Bedside Shift Report: A Patient-Centered Approach to Improving Satisfaction Scores

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601740
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Bedside Shift Report: A Patient-Centered Approach to Improving Satisfaction Scores
Other Titles:
Facilitating Communication in the Health Care Setting [Session]
Author(s):
Reinbeck, Donna
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Theta Sigma
Author Details:
Donna Reinbeck, RN, OCN, NEA-BC, dreinbeck@gmail.com
Abstract:
Session presented on Sunday, July 26, 2015: Background: In 2001 the Institute of Medicine report, Crossing the Quality Chasm, included patient centeredness as one of its six overarching aims for improving the health care system.' Patient centered care can be defined as, 'improving health care through the eyes of the patient', often measured by patient experience surveys such as the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS).' Improving the patient experience involves changing the current culture of the way nurses practice and communicate with each other and with their patients.' One way to improve these communications is to commit to bedside shift report.' Historically nursing shift to shift reports have occurred at a central nursing station on a patient care unit. Patient history, plan of care and information vital to the care of the patient are exchanged during this time. This traditional practice of one way communication from the off-going provider to the oncoming nurse can be lengthy, incomplete and fraught with interruptions. This hand off occurs with no patient involvement which can lead to errors, confusion about treatments, diagnosis and medications.' Moving report to the bedside improves transparency between the healthcare team and the patient. The patients are able to hear exactly what their plan of care entails and are free to add any pertinent information.' Achieving this level of communication does not come without establishing trust between the nursing staff and the patients.' Nurses must demonstrate empathy, respect and compassion in order to establish this type of relationship. Objective: To measure the effects of implementing a standardized bedside shift report on patient experience. Methods: 'Beginning September 2011, all unit nurses attended an educational session to learn about bedside shift report. Each member received a handout containing evidence based information about bedside shift reporting.' A standardized tool based on the Situation, Background, Assessment, and Recommendation (SBAR) communication structure was developed to encompass all items expected to be reviewed at change of shift.' The proper way to conduct a bedside handoff with this new tool was reviewed with all staff. Questions and concerns were addresses prior to implementing the new reporting system. Over the last two weeks of November 2011, the Director of Patient Care shadowed staff to observe reporting process, identify any areas for improvement and support staff through the change. Weekly meeting were held to discuss issues and concerns relating to patient confidentiality, physician buy-in, and focusing the handoff around the patient. Bedside shift report became a mandatory requirement on December 1, 2011. Results: Immediate and dramatic results were seen related to HCAHPS nursing communication scores in all four domains. The greatest improvement was seen in the nurses explain things in a way you understand which improved from 64 to 71 or 11%.' One important indicator of the effectiveness of bedside reporting is the nurses treat with courtesy and respect scores which increased 10% from 83 to 91.' These indicators validate that nursing staff is building relationships with patients and effectively engaging patients in their care.' Some barriers were encountered during the implementation of bedside report specifically relating to patient confidentiality and physician buy-in.' Staff had concerns about sharing clinical information at the patients' bedside and violating HIPAA.' Further education was provided to staff members on what pertinent information to share and how the sharing of information is considered incidental disclosure under the HIPAA law. One physician wanted to 'opt out' of bedside shift report for their patients. 'The Director of Patient Care provided further education to the physician on bedside shift report and the positive impact it would have on safety and communication, afterwards they were agreeable to the process change. Conclusion: ' The implementation of bedside shift report has significantly improved the patient experience on the unit.' Patients and their families have reported feeling more involved in their plan of care and have felt they received more information on their condition.' Staff satisfaction and perceptions of hand-off communication has also improved with the standardization of the hand-off tool.' Concise information on the patients' condition is reported to assist the oncoming nurse appropriately plan the patients care for their shift.' Sustaining bedside report will remain the focus for the staff of the department while the unit transitions from semi-private to private patient care rooms.
Keywords:
Communication; Safety
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15H07
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleBedside Shift Report: A Patient-Centered Approach to Improving Satisfaction Scoresen
dc.title.alternativeFacilitating Communication in the Health Care Setting [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorReinbeck, Donnaen
dc.contributor.departmentTheta Sigmaen
dc.author.detailsDonna Reinbeck, RN, OCN, NEA-BC, dreinbeck@gmail.comen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601740-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Sunday, July 26, 2015: Background: In 2001 the Institute of Medicine report, Crossing the Quality Chasm, included patient centeredness as one of its six overarching aims for improving the health care system.' Patient centered care can be defined as, 'improving health care through the eyes of the patient', often measured by patient experience surveys such as the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS).' Improving the patient experience involves changing the current culture of the way nurses practice and communicate with each other and with their patients.' One way to improve these communications is to commit to bedside shift report.' Historically nursing shift to shift reports have occurred at a central nursing station on a patient care unit. Patient history, plan of care and information vital to the care of the patient are exchanged during this time. This traditional practice of one way communication from the off-going provider to the oncoming nurse can be lengthy, incomplete and fraught with interruptions. This hand off occurs with no patient involvement which can lead to errors, confusion about treatments, diagnosis and medications.' Moving report to the bedside improves transparency between the healthcare team and the patient. The patients are able to hear exactly what their plan of care entails and are free to add any pertinent information.' Achieving this level of communication does not come without establishing trust between the nursing staff and the patients.' Nurses must demonstrate empathy, respect and compassion in order to establish this type of relationship. Objective: To measure the effects of implementing a standardized bedside shift report on patient experience. Methods: 'Beginning September 2011, all unit nurses attended an educational session to learn about bedside shift report. Each member received a handout containing evidence based information about bedside shift reporting.' A standardized tool based on the Situation, Background, Assessment, and Recommendation (SBAR) communication structure was developed to encompass all items expected to be reviewed at change of shift.' The proper way to conduct a bedside handoff with this new tool was reviewed with all staff. Questions and concerns were addresses prior to implementing the new reporting system. Over the last two weeks of November 2011, the Director of Patient Care shadowed staff to observe reporting process, identify any areas for improvement and support staff through the change. Weekly meeting were held to discuss issues and concerns relating to patient confidentiality, physician buy-in, and focusing the handoff around the patient. Bedside shift report became a mandatory requirement on December 1, 2011. Results: Immediate and dramatic results were seen related to HCAHPS nursing communication scores in all four domains. The greatest improvement was seen in the nurses explain things in a way you understand which improved from 64 to 71 or 11%.' One important indicator of the effectiveness of bedside reporting is the nurses treat with courtesy and respect scores which increased 10% from 83 to 91.' These indicators validate that nursing staff is building relationships with patients and effectively engaging patients in their care.' Some barriers were encountered during the implementation of bedside report specifically relating to patient confidentiality and physician buy-in.' Staff had concerns about sharing clinical information at the patients' bedside and violating HIPAA.' Further education was provided to staff members on what pertinent information to share and how the sharing of information is considered incidental disclosure under the HIPAA law. One physician wanted to 'opt out' of bedside shift report for their patients. 'The Director of Patient Care provided further education to the physician on bedside shift report and the positive impact it would have on safety and communication, afterwards they were agreeable to the process change. Conclusion: ' The implementation of bedside shift report has significantly improved the patient experience on the unit.' Patients and their families have reported feeling more involved in their plan of care and have felt they received more information on their condition.' Staff satisfaction and perceptions of hand-off communication has also improved with the standardization of the hand-off tool.' Concise information on the patients' condition is reported to assist the oncoming nurse appropriately plan the patients care for their shift.' Sustaining bedside report will remain the focus for the staff of the department while the unit transitions from semi-private to private patient care rooms.en
dc.subjectCommunicationen
dc.subjectSafetyen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:54:17Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:54:17Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.