Cancer Pain Treatment Differences in a Matched Sample of Older African-American and European-American Hospice Patients at the End-of-Life

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601622
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Title:
Cancer Pain Treatment Differences in a Matched Sample of Older African-American and European-American Hospice Patients at the End-of-Life
Author(s):
Booker, Staja Q.; Herr, Keela; McCarthy, Ann Marie
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Beta Sigma
Author Details:
Staja Q. Booker, RN, staja-booker@uiowa.edu; Keela Herr, PhD, RN,'FAAN, AGSF; Ann Marie McCarthy, RN, FAAN
Abstract:
Session presented on Sunday, July 26, 2015: Differences in the experience and treatment of cancer pain between African American and European American adults in community settings are noted in the literature. However, little is known about the treatment experience of older African Americans and European Americans in hospice settings at the end-of-life. Evidence shows that African Americans utilize hospice services less often, and report higher cancer pain intensities but receive less optimal treatment despite the availability of best practices for cancer pain management. The purpose of this study is to determine if there are differences in best practice cancer pain treatments in a matched sample of older African Americans and European Americans in hospice at the end-of-life. To determine this we asked the following questions: Are there racial differences in non-drug and pharmacological treatments ordered and taken? Are there differences in implementation of best practices for cancer pain treatment? 'To answer these questions, we will conduct a secondary data analysis of a robust data set from a translating research into practice (TRIP) cancer pain management intervention study. Our sample includes 134 older African American and European American hospice patients with various types of cancer matched by age ('1 year) and sex. Based on the literature, we hypothesize that there are differences in pain intensity, treatments ordered and taken, and implementation of evidence-based practices for cancer pain management between African Americans and European Americans.
Keywords:
cancer pain treatment; African Americans; European (Caucasian) Americans
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15PST485
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleCancer Pain Treatment Differences in a Matched Sample of Older African-American and European-American Hospice Patients at the End-of-Lifeen
dc.contributor.authorBooker, Staja Q.en
dc.contributor.authorHerr, Keelaen
dc.contributor.authorMcCarthy, Ann Marieen
dc.contributor.departmentBeta Sigmaen
dc.author.detailsStaja Q. Booker, RN, staja-booker@uiowa.edu; Keela Herr, PhD, RN,'FAAN, AGSF; Ann Marie McCarthy, RN, FAANen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601622-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Sunday, July 26, 2015: Differences in the experience and treatment of cancer pain between African American and European American adults in community settings are noted in the literature. However, little is known about the treatment experience of older African Americans and European Americans in hospice settings at the end-of-life. Evidence shows that African Americans utilize hospice services less often, and report higher cancer pain intensities but receive less optimal treatment despite the availability of best practices for cancer pain management. The purpose of this study is to determine if there are differences in best practice cancer pain treatments in a matched sample of older African Americans and European Americans in hospice at the end-of-life. To determine this we asked the following questions: Are there racial differences in non-drug and pharmacological treatments ordered and taken? Are there differences in implementation of best practices for cancer pain treatment? 'To answer these questions, we will conduct a secondary data analysis of a robust data set from a translating research into practice (TRIP) cancer pain management intervention study. Our sample includes 134 older African American and European American hospice patients with various types of cancer matched by age ('1 year) and sex. Based on the literature, we hypothesize that there are differences in pain intensity, treatments ordered and taken, and implementation of evidence-based practices for cancer pain management between African Americans and European Americans.en
dc.subjectcancer pain treatmenten
dc.subjectAfrican Americansen
dc.subjectEuropean (Caucasian) Americansen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:50:59Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:50:59Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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