Associations Between Maternal Depressive Symptoms and Diathesis Factors in Families with Young Children Having Developmental Delay or Disability

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601684
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Associations Between Maternal Depressive Symptoms and Diathesis Factors in Families with Young Children Having Developmental Delay or Disability
Other Titles:
Postpartum Depression: Screening through Recovery [Session]
Author(s):
Matsuda, Yui; Beeber, Linda S.; Chang, YunKyung; Schwartz, Todd A.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Gamma Omega
Author Details:
Yui Matsuda, RN, yuicornejo@gmail.com; Linda S. Beeber, PMHNCNS-BC, FAAN; YunKyung Chang, RN; Todd A. Schwartz
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, July 27, 2015: Purpose: ' Physical and mental well-being of mothers best supports healthy growth in children. Maternal depressive symptoms are negatively associated with children's physical growth, emotional growth, and even their school performance. Although a young child with a developmental delay (DD)/disability needs mother's close attention and day-to-day support, his/her mother tends to have higher depressive symptoms, which impedes her from providing the best support for her child. Having additional children with DD/disability may be associated with higher maternal depressive symptoms. The purpose of this study is to examine associations between maternal depressive symptoms and number of children with DD/ disability accounting for maternal diathesis factors (predisposing conditions that may lead to negative maternal/family outcome) and family stress factors. Methods: This study is a secondary analysis of the pooled baseline data from three intervention studies conducted by Beeber et al.; The 'Wings' Depressive Symptom Intervention for Latina Mothers, Reducing Depressive Symptoms in Low-Income Mothers, EHS Latina Mothers: Reducing Depressive Symptoms and Improving Infant/Toddler Mental Health (n=376). Maternal depressive symptoms were assessed with CES-D (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale) 20 items. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine associations between maternal depressive symptoms and number of children with DD/disability, categorized as zero vs. one vs. two or more; first, adjusting for family stress factors and then further adjusting for maternal diathesis factors. In addition, a post hoc Tukey-Kramer comparison of the least square means were examined among the number of children with DD/disability.' Results: In the model including family stress factors, we found a significant test for linear trend in the mean for maternal depressive symptoms across the number of children with DD/disability (F[1]=5.14, p=0.024). Lower family conflict (F[1]=18.28 p<0.001) and the presence of child's medical condition (F[1]=8.85, p=0.0031) were significant correlates of higher mean maternal depressive symptoms. Maternal depressive symptoms tend to be lowest among households in which there are no children with DD/disability (M=22.73), slightly increase for households with one child with DD/disabilities (M=23.46), and are highest in households with more than two children with DD/disabilities (M=28.61). In the model adjusting for both family stress factors and maternal diathesis factors, the trend in depressive symptoms across the number of children with DD/disabilities was attenuated. Maternal depressive symptoms tend to be higher for households with two or more children with DD/disabilities compared to households with zero to one child with DD/disabilities.''' Conclusion: Mothers who have multiple children with DD/disabilities require extra support for their mental health so that they can best attend to their children's developmental needs. Other potential intervention targets would be conflict management at the family level, reduction in maternal depressive symptoms as well as mothers' empowerment and self-support, and managing the children's medical needs.
Keywords:
Maternal depressive symptoms; Health disparities; Children with disability/developmental delay
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15L10
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleAssociations Between Maternal Depressive Symptoms and Diathesis Factors in Families with Young Children Having Developmental Delay or Disabilityen
dc.title.alternativePostpartum Depression: Screening through Recovery [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorMatsuda, Yuien
dc.contributor.authorBeeber, Linda S.en
dc.contributor.authorChang, YunKyungen
dc.contributor.authorSchwartz, Todd A.en
dc.contributor.departmentGamma Omegaen
dc.author.detailsYui Matsuda, RN, yuicornejo@gmail.com; Linda S. Beeber, PMHNCNS-BC, FAAN; YunKyung Chang, RN; Todd A. Schwartzen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601684-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, July 27, 2015: Purpose: ' Physical and mental well-being of mothers best supports healthy growth in children. Maternal depressive symptoms are negatively associated with children's physical growth, emotional growth, and even their school performance. Although a young child with a developmental delay (DD)/disability needs mother's close attention and day-to-day support, his/her mother tends to have higher depressive symptoms, which impedes her from providing the best support for her child. Having additional children with DD/disability may be associated with higher maternal depressive symptoms. The purpose of this study is to examine associations between maternal depressive symptoms and number of children with DD/ disability accounting for maternal diathesis factors (predisposing conditions that may lead to negative maternal/family outcome) and family stress factors. Methods: This study is a secondary analysis of the pooled baseline data from three intervention studies conducted by Beeber et al.; The 'Wings' Depressive Symptom Intervention for Latina Mothers, Reducing Depressive Symptoms in Low-Income Mothers, EHS Latina Mothers: Reducing Depressive Symptoms and Improving Infant/Toddler Mental Health (n=376). Maternal depressive symptoms were assessed with CES-D (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale) 20 items. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine associations between maternal depressive symptoms and number of children with DD/disability, categorized as zero vs. one vs. two or more; first, adjusting for family stress factors and then further adjusting for maternal diathesis factors. In addition, a post hoc Tukey-Kramer comparison of the least square means were examined among the number of children with DD/disability.' Results: In the model including family stress factors, we found a significant test for linear trend in the mean for maternal depressive symptoms across the number of children with DD/disability (F[1]=5.14, p=0.024). Lower family conflict (F[1]=18.28 p<0.001) and the presence of child's medical condition (F[1]=8.85, p=0.0031) were significant correlates of higher mean maternal depressive symptoms. Maternal depressive symptoms tend to be lowest among households in which there are no children with DD/disability (M=22.73), slightly increase for households with one child with DD/disabilities (M=23.46), and are highest in households with more than two children with DD/disabilities (M=28.61). In the model adjusting for both family stress factors and maternal diathesis factors, the trend in depressive symptoms across the number of children with DD/disabilities was attenuated. Maternal depressive symptoms tend to be higher for households with two or more children with DD/disabilities compared to households with zero to one child with DD/disabilities.''' Conclusion: Mothers who have multiple children with DD/disabilities require extra support for their mental health so that they can best attend to their children's developmental needs. Other potential intervention targets would be conflict management at the family level, reduction in maternal depressive symptoms as well as mothers' empowerment and self-support, and managing the children's medical needs.en
dc.subjectMaternal depressive symptomsen
dc.subjectHealth disparitiesen
dc.subjectChildren with disability/developmental delayen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:52:42Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:52:42Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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