Technologies to Influence Nursing Practice in Rural Areas Promoting Alcohol Screening

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601708
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Technologies to Influence Nursing Practice in Rural Areas Promoting Alcohol Screening
Other Titles:
Technology that Influences Nursing Practice [Session]
Author(s):
Lee, Heeyoung; Puskar, Kathryn; Mitchell, Ann M.; Kane, Irene; Hagle, Holly; Lindsay, Dawn; Albrecht, Susan A.; Fioravanti, Marie; Frank, Linda Rose
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Eta
Author Details:
Heeyoung Lee, APRN- BC, leehee@pitt.edu; Kathryn Puskar, FAAN; Ann M. Mitchell, RN, FAAN; Irene Kane, RN, CNAA, HFI; Holly Hagle; Dawn Lindsay; Susan A. Albrecht, RN, FAAN; Marie Fioravanti, RN; Linda Rose Frank, RN, ACRN, CS, FAAN
Abstract:
Session presented on Sunday, July 26, 2015: Purpose: Over 23 million individuals in the U.S. are identified as need treatment for alcohol and/or other drug problems, however only 1 in 5 receive treatment. Further, lack of specialist and lack of access to services in rural areas makes Interprofessional Collaborative Practice (IPCP) imperative for the most effective patient care. Social attitudes and stigma associated with the use of alcohol, tobacco and illicit drugs make substance abuse one of the most complex public health issues (Healthy People 2020).' Health professionals must be skilled to identify, assess, and intervene to reduce the risks/effects of substance use.' Implementing new models of interprofessional practice requires innovation, relationship building, networking, and patience.' The purpose of this presentation is to present an interprofessional practice model to educate rural healthcare teams and apply interprofessional practice to substance use/misuse screening through the use of online technology. This presentation describes an online technology to deliver health care in rural areas.' Rural areas of the U.S. northeast report a higher prevalence of alcohol use compared to urban centers of the region (Eberhardt et al., 2001). Further, the consequences of drug use in rural communities may be greater in rural areas because of limited access to substance use treatment (Dempsey, Bird, & Hartley, 1999). Healthcare teams in rural counties learned and used the universal prevention alcohol and drug use model of Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) to promote clinical outcomes. Methods: The intervention includes eight online hours of 1) modules on substance use, 2) interactive case studies designed to include IPCP content, and 3) interprofessional dialogues with site cases. Free continuing education units are provided. Survey data are collected at five time points. Questionnaires included the Alcohol and Alcohol Problems Perception Questionnaire (AAPPQ), Drug and Drug Problems Perception Questionnaire (DDPPQ), and the Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale (IEPS). Results: Participants were primarily white females from rural regions of Pennsylvania. The majority of participants worked in hospitals (30%), addiction treatment facilities (12%), and community health centers (10%). One third of the participants were nurses, and the remaining participants identified as mental health workers, public health workers, and students. For the AAPPQ, significant increases were noted for Role Adequacy and Role Legitimacy subscales (p<0.05). For the DDPPQ, significant increases were noted for Role Adequacy. On the IEPS, no significant increases were noted after training; however, the Autonomy and Actual Cooperation scales increased significantly after the interprofessional dialogue (p<0.05). Conclusion: Substance use is a worldwide public-health priority. Annually, 2.5 million people die from the harmful use of alcohol with resulting accidents, violent behavior, and other societal costs. By engaging with the model, practitioners are better able to provide team-based care for substance use.' The IP Dialogues were associated with increased positive attitudes toward interprofessional principles. Linking health professionals in online technology to enhance positive health outcomes is imperative and facilitates connections between fragmented healthcare sectors.'Through technology, nurses better understand their role in substance use and risk reduction.
Keywords:
Interprofessional; Technology; Substance Use
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15K13
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleTechnologies to Influence Nursing Practice in Rural Areas Promoting Alcohol Screeningen
dc.title.alternativeTechnology that Influences Nursing Practice [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorLee, Heeyoungen
dc.contributor.authorPuskar, Kathrynen
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Ann M.en
dc.contributor.authorKane, Ireneen
dc.contributor.authorHagle, Hollyen
dc.contributor.authorLindsay, Dawnen
dc.contributor.authorAlbrecht, Susan A.en
dc.contributor.authorFioravanti, Marieen
dc.contributor.authorFrank, Linda Roseen
dc.contributor.departmentEtaen
dc.author.detailsHeeyoung Lee, APRN- BC, leehee@pitt.edu; Kathryn Puskar, FAAN; Ann M. Mitchell, RN, FAAN; Irene Kane, RN, CNAA, HFI; Holly Hagle; Dawn Lindsay; Susan A. Albrecht, RN, FAAN; Marie Fioravanti, RN; Linda Rose Frank, RN, ACRN, CS, FAANen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601708-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Sunday, July 26, 2015: Purpose: Over 23 million individuals in the U.S. are identified as need treatment for alcohol and/or other drug problems, however only 1 in 5 receive treatment. Further, lack of specialist and lack of access to services in rural areas makes Interprofessional Collaborative Practice (IPCP) imperative for the most effective patient care. Social attitudes and stigma associated with the use of alcohol, tobacco and illicit drugs make substance abuse one of the most complex public health issues (Healthy People 2020).' Health professionals must be skilled to identify, assess, and intervene to reduce the risks/effects of substance use.' Implementing new models of interprofessional practice requires innovation, relationship building, networking, and patience.' The purpose of this presentation is to present an interprofessional practice model to educate rural healthcare teams and apply interprofessional practice to substance use/misuse screening through the use of online technology. This presentation describes an online technology to deliver health care in rural areas.' Rural areas of the U.S. northeast report a higher prevalence of alcohol use compared to urban centers of the region (Eberhardt et al., 2001). Further, the consequences of drug use in rural communities may be greater in rural areas because of limited access to substance use treatment (Dempsey, Bird, & Hartley, 1999). Healthcare teams in rural counties learned and used the universal prevention alcohol and drug use model of Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) to promote clinical outcomes. Methods: The intervention includes eight online hours of 1) modules on substance use, 2) interactive case studies designed to include IPCP content, and 3) interprofessional dialogues with site cases. Free continuing education units are provided. Survey data are collected at five time points. Questionnaires included the Alcohol and Alcohol Problems Perception Questionnaire (AAPPQ), Drug and Drug Problems Perception Questionnaire (DDPPQ), and the Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale (IEPS). Results: Participants were primarily white females from rural regions of Pennsylvania. The majority of participants worked in hospitals (30%), addiction treatment facilities (12%), and community health centers (10%). One third of the participants were nurses, and the remaining participants identified as mental health workers, public health workers, and students. For the AAPPQ, significant increases were noted for Role Adequacy and Role Legitimacy subscales (p<0.05). For the DDPPQ, significant increases were noted for Role Adequacy. On the IEPS, no significant increases were noted after training; however, the Autonomy and Actual Cooperation scales increased significantly after the interprofessional dialogue (p<0.05). Conclusion: Substance use is a worldwide public-health priority. Annually, 2.5 million people die from the harmful use of alcohol with resulting accidents, violent behavior, and other societal costs. By engaging with the model, practitioners are better able to provide team-based care for substance use.' The IP Dialogues were associated with increased positive attitudes toward interprofessional principles. Linking health professionals in online technology to enhance positive health outcomes is imperative and facilitates connections between fragmented healthcare sectors.'Through technology, nurses better understand their role in substance use and risk reduction.en
dc.subjectInterprofessionalen
dc.subjectTechnologyen
dc.subjectSubstance Useen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:53:23Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:53:23Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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