Development of a Suicidal Recovery Instrument to Assess Suicidal Individuals' Recovery Condition

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601650
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Title:
Development of a Suicidal Recovery Instrument to Assess Suicidal Individuals' Recovery Condition
Author(s):
Sun, Fan-Ko; Chiang, Chun-Ying; Wang, Ruey-Hsia
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Lambda Beta-at-Large
Author Details:
Fan-Ko Sun, RN, sunfanko@isu.edu.tw; Chun-Ying Chiang, PhD, RN; Ruey-Hsia Wang, PhD, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 25, 2015: Purpose: The aim of this study was to establish the reliability and validity of a suicidal recovery instrument to assess suicidal individuals' recovery condition.Methods: Four professionals in this area, and 10 patients who recovered from suicide attempts screened the suicidal recovery instrument to establish content validity. A pilot study was conducted comprising patients who recovered from suicide attempts (n=84) to test the instrument for reliability. Internal consistency reliability and test-retest reliability (two tests over a one-month interval) were used to determine the reliability of the instrument. Results: The average age of the participants was 40.08' 10.68. The average period from suicide attempt was 19.9' 9.1 months. Most of the participants were females (n=62, 73.8%), lived with family/friend/relatives (n=74, 88.1%), and families were their support system (n=65, 77.4%). More than half of the participants belonged to the Buddhist or Taoist faith (n=52, 62.6%). Half of the participants had suffered an important loss within one year (n=42, 50%) and failing health was the ''principal reason (n=19, 22.6%). Half of the participants had only attempted suicide once (n=42, 50%). The top means of attempted suicide was overdosing on medication (n=60, 71.4%). The most common reason for attempting suicide was depression (n=42, 50%). Almost half of the participants held a high school degree (n=35, 41.7%) with either no job (n=36, 42.9%) or full time job (n=38, 45.3%).' One third of the participants were married (n=31, 36.9%) or divorced (including separated and bereaved of spouse) (n=28, 33.4%) with no children (n=29, 34.5%). The final version of the SRS contained four subcategories with 22 items: identifying the meaning of existence, adaptive ability, optimistic facing life, and attitude towards life. The result of content validity index (CVI) was 0.94 for the instrument. Cronbach's alpha demonstrated a reliability of 0.91 for the instrument. The test-retest reliability for the instrument was 0.60.Conclusion: The suicidal recovery instrument tested satisfactorily for content validity and reliability. In future research, the researcher can use Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to examine the construct validity.
Keywords:
suicidal recovery instrument; reliability; validity
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15PST272
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleDevelopment of a Suicidal Recovery Instrument to Assess Suicidal Individuals' Recovery Conditionen
dc.contributor.authorSun, Fan-Koen
dc.contributor.authorChiang, Chun-Yingen
dc.contributor.authorWang, Ruey-Hsiaen
dc.contributor.departmentLambda Beta-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsFan-Ko Sun, RN, sunfanko@isu.edu.tw; Chun-Ying Chiang, PhD, RN; Ruey-Hsia Wang, PhD, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601650-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 25, 2015: Purpose: The aim of this study was to establish the reliability and validity of a suicidal recovery instrument to assess suicidal individuals' recovery condition.Methods: Four professionals in this area, and 10 patients who recovered from suicide attempts screened the suicidal recovery instrument to establish content validity. A pilot study was conducted comprising patients who recovered from suicide attempts (n=84) to test the instrument for reliability. Internal consistency reliability and test-retest reliability (two tests over a one-month interval) were used to determine the reliability of the instrument. Results: The average age of the participants was 40.08' 10.68. The average period from suicide attempt was 19.9' 9.1 months. Most of the participants were females (n=62, 73.8%), lived with family/friend/relatives (n=74, 88.1%), and families were their support system (n=65, 77.4%). More than half of the participants belonged to the Buddhist or Taoist faith (n=52, 62.6%). Half of the participants had suffered an important loss within one year (n=42, 50%) and failing health was the ''principal reason (n=19, 22.6%). Half of the participants had only attempted suicide once (n=42, 50%). The top means of attempted suicide was overdosing on medication (n=60, 71.4%). The most common reason for attempting suicide was depression (n=42, 50%). Almost half of the participants held a high school degree (n=35, 41.7%) with either no job (n=36, 42.9%) or full time job (n=38, 45.3%).' One third of the participants were married (n=31, 36.9%) or divorced (including separated and bereaved of spouse) (n=28, 33.4%) with no children (n=29, 34.5%). The final version of the SRS contained four subcategories with 22 items: identifying the meaning of existence, adaptive ability, optimistic facing life, and attitude towards life. The result of content validity index (CVI) was 0.94 for the instrument. Cronbach's alpha demonstrated a reliability of 0.91 for the instrument. The test-retest reliability for the instrument was 0.60.Conclusion: The suicidal recovery instrument tested satisfactorily for content validity and reliability. In future research, the researcher can use Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to examine the construct validity.en
dc.subjectsuicidal recovery instrumenten
dc.subjectreliabilityen
dc.subjectvalidityen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:51:47Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:51:47Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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