson's Theory, and was an acute care hospital. The similar context may explain a similar model of staff who had clarity of role and system were also the staff who reported a good work environment (relationally and technically) to make the patient feel cared for. However, this study has some unique behavior in the staff data and subsequent path analysis that encouraged conversation of what might be missing in the model of research. This process of respecification of the model revealed the concept of civility needed to be added as it was suspected the lack of civility (may be referred to as bullying) in some areas of the hospital was impacted the path analysis. The theory of civility proposed by Kathleen Bartholomew was used to study if civility did fit in this model and thus explain some of the variation in these data that had a context very similar to the hospital that studies the HCAHPS scores. Presenters of this study will review the civility, or lack of it, discovered in the hospital staff and how this impacted the model. Presenters will also review what actions were taken to address operationally what was discovered within this research.en
dc.subjectCivilityen
dc.subjectPatient satisfactionen
dc.subjectWatson's theory of caringen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:38:52Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:38:52Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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