2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601707
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Maintaining Emergency Room Nurse Momentum to Screen for Substance Use
Other Titles:
Promoting Clinical Outcomes in the Emergency Department [Session]
Author(s):
Kane, Irene; Mitchell, Ann M.; Puskar, Kathryn; Hagle, Holly; Lindsay, Dawn; Aiello, Jim; Owens, Kimberly
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Eta
Author Details:
Irene Kane, RN, CNAA, HFI, irk1@pitt.edu; Ann M. Mitchell, RN, FAAN; Kathryn Puskar, FAAN; Holly Hagle; Dawn Lindsay; Jim Aiello; Kimberly Owens, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Sunday, July 26, 2015: Purpose: Substance use is a worldwide public-health priority. Annually, 2.5 million die from the harmful use of alcohol (World Health Organization (WHO) 2011 Global Status Report).' 'WHO also reports that at least 15.3 million persons have drug use disorders (WHO, 2014).' Risks associated with use of alcohol and other drugs can lead to accidents, violent behavior, and societal/developmental issues.' To address substance use risks, an interprofessional (academic-community-health provider) partnership trained Emergency Department Registered Nurses (EDRNs) to utilize an evidence-based practice (Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment: SBIRT) to screen patients for substance misuse for timely brief interventions enhancing motivation to reduce use or follow-up on assessment referral.' To maintain SBIRT momentum by busy EDRNs, Nurse Champions were appointed who, with the ED Nurse Manager, play a critical role in coordinating ongoing SBIRT educational updates and quality outcomes and maintain a consult liaison with EDRN interprofessional trainers. Methods: During the SBIRT training of EDRNs in four hospitals located in urban, rural, and low-income areas, nurse champions: 1) observed and participated in the evidence-based content, teaching/ practice skills, and discussion sessions; and, 2) consulted with EDRN interprofessional trainers for SBIRT maintenance via ED manual development, online programming, educational posters and consultative return visits. ' Results: Overall, staff RNs demonstrated high rates of effectively engaging patients in the SBIRT process, with 91% conducting effective screens, 73% engaging patients in a negotiated interview, and 70% collaborating with patients to determine next steps. The most frequently cited reasons for not engaging in SBIRT was lack of relevancy to the patient population at the screening stage (N=4), difficulty in connecting use to a patient's presenting health problem at the brief intervention stage (N=3), because they felt a referral was not necessary (N=2), and waiting to collaborate with a behavioral health/ mental health/ social work colleague at the brief interview (N=1) or referral stage (N=2). Personal discomfort was cited as a reason for not engaging in SBIRT by only two individuals. Conclusion: EDRN SBIRT education promotes patients' need for intervention to be identified earlier along the continuum of use, abuse, and dependence. However, support for a busy EDRN to maintain developing SBIRT skills is critical to practice maintenance. The Nurse Champion role reinforces learning through encouraging and fostering emergent evidence-based SBIRT practice.
Keywords:
Nurse Champion; SBIRT; Nurse Education
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15H10
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleMaintaining Emergency Room Nurse Momentum to Screen for Substance Useen
dc.title.alternativePromoting Clinical Outcomes in the Emergency Department [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorKane, Ireneen
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Ann M.en
dc.contributor.authorPuskar, Kathrynen
dc.contributor.authorHagle, Hollyen
dc.contributor.authorLindsay, Dawnen
dc.contributor.authorAiello, Jimen
dc.contributor.authorOwens, Kimberlyen
dc.contributor.departmentEtaen
dc.author.detailsIrene Kane, RN, CNAA, HFI, irk1@pitt.edu; Ann M. Mitchell, RN, FAAN; Kathryn Puskar, FAAN; Holly Hagle; Dawn Lindsay; Jim Aiello; Kimberly Owens, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601707-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Sunday, July 26, 2015: Purpose: Substance use is a worldwide public-health priority. Annually, 2.5 million die from the harmful use of alcohol (World Health Organization (WHO) 2011 Global Status Report).' 'WHO also reports that at least 15.3 million persons have drug use disorders (WHO, 2014).' Risks associated with use of alcohol and other drugs can lead to accidents, violent behavior, and societal/developmental issues.' To address substance use risks, an interprofessional (academic-community-health provider) partnership trained Emergency Department Registered Nurses (EDRNs) to utilize an evidence-based practice (Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment: SBIRT) to screen patients for substance misuse for timely brief interventions enhancing motivation to reduce use or follow-up on assessment referral.' To maintain SBIRT momentum by busy EDRNs, Nurse Champions were appointed who, with the ED Nurse Manager, play a critical role in coordinating ongoing SBIRT educational updates and quality outcomes and maintain a consult liaison with EDRN interprofessional trainers. Methods: During the SBIRT training of EDRNs in four hospitals located in urban, rural, and low-income areas, nurse champions: 1) observed and participated in the evidence-based content, teaching/ practice skills, and discussion sessions; and, 2) consulted with EDRN interprofessional trainers for SBIRT maintenance via ED manual development, online programming, educational posters and consultative return visits. ' Results: Overall, staff RNs demonstrated high rates of effectively engaging patients in the SBIRT process, with 91% conducting effective screens, 73% engaging patients in a negotiated interview, and 70% collaborating with patients to determine next steps. The most frequently cited reasons for not engaging in SBIRT was lack of relevancy to the patient population at the screening stage (N=4), difficulty in connecting use to a patient's presenting health problem at the brief intervention stage (N=3), because they felt a referral was not necessary (N=2), and waiting to collaborate with a behavioral health/ mental health/ social work colleague at the brief interview (N=1) or referral stage (N=2). Personal discomfort was cited as a reason for not engaging in SBIRT by only two individuals. Conclusion: EDRN SBIRT education promotes patients' need for intervention to be identified earlier along the continuum of use, abuse, and dependence. However, support for a busy EDRN to maintain developing SBIRT skills is critical to practice maintenance. The Nurse Champion role reinforces learning through encouraging and fostering emergent evidence-based SBIRT practice.en
dc.subjectNurse Championen
dc.subjectSBIRTen
dc.subjectNurse Educationen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:53:22Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:53:22Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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