What Challenges and Experiences Do Immigrant Turkish Muslim Women Face When Acquiring Healthcare in America?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601625
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Title:
What Challenges and Experiences Do Immigrant Turkish Muslim Women Face When Acquiring Healthcare in America?
Author(s):
Hackett, Janna
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Iota Mu
Author Details:
Janna Hackett, RN, janna.hackett@clovis.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Sunday, July 26, 2015: Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine Turkish Muslim immigrants' perspectives of the care received in the United States with emphasis on actions to improve cultural acceptance and understanding.' Integration of transcultural nursing research enhances the provision of culturally competent, equitable care. Methods: The study was conducted using a simple questionnaire based on available literature for Turkish Islamic women through the Raindrop Turkish House in Lubbock, Texas.' Demographic data was attained including age, primary language spoken in the home, marital status, year moved to the U.S., highest level of education and Islamic denomination.' Subsequently, questions were provided using a 7-point Likert scale to determine general information regarding healthcare perceptions.' Successively, discussion occurred through two semi-directed focus group(s) for the participants to share experiences and respond to short, simple qualitative questions regarding personal experiences and perceptions.' One female translator was chosen based upon bilingualism and willingness to assist with the study.' The translator is also a member of the Turkish Raindrop House and is a Turkish Muslim woman.' She is an expert regarding Turkish-English translation and has experience teaching Turkish to English-speaking persons.' All individuals who participated spoke English and/or Turkish dialects translatable by this interpreter.' ''''''''' A modification of Whelan's 'Rapid Bilingual Appraisal Model' (Whelan, 2004) was used in real-time for information attained via female translator for all participants who did not speak English.' Focus groups were recorded and their responses subsequently transcribed.' The translator spoke English translations to the researcher to enhance the richness of the experiences and intercultural dialog.' The translator examined the transcripts for cultural and literal meanings.'' Each participant was carefully screened and voluntarily signed both an established, Institutional Review Board (IRB)- approved Consent Form and a separate Confidentiality Statement.' IRB approval was attained in advance for this study.' Final sample size was five Turkish Muslim Immigrant women (n=5).' Results: Several findings reflected positive perceptions with most of the women reporting that nurses and doctors do not treat them differently due to race or religion.' Participants primarily reported preferring health care workers to ask them about their beliefs when receiving care and all participants agreed that they would prefer a female health care worker.'' Most respondents reported that their husbands know the most about family healthcare needs and make the family health care decisions though consent for treatments and procedures is discussed and agreed upon between the spouses.' The strongest survey responses occurred regarding the importance of eating only halal foods when hospitalized. Conclusion: :' Overall, the majority of the participants reported feeling comfortable with many aspects of the American healthcare system.' In Focus Group A, one participant stated that in Lubbock people are very welcoming and no-one treats her badly. The other group participants smiled and agreed.' Another participant stated, 'Things are very good here'.' It is beneficial to recognize the responsive, transcultural care provided by many healthcare workers.' Despite these findings, it is also imperative to recognize that one respondent reported feelings of discomfort and judgmental treatment.' Respect and impartiality are key issues when assisting patients of different cultures, backgrounds and experiences.' Healthcare workers must be aware of patient perceptions to improve the health and well-being of Muslim women in global communities.
Keywords:
Transcultural Care; Muslim Immigrant Women; Research Poster
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15PST445
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleWhat Challenges and Experiences Do Immigrant Turkish Muslim Women Face When Acquiring Healthcare in America?en
dc.contributor.authorHackett, Jannaen
dc.contributor.departmentIota Muen
dc.author.detailsJanna Hackett, RN, janna.hackett@clovis.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601625-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Sunday, July 26, 2015: Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine Turkish Muslim immigrants' perspectives of the care received in the United States with emphasis on actions to improve cultural acceptance and understanding.' Integration of transcultural nursing research enhances the provision of culturally competent, equitable care. Methods: The study was conducted using a simple questionnaire based on available literature for Turkish Islamic women through the Raindrop Turkish House in Lubbock, Texas.' Demographic data was attained including age, primary language spoken in the home, marital status, year moved to the U.S., highest level of education and Islamic denomination.' Subsequently, questions were provided using a 7-point Likert scale to determine general information regarding healthcare perceptions.' Successively, discussion occurred through two semi-directed focus group(s) for the participants to share experiences and respond to short, simple qualitative questions regarding personal experiences and perceptions.' One female translator was chosen based upon bilingualism and willingness to assist with the study.' The translator is also a member of the Turkish Raindrop House and is a Turkish Muslim woman.' She is an expert regarding Turkish-English translation and has experience teaching Turkish to English-speaking persons.' All individuals who participated spoke English and/or Turkish dialects translatable by this interpreter.' ''''''''' A modification of Whelan's 'Rapid Bilingual Appraisal Model' (Whelan, 2004) was used in real-time for information attained via female translator for all participants who did not speak English.' Focus groups were recorded and their responses subsequently transcribed.' The translator spoke English translations to the researcher to enhance the richness of the experiences and intercultural dialog.' The translator examined the transcripts for cultural and literal meanings.'' Each participant was carefully screened and voluntarily signed both an established, Institutional Review Board (IRB)- approved Consent Form and a separate Confidentiality Statement.' IRB approval was attained in advance for this study.' Final sample size was five Turkish Muslim Immigrant women (n=5).' Results: Several findings reflected positive perceptions with most of the women reporting that nurses and doctors do not treat them differently due to race or religion.' Participants primarily reported preferring health care workers to ask them about their beliefs when receiving care and all participants agreed that they would prefer a female health care worker.'' Most respondents reported that their husbands know the most about family healthcare needs and make the family health care decisions though consent for treatments and procedures is discussed and agreed upon between the spouses.' The strongest survey responses occurred regarding the importance of eating only halal foods when hospitalized. Conclusion: :' Overall, the majority of the participants reported feeling comfortable with many aspects of the American healthcare system.' In Focus Group A, one participant stated that in Lubbock people are very welcoming and no-one treats her badly. The other group participants smiled and agreed.' Another participant stated, 'Things are very good here'.' It is beneficial to recognize the responsive, transcultural care provided by many healthcare workers.' Despite these findings, it is also imperative to recognize that one respondent reported feelings of discomfort and judgmental treatment.' Respect and impartiality are key issues when assisting patients of different cultures, backgrounds and experiences.' Healthcare workers must be aware of patient perceptions to improve the health and well-being of Muslim women in global communities.en
dc.subjectTranscultural Careen
dc.subjectMuslim Immigrant Womenen
dc.subjectResearch Posteren
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:51:04Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:51:04Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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