Influence of Sociocultural Factors on the Attitudes toward Intimate Partner Violence among College Students in Costa Rica

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601735
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Influence of Sociocultural Factors on the Attitudes toward Intimate Partner Violence among College Students in Costa Rica
Other Titles:
Promoting Health among Victims of Intimate Partner Violence [Session]
Author(s):
Munoz-Rojas, Derby
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Beta Tau
Author Details:
Derby Munoz-Rojas, RN, d.munozrojas@umiami.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, July 27, 2015: Purpose: Although intimate partner violence (IPV) is a worldwide public health issue affecting millions of people, adolescents and young adults are disproportionally affected. IPV is a complex problem primarily because it is influenced by a web of risks and protective factors, which interact and shape the experiences of each person. However, the exact nature of these interactions is not well understood, particularly among emerging adults and in cultures where gender norms are rapidly changing and less IPV research has been conducted, such as in Costa Rica. Specifically, little is known about the effect of sociocultural factors on the experiences of IPV among this population. The purpose of this correlational descriptive study was to assess the role of parents' background, area of origin, religious commitment, and gender and partnership stereotypes on the attitudes toward IPV among college students in Costa Rica.' Methods: A convenience sample of undergraduate college students recruited from a Costa Rican public university completed an electronic self-report survey (N=249). Students reported their attitudes toward IPV, gender norms, partnership stereotypes, level of religious commitment, and parents' background. Data was analyzed using structural equation modeling. Analysis was controlled by gender, sexual identity, religious attendance, marital status, and parents' marital status.' Results: Although all the proposed variables were not significantly associated with attitudes toward IPV except partnership stereotypes (p=.001), IPV attitudes were significantly associated with gender (p=.001), marital status (p=<.001), and religious attendance (p=.026). The indirect effect of partnership stereotypes through religious attendance on the attitudes toward IPV was also significant (p=.03). In addition, path analysis results indicated that religious attendance was significantly linked to partnership stereotypes (p=.005) and religious commitment (p<.001), while parents' background was significantly related to religious commitment (p=.007).' Conclusion: Findings elucidate how college students' attitudes toward IPV in Costa Rica are shaped through the interaction of multilevel sociocultural factors. Implications of the study and recommendations for nursing, research, practice, and policy are discussed.
Keywords:
attitudes toward intimate partner violence; college students; sociocultural factors
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15M13
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleInfluence of Sociocultural Factors on the Attitudes toward Intimate Partner Violence among College Students in Costa Ricaen
dc.title.alternativePromoting Health among Victims of Intimate Partner Violence [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorMunoz-Rojas, Derbyen
dc.contributor.departmentBeta Tauen
dc.author.detailsDerby Munoz-Rojas, RN, d.munozrojas@umiami.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601735-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, July 27, 2015: Purpose: Although intimate partner violence (IPV) is a worldwide public health issue affecting millions of people, adolescents and young adults are disproportionally affected. IPV is a complex problem primarily because it is influenced by a web of risks and protective factors, which interact and shape the experiences of each person. However, the exact nature of these interactions is not well understood, particularly among emerging adults and in cultures where gender norms are rapidly changing and less IPV research has been conducted, such as in Costa Rica. Specifically, little is known about the effect of sociocultural factors on the experiences of IPV among this population. The purpose of this correlational descriptive study was to assess the role of parents' background, area of origin, religious commitment, and gender and partnership stereotypes on the attitudes toward IPV among college students in Costa Rica.' Methods: A convenience sample of undergraduate college students recruited from a Costa Rican public university completed an electronic self-report survey (N=249). Students reported their attitudes toward IPV, gender norms, partnership stereotypes, level of religious commitment, and parents' background. Data was analyzed using structural equation modeling. Analysis was controlled by gender, sexual identity, religious attendance, marital status, and parents' marital status.' Results: Although all the proposed variables were not significantly associated with attitudes toward IPV except partnership stereotypes (p=.001), IPV attitudes were significantly associated with gender (p=.001), marital status (p=<.001), and religious attendance (p=.026). The indirect effect of partnership stereotypes through religious attendance on the attitudes toward IPV was also significant (p=.03). In addition, path analysis results indicated that religious attendance was significantly linked to partnership stereotypes (p=.005) and religious commitment (p<.001), while parents' background was significantly related to religious commitment (p=.007).' Conclusion: Findings elucidate how college students' attitudes toward IPV in Costa Rica are shaped through the interaction of multilevel sociocultural factors. Implications of the study and recommendations for nursing, research, practice, and policy are discussed.en
dc.subjectattitudes toward intimate partner violenceen
dc.subjectcollege studentsen
dc.subjectsociocultural factorsen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:54:09Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:54:09Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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