2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601685
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Knowledge and Application of Human Rights Principles in Nursing Practice
Other Titles:
Building a Practice in Nursing and Health Care [Session]
Author(s):
Mayers, Pat M.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Tau Lambda-at-Large
Author Details:
Pat M. Mayers, RN, RM, R Psych Nurse, R community Nurse. Reg tutor, pat.mayers@uct.ac.za
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, July 27, 2015: Purpose: Health professionals constitute an essential element to ensuring fulfillment of the right to health, however, human rights education without context and application has limited potential to create an environment in which the patient's human rights can be respected, promoted and protected. Human rights education contributes to protecting the dignity of all human beings and to building societies where human rights are valued and respected (World Programme for Human Rights Education Training, 2012). In South Africa such training was identified in the Truth and Reconciliation Commission report as an essential component of health professional curricula. In a multicultural society with the legacy of apartheid still very evident, health professionals need an understanding of the linkages between human rights and health, be able identify the human rights violations in their health care settings and be equipped with the necessary knowledge, skills and attitudes which will enable them to take appropriate action. In response to the need for nurses to be competent and confident take a rights based approach to care, a module in health and human rights is a core component of the curriculum for the postgraduate Diploma in Nursing at the University of Cape Town. This module aims to equip postgraduate nursing students with the necessary skills, attitudes and knowledge to promote human rights and facilitate change in their clinical practice. This paper will report on an evaluation of the human rights training and nurses' response to this over a period of ten years since 2005. Methods: 'A survey using a self administered questionnaire, followed by interviews conducted with purposively sampled participants who consented to describe the challenges and barriers of putting human rights principles into practice, and have been instrumental in effecting positive changes. Ethical approval for the study was obtained from the institutional ethics committee. Participants'' rights were respected at all times. Results: (preliminary): A number of barriers and challenges were identified which include structural, practice and lack of support for change. Final results will be presented. Conclusion: Despite training nurses do need support to effect positive change in practice. Knowledge alone does not equip nurses to change practice unless there is sufficient buy-in from the institution. Recommendations for education and practice will be presented.
Keywords:
human rights; nursing education; health
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15M12
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleKnowledge and Application of Human Rights Principles in Nursing Practiceen
dc.title.alternativeBuilding a Practice in Nursing and Health Care [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorMayers, Pat M.en
dc.contributor.departmentTau Lambda-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsPat M. Mayers, RN, RM, R Psych Nurse, R community Nurse. Reg tutor, pat.mayers@uct.ac.zaen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601685-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, July 27, 2015: Purpose: Health professionals constitute an essential element to ensuring fulfillment of the right to health, however, human rights education without context and application has limited potential to create an environment in which the patient's human rights can be respected, promoted and protected. Human rights education contributes to protecting the dignity of all human beings and to building societies where human rights are valued and respected (World Programme for Human Rights Education Training, 2012). In South Africa such training was identified in the Truth and Reconciliation Commission report as an essential component of health professional curricula. In a multicultural society with the legacy of apartheid still very evident, health professionals need an understanding of the linkages between human rights and health, be able identify the human rights violations in their health care settings and be equipped with the necessary knowledge, skills and attitudes which will enable them to take appropriate action. In response to the need for nurses to be competent and confident take a rights based approach to care, a module in health and human rights is a core component of the curriculum for the postgraduate Diploma in Nursing at the University of Cape Town. This module aims to equip postgraduate nursing students with the necessary skills, attitudes and knowledge to promote human rights and facilitate change in their clinical practice. This paper will report on an evaluation of the human rights training and nurses' response to this over a period of ten years since 2005. Methods: 'A survey using a self administered questionnaire, followed by interviews conducted with purposively sampled participants who consented to describe the challenges and barriers of putting human rights principles into practice, and have been instrumental in effecting positive changes. Ethical approval for the study was obtained from the institutional ethics committee. Participants'' rights were respected at all times. Results: (preliminary): A number of barriers and challenges were identified which include structural, practice and lack of support for change. Final results will be presented. Conclusion: Despite training nurses do need support to effect positive change in practice. Knowledge alone does not equip nurses to change practice unless there is sufficient buy-in from the institution. Recommendations for education and practice will be presented.en
dc.subjecthuman rightsen
dc.subjectnursing educationen
dc.subjecthealthen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:52:44Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:52:44Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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