The Clinical Education Learning Environment: Student Nurse Perceptions Comparing the Traditional Clinical Environment and the Simulation Environment Toward Meeting Clinical Learning Outcomes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601744
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Clinical Education Learning Environment: Student Nurse Perceptions Comparing the Traditional Clinical Environment and the Simulation Environment Toward Meeting Clinical Learning Outcomes
Other Titles:
Using Simulation in the Classroom [Session]
Author(s):
Breymier, Tonya L.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha
Author Details:
Tonya L. Breymier, RN, CNE, COI, tbreymie@iue.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, July 27, 2015: Purpose: The purpose of this presentation is for the attendee to differentiate which clinical learning outcomes are better met in the traditional and simulated clinical learning environments based on student nurse perceptions.' Methods: A qualitative approach that investigated the lived experiences of student nurses participating in simulated and traditional clinical environments. Three different focus group interviews were held with 15 undergraduate junior and senior nursing students from one Midwestern school of nursing. Data were analyzed by In Vivo coding and verified by individual phone interviews and transcript validation. Category to theme progression relative to each clinical learning environment emerged. Results: Students perceived strengths and weaknesses within both learning environments. Each clinical learning environment was perceived to be beneficial toward learning. Additional findings, such as lack of learning or obstacles to learning, were also identified in both clinical environments. Conclusion: : How students perceived the benefits of each clinical environment to meet clinical learning outcomes could provide direction for nurse educators to utilize specific learning environments to meet specific clinical learning outcomes.' Future research is needed to investigate the utility of selecting a particular clinical learning environment to meet specific clinical learning outcomes.'' Abstract:' Knowledge gaps exist regarding the use of simulation within nursing education and how simulation compares to the traditional clinical environment in meeting the learning outcomes of student nurses.' Linking theory to practice in a safe environment has become a challenge for nursing education. With decreased length of stays, decreased access to clinical sites, and faculty shortages, it has become a challenge for the discipline to provide a 'hands on' experience for nursing students. This presentation will share the results of a descriptive, focus group inquiry investigating how student nurses perceived their clinical learning needs were met in the traditional clinical learning environment and the simulated clinical learning environment. The clinical learning needs were defined as the BSN program learning outcomes. This presentation will share results from one Midwestern school of nursing that integrates both clinical learning environments throughout their curriculum. The research elicited four categories with themes in each category that supported or refuted clinical learning needs were met in each clinical learning environment: Linking past and present learning; significant moments; preventative learning; and, lack of opportunity for learning. While support for the simulated clinical learning environment in meeting clinical learning outcomes was identified, the student nurses perceived each clinical learning environment was better suited for meeting particular clinical learning outcomes. Both environments facilitated meeting critical thinking; knowledgeable care coordinator, communication, and competent provider of care. Both learning environments were also noted to inhibit cultural competence, professional role modeling, political awareness, and responsible manager of care. 'Attendees will leave with a sense of which clinical learning outcomes are best met in the traditional clinical learning environment and simulated clinical learning environment based on student perceptions, which will equip the educator by providing a new design for rebuilding their clinical experiences!
Keywords:
Clinical learning; Traditional and Simulated clinical learning environment; Clinical Learning Outcomes
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15L06
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleThe Clinical Education Learning Environment: Student Nurse Perceptions Comparing the Traditional Clinical Environment and the Simulation Environment Toward Meeting Clinical Learning Outcomesen
dc.title.alternativeUsing Simulation in the Classroom [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorBreymier, Tonya L.en
dc.contributor.departmentAlphaen
dc.author.detailsTonya L. Breymier, RN, CNE, COI, tbreymie@iue.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601744-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, July 27, 2015: Purpose: The purpose of this presentation is for the attendee to differentiate which clinical learning outcomes are better met in the traditional and simulated clinical learning environments based on student nurse perceptions.' Methods: A qualitative approach that investigated the lived experiences of student nurses participating in simulated and traditional clinical environments. Three different focus group interviews were held with 15 undergraduate junior and senior nursing students from one Midwestern school of nursing. Data were analyzed by In Vivo coding and verified by individual phone interviews and transcript validation. Category to theme progression relative to each clinical learning environment emerged. Results: Students perceived strengths and weaknesses within both learning environments. Each clinical learning environment was perceived to be beneficial toward learning. Additional findings, such as lack of learning or obstacles to learning, were also identified in both clinical environments. Conclusion: : How students perceived the benefits of each clinical environment to meet clinical learning outcomes could provide direction for nurse educators to utilize specific learning environments to meet specific clinical learning outcomes.' Future research is needed to investigate the utility of selecting a particular clinical learning environment to meet specific clinical learning outcomes.'' Abstract:' Knowledge gaps exist regarding the use of simulation within nursing education and how simulation compares to the traditional clinical environment in meeting the learning outcomes of student nurses.' Linking theory to practice in a safe environment has become a challenge for nursing education. With decreased length of stays, decreased access to clinical sites, and faculty shortages, it has become a challenge for the discipline to provide a 'hands on' experience for nursing students. This presentation will share the results of a descriptive, focus group inquiry investigating how student nurses perceived their clinical learning needs were met in the traditional clinical learning environment and the simulated clinical learning environment. The clinical learning needs were defined as the BSN program learning outcomes. This presentation will share results from one Midwestern school of nursing that integrates both clinical learning environments throughout their curriculum. The research elicited four categories with themes in each category that supported or refuted clinical learning needs were met in each clinical learning environment: Linking past and present learning; significant moments; preventative learning; and, lack of opportunity for learning. While support for the simulated clinical learning environment in meeting clinical learning outcomes was identified, the student nurses perceived each clinical learning environment was better suited for meeting particular clinical learning outcomes. Both environments facilitated meeting critical thinking; knowledgeable care coordinator, communication, and competent provider of care. Both learning environments were also noted to inhibit cultural competence, professional role modeling, political awareness, and responsible manager of care. 'Attendees will leave with a sense of which clinical learning outcomes are best met in the traditional clinical learning environment and simulated clinical learning environment based on student perceptions, which will equip the educator by providing a new design for rebuilding their clinical experiences!en
dc.subjectClinical learningen
dc.subjectTraditional and Simulated clinical learning environmenten
dc.subjectClinical Learning Outcomesen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:54:24Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:54:24Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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