2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601566
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Title:
Hispanics' Health Care Literacy: Language Barrier or Educational Barrier?
Author(s):
Munoz, Anahi Penelope; Pedroso, Denia
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Phi Pi
Author Details:
Anahi Penelope Munoz, FNP, RN, amunoz@chamberlain.edu; Denia Pedroso, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 25, 2015: Title: Hispanics' health care literacy: language barrier or educational barrier? Objectives: Determine that health care illiteracy among the Hispanic population is related to factors others than language barrier.Provide health care education and information among the South Florida Hispanic population through utilization of television media. Purpose: Improve health care literacy among the South Florida Hispanic population through implementation of televised health care education. Background:Health literacy is described as the ability to acquire, process, and understand basic health information and services to make suitable health care decisions (Berkman, Sheridan, Donahue, Halpern & Crotty, 2011). Health literacy depends on the context. Even people with strong literacy skills can face health literacy challenges, such as when: people are not familiar with medical terms or how their bodies work; and when they are diagnosed with a serious illness and are scared or confused. According to Singleton and Krause (2009) only 12 percent of U.S. adults had proficient health literacy, 77 million adult people have difficulty with common health tasks, such as following directions on a prescription drug label. Limited health literacy affects adults in all racial and ethnic groups. However, 65 percent of Hispanic adults present with basic or below basic health literacy range what represent a significant portion of the population compared with 28 percent of white adults presenting with same issue. Hispanics have lower levels of health literacy than non-Hispanics, and much of their health information comes from sources other than their health care providers (Elder, Ayala, Parra-Medina & Talavera, 2009). Among Hispanics, Mexicans and Central Americans are most likely (30%) to report having received no health information from their doctors, followed by South Americans (29%), Dominicans (25%), Cubans (22%), Puerto Ricans (19%), and all other Hispanic subgroups (16%). Therefore, Two-thirds (69%) of Latinos reported receiving health information from television. In addition, 51% of all Latinos receive health information from newspapers, 40% from radio, and 35% from the Internet. Majority of Latinos obtained health information from television or the radio report receiving it in Spanish or a mix of Spanish and English (Britigan, Murnan & Rojas-Guyler, 2009). SignificanceLow rates of health literacy is a nationwide problem linked to poor health care outcomes such as higher rates of re-hospitalization and lower adherence to medical treatments regimens, are more prominent among Hispanics than non- Hispanics. MethodCross sectional study using an internet questionnaire survey will be implemented asking to adult Hispanics individuals in South Florida from where they mainly acquired their health care information. Additionally, questions to determine level of health care literacy pre and post intervention will be included in the survey. References: Berkman, N. D., Sheridan, S. L., Donahue, K. E., Halpern, D. J., & Crotty, K. (2011). Low health literacy and health outcomes: an updated systematic review. Annals of internal medicine, 155(2), 97-107. Singleton, K., & Krause, E. (2009). Understanding cultural and linguistic barriers to health literacy. OJIN: The online journal of issues in nursing, 14(3), 11. Britigan, D. H., Murnan, J., & Rojas-Guyler, L. (2009). A qualitative study examining Latino functional health literacy levels and sources of health information. Journal of community health, 34(3), 222-230. Elder, J. P., Ayala, G. X., Parra-Medina, D., & Talavera, G. A. (2009). Health communication in the Latino community: issues and approaches. Annual review of public health, 30(1), 227-251.
Keywords:
health literacy; educational level; immigrant, Hispanic, community
MeSH:
Hispanic Americans; Health Literacy; Communication Barriers
CINAHL Headings:
Hispanics
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15PST212
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleHispanics' Health Care Literacy: Language Barrier or Educational Barrier?en
dc.contributor.authorMunoz, Anahi Penelopeen
dc.contributor.authorPedroso, Deniaen
dc.contributor.departmentPhi Pien
dc.author.detailsAnahi Penelope Munoz, FNP, RN, amunoz@chamberlain.edu; Denia Pedroso, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601566-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 25, 2015: Title: Hispanics' health care literacy: language barrier or educational barrier? Objectives: Determine that health care illiteracy among the Hispanic population is related to factors others than language barrier.Provide health care education and information among the South Florida Hispanic population through utilization of television media. Purpose: Improve health care literacy among the South Florida Hispanic population through implementation of televised health care education. Background:Health literacy is described as the ability to acquire, process, and understand basic health information and services to make suitable health care decisions (Berkman, Sheridan, Donahue, Halpern & Crotty, 2011). Health literacy depends on the context. Even people with strong literacy skills can face health literacy challenges, such as when: people are not familiar with medical terms or how their bodies work; and when they are diagnosed with a serious illness and are scared or confused. According to Singleton and Krause (2009) only 12 percent of U.S. adults had proficient health literacy, 77 million adult people have difficulty with common health tasks, such as following directions on a prescription drug label. Limited health literacy affects adults in all racial and ethnic groups. However, 65 percent of Hispanic adults present with basic or below basic health literacy range what represent a significant portion of the population compared with 28 percent of white adults presenting with same issue. Hispanics have lower levels of health literacy than non-Hispanics, and much of their health information comes from sources other than their health care providers (Elder, Ayala, Parra-Medina & Talavera, 2009). Among Hispanics, Mexicans and Central Americans are most likely (30%) to report having received no health information from their doctors, followed by South Americans (29%), Dominicans (25%), Cubans (22%), Puerto Ricans (19%), and all other Hispanic subgroups (16%). Therefore, Two-thirds (69%) of Latinos reported receiving health information from television. In addition, 51% of all Latinos receive health information from newspapers, 40% from radio, and 35% from the Internet. Majority of Latinos obtained health information from television or the radio report receiving it in Spanish or a mix of Spanish and English (Britigan, Murnan & Rojas-Guyler, 2009). SignificanceLow rates of health literacy is a nationwide problem linked to poor health care outcomes such as higher rates of re-hospitalization and lower adherence to medical treatments regimens, are more prominent among Hispanics than non- Hispanics. MethodCross sectional study using an internet questionnaire survey will be implemented asking to adult Hispanics individuals in South Florida from where they mainly acquired their health care information. Additionally, questions to determine level of health care literacy pre and post intervention will be included in the survey. References: Berkman, N. D., Sheridan, S. L., Donahue, K. E., Halpern, D. J., & Crotty, K. (2011). Low health literacy and health outcomes: an updated systematic review. Annals of internal medicine, 155(2), 97-107. Singleton, K., & Krause, E. (2009). Understanding cultural and linguistic barriers to health literacy. OJIN: The online journal of issues in nursing, 14(3), 11. Britigan, D. H., Murnan, J., & Rojas-Guyler, L. (2009). A qualitative study examining Latino functional health literacy levels and sources of health information. Journal of community health, 34(3), 222-230. Elder, J. P., Ayala, G. X., Parra-Medina, D., & Talavera, G. A. (2009). Health communication in the Latino community: issues and approaches. Annual review of public health, 30(1), 227-251.en
dc.subjecthealth literacyen
dc.subjecteducational levelen
dc.subjectimmigrant, Hispanic, communityen
dc.subject.meshHispanic Americansen
dc.subject.meshHealth Literacyen
dc.subject.meshCommunication Barriersen
dc.subject.cinahlHispanicsen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:49:51Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:49:51Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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