2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601537
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Connecting Nurse Faculty: International Networking Opportunities
Author(s):
Howard, Matthew S.; Woodward, Kayla; Bruce, Judith; Nolan, Marie T.
Author Details:
Matthew S. Howard, RN, CEN, CPEN, CPN, matthew@stti.org; Kayla Woodward, MPA, kayla@stti.org; Judith Bruce, PhD, RN, judith.bruce@wits.ac.za; Marie T. Nolan, PhD, RN, FAAN, mnolan3@jhu.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Sunday, July 26, 2015: Global bodies such as the World Health Organization have developed global standards for nursing and midwifery education to improve the quality of nursing education and create paths for professional advancement in line with worldwide education trends (WHO, 2009). Despite this general consensus to establish basic global standards, there are many challenges to doing so in each country, such as variations in the development of practice, competency, and regulatory and legal standards (Huston, 2009). We live in an increasingly global society that gives nurses the ability to connect with other nurses and healthcare professionals all over the world. Globalization has removed international boundaries and provides endless opportunities for connecting and sharing expertise. 'Improvements in information technology and communication systems, and the Internet in particular (an example of transnational activity), have facilitated the rapid and extensive exchange of information, expertise and ideas across international communities, resulting in the widespread creation and dissemination of knowledge (Freshwater, 2006).' Globalization trends have strengthened communications among nurses and nursing organizations internationally. Enhancing nursing knowledge requires the exchange of ideas and collaboration amongst nurses. Opportunities to connect globally are now readily available and offer faculty a means to search for and implement the best curricula without the need to invest major resources. These opportunities to nursing enhance the knowledge and experience of nurse faculty, as well as those of their students are essential. Creating this global infrastructure is even more important in countries where resources are limited and highly skilled and educated workers are scarce. This session will introduce participants to three forums that allow faculty to collaborate with their global colleagues, enhance their professional relationships, and exchange ideas in order to advance the profession. These forums include the International Academic Nursing Alliance (IANA), International Network for Doctoral Education in Nursing (INDEN), and the International Council of Nurses Education Network (ICNEN). IANA, hosted by the Honor Society of Nursing, Sigma Theta Tau International, is a resource for those with a vested interest in nursing education to provide recommended education and collaboration opportunities for nurse faculty. IANA's mission is to establish a global electronic network of nursing educators linking resources and information from schools of nursing that facilitate collaborations, exchanges, mentoring opportunities, research and faculty development. This innovative, virtual, free, collaborative Alliance allows educators and schools of nursing around the world to promote scholarship and excellence in nursing education by sharing information, resources, and opportunities in an extensive range of areas. For example, users recently engaged on nursing student attrition and retention strategies. INDEN is a non-profit professional association dedicated to the advancement of quality doctoral nursing education globally. Beginning in 1995 during the Doctoral Forum in Nursing hosted by the University of Michigan School of Nursing, this network has grown to become a large organization dedicated to advancing doctoral education in nursing. The network maintains quality indicators and guidelines for doctoral education and collaborates with multiple countries to confirm the indicators are relevant throughout the world. INDEN has charged itself with pursuing opportunities to exchange ideas between nurse educators and doctoral students from around the world to generate substantive nursing knowledge that is globally relevant. The ICNEN was established by the International Council of Nurses (ICN) to address the critical issues of the worldwide nursing shortage, the advances in communication technology and the preparation of a diverse nursing workforce worldwide. Officially launched in Durban, South Africa during the ICN's 24th Quadrennial Congress, 2 July 2009, the network's mission is to provide a global forum for nursing educators to discuss issues and disseminate knowledge and ideas. Like IANA, ICNEN requires no membership fee and is open to all individuals who are nurse educators or those interested in nursing education.
Keywords:
Nursing Faculty; International Education; Collaboration
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15I17
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleConnecting Nurse Faculty: International Networking Opportunitiesen
dc.contributor.authorHoward, Matthew S.en
dc.contributor.authorWoodward, Kaylaen
dc.contributor.authorBruce, Judithen
dc.contributor.authorNolan, Marie T.en
dc.author.detailsMatthew S. Howard, RN, CEN, CPEN, CPN, matthew@stti.org; Kayla Woodward, MPA, kayla@stti.org; Judith Bruce, PhD, RN, judith.bruce@wits.ac.za; Marie T. Nolan, PhD, RN, FAAN, mnolan3@jhu.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601537-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Sunday, July 26, 2015: Global bodies such as the World Health Organization have developed global standards for nursing and midwifery education to improve the quality of nursing education and create paths for professional advancement in line with worldwide education trends (WHO, 2009). Despite this general consensus to establish basic global standards, there are many challenges to doing so in each country, such as variations in the development of practice, competency, and regulatory and legal standards (Huston, 2009). We live in an increasingly global society that gives nurses the ability to connect with other nurses and healthcare professionals all over the world. Globalization has removed international boundaries and provides endless opportunities for connecting and sharing expertise. 'Improvements in information technology and communication systems, and the Internet in particular (an example of transnational activity), have facilitated the rapid and extensive exchange of information, expertise and ideas across international communities, resulting in the widespread creation and dissemination of knowledge (Freshwater, 2006).' Globalization trends have strengthened communications among nurses and nursing organizations internationally. Enhancing nursing knowledge requires the exchange of ideas and collaboration amongst nurses. Opportunities to connect globally are now readily available and offer faculty a means to search for and implement the best curricula without the need to invest major resources. These opportunities to nursing enhance the knowledge and experience of nurse faculty, as well as those of their students are essential. Creating this global infrastructure is even more important in countries where resources are limited and highly skilled and educated workers are scarce. This session will introduce participants to three forums that allow faculty to collaborate with their global colleagues, enhance their professional relationships, and exchange ideas in order to advance the profession. These forums include the International Academic Nursing Alliance (IANA), International Network for Doctoral Education in Nursing (INDEN), and the International Council of Nurses Education Network (ICNEN). IANA, hosted by the Honor Society of Nursing, Sigma Theta Tau International, is a resource for those with a vested interest in nursing education to provide recommended education and collaboration opportunities for nurse faculty. IANA's mission is to establish a global electronic network of nursing educators linking resources and information from schools of nursing that facilitate collaborations, exchanges, mentoring opportunities, research and faculty development. This innovative, virtual, free, collaborative Alliance allows educators and schools of nursing around the world to promote scholarship and excellence in nursing education by sharing information, resources, and opportunities in an extensive range of areas. For example, users recently engaged on nursing student attrition and retention strategies. INDEN is a non-profit professional association dedicated to the advancement of quality doctoral nursing education globally. Beginning in 1995 during the Doctoral Forum in Nursing hosted by the University of Michigan School of Nursing, this network has grown to become a large organization dedicated to advancing doctoral education in nursing. The network maintains quality indicators and guidelines for doctoral education and collaborates with multiple countries to confirm the indicators are relevant throughout the world. INDEN has charged itself with pursuing opportunities to exchange ideas between nurse educators and doctoral students from around the world to generate substantive nursing knowledge that is globally relevant. The ICNEN was established by the International Council of Nurses (ICN) to address the critical issues of the worldwide nursing shortage, the advances in communication technology and the preparation of a diverse nursing workforce worldwide. Officially launched in Durban, South Africa during the ICN's 24th Quadrennial Congress, 2 July 2009, the network's mission is to provide a global forum for nursing educators to discuss issues and disseminate knowledge and ideas. Like IANA, ICNEN requires no membership fee and is open to all individuals who are nurse educators or those interested in nursing education.en
dc.subjectNursing Facultyen
dc.subjectInternational Educationen
dc.subjectCollaborationen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:39:05Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:39:05Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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