The Nurse Educators Perspectives of Clinical Teaching in the Skills Laboratory: A Malawian Experience

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601571
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Title:
The Nurse Educators Perspectives of Clinical Teaching in the Skills Laboratory: A Malawian Experience
Author(s):
Bruce, Judith C.; Msosa, Annie N.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Tau Lambda-at-Large
Author Details:
Judith C. Bruce, PhD, RN, RM, Judith.Bruce@wits.ac.za; Annie N. Msosa, RN, CNM
Abstract:
Session presented on Friday, July 24, 2015: Purpose: Clinical skills laboratories continue to be an essential component of clinical teaching and learning in nurse education globally including the country of Malawi. As in many other developing countries, Malawi adopted the use of the skills laboratory through research findings and benchmarking from the well developed countries. The skills laboratory has been operational for more than ten years. However, it is not known how the clinical teaching and learning is taking place. In addition, much has been learned from developed countries but not much is known on how clinical teaching is progressing in many nursing institutions from the developing countries including Malawi. The aim of the study was to evaluate clinical teaching and learning of undergraduate nursing students in the skills laboratories from a developing world perspective. The purpose was to explore and determine nurse educators' perspectives of clinical teaching and learning in college-based skills laboratories. Methods: In 2013 six in-depth interviews from nurse educators and clinical supervisors were conducted at the two campuses of Kamuzu College of Nursing in Malawi. From these interviews the factors and issues that affect students' clinical learning and use of the skills laboratory were extrapolated. Using a semi-structured interview guide, the participants were questioned on how teaching and learning is perceived, issues that affect clinical teaching and the areas that need modification for effective clinical teaching in the college-based skills laboratories. Data were organized and managed using the MAXQDA software version 11 and analysed thematically.' Results: The findings show that demonstrations and return demonstrations are the practical necessities of clinical teaching that enrich clinical teaching experiences. The skills laboratory has better resources than the various practical sites and therefore it provides a better learning environment for undergraduate nursing students. Nurse educators perceive that it is stressful to conduct demonstrations and observe the return demonstrations due to the increased student numbers and limited resources available in the skills laboratory. There is also variation in the use of the skills laboratory by the junior and senior students. Junior students use the skills laboratory more than the senior because the senior students gain their experiences in the practical sites far from the college. 'The need for nurse educators to work in shifts in the skills laboratory to create more opportunities for students to use the skills laboratory during their free time and when the lecturers are busy with other commitments, has been emphasised. Increasing the practice sessions, teaching resources and nurse educators is advocated to ensure effective clinical teaching. The findings also advocate the purchase of portable teaching resources for students who are allocated in various practical sites away from the college-based laboratories. Finally, a suggestion for a mentor-mentee program is made for graduates during the first two years of their working experience. However, in Malawi students are often alone in the work settings soon after graduation. It is possible that the staff shortage, due to nurse migration may preclude the development of this type of program. Conclusion: These results suggest that strengthening the students clinical teaching in the skills laboratories is the most realistic strategy in developing countries
Keywords:
Nurse Educators; Skills Laboratory; Clinical Teaching
CINAHL Headings:
Education, Clinical; Faculty, Nursing; Learning´┐ŻLaboratories; Simulations; Malawi
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15PST92
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleThe Nurse Educators Perspectives of Clinical Teaching in the Skills Laboratory: A Malawian Experienceen
dc.contributor.authorBruce, Judith C.en
dc.contributor.authorMsosa, Annie N.en
dc.contributor.departmentTau Lambda-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsJudith C. Bruce, PhD, RN, RM, Judith.Bruce@wits.ac.za; Annie N. Msosa, RN, CNMen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601571-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Friday, July 24, 2015: Purpose: Clinical skills laboratories continue to be an essential component of clinical teaching and learning in nurse education globally including the country of Malawi. As in many other developing countries, Malawi adopted the use of the skills laboratory through research findings and benchmarking from the well developed countries. The skills laboratory has been operational for more than ten years. However, it is not known how the clinical teaching and learning is taking place. In addition, much has been learned from developed countries but not much is known on how clinical teaching is progressing in many nursing institutions from the developing countries including Malawi. The aim of the study was to evaluate clinical teaching and learning of undergraduate nursing students in the skills laboratories from a developing world perspective. The purpose was to explore and determine nurse educators' perspectives of clinical teaching and learning in college-based skills laboratories. Methods: In 2013 six in-depth interviews from nurse educators and clinical supervisors were conducted at the two campuses of Kamuzu College of Nursing in Malawi. From these interviews the factors and issues that affect students' clinical learning and use of the skills laboratory were extrapolated. Using a semi-structured interview guide, the participants were questioned on how teaching and learning is perceived, issues that affect clinical teaching and the areas that need modification for effective clinical teaching in the college-based skills laboratories. Data were organized and managed using the MAXQDA software version 11 and analysed thematically.' Results: The findings show that demonstrations and return demonstrations are the practical necessities of clinical teaching that enrich clinical teaching experiences. The skills laboratory has better resources than the various practical sites and therefore it provides a better learning environment for undergraduate nursing students. Nurse educators perceive that it is stressful to conduct demonstrations and observe the return demonstrations due to the increased student numbers and limited resources available in the skills laboratory. There is also variation in the use of the skills laboratory by the junior and senior students. Junior students use the skills laboratory more than the senior because the senior students gain their experiences in the practical sites far from the college. 'The need for nurse educators to work in shifts in the skills laboratory to create more opportunities for students to use the skills laboratory during their free time and when the lecturers are busy with other commitments, has been emphasised. Increasing the practice sessions, teaching resources and nurse educators is advocated to ensure effective clinical teaching. The findings also advocate the purchase of portable teaching resources for students who are allocated in various practical sites away from the college-based laboratories. Finally, a suggestion for a mentor-mentee program is made for graduates during the first two years of their working experience. However, in Malawi students are often alone in the work settings soon after graduation. It is possible that the staff shortage, due to nurse migration may preclude the development of this type of program. Conclusion: These results suggest that strengthening the students clinical teaching in the skills laboratories is the most realistic strategy in developing countriesen
dc.subjectNurse Educatorsen
dc.subjectSkills Laboratoryen
dc.subjectClinical Teachingen
dc.subject.cinahlEducation, Clinicalen
dc.subject.cinahlFaculty, Nursingen
dc.subject.cinahlLearning´┐ŻLaboratoriesen
dc.subject.cinahlSimulationsen
dc.subject.cinahlMalawien
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:50:00Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:50:00Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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