Academic Performance: The Role of Cognitive Engagement among Student Nurses in a Jamaican Community College

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601750
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Academic Performance: The Role of Cognitive Engagement among Student Nurses in a Jamaican Community College
Other Titles:
Academic Performance: Variations Around the Globe [Session]
Author(s):
Taylor-Smith, Cassia Yolanda; Stephenson-Wilson, Kayon G.; Munroe, Dawn; Walker, Melissa; Anderson-Johnson, Pauline
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Cassia Yolanda Taylor-Smith, RM, RN, cytsmith@flowja.com; Kayon G. Stephenson-Wilson, RM, RN; Dawn Munroe, RN, RM; Melissa Walker, RN; Pauline Anderson-Johnson, RGN
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 25, 2015: Purpose: Evidence indicates that a positive relationship exists between cognitive engagement and academic performance. The transition of nursing education from hospital based training to universities and colleges in the Caribbean; require that nursing students engage at a higher cognitive level to secure academic success. Examination of the literature reveals gaps in understanding how cognitive engagement impact on the academic performance of nursing students internationally and nationally. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine if nursing students were cognitively engaged in the teaching-learning process, and the relationship that existed between their cognitive engagement and academic performance at a Rural Community College in Jamaica. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive correlational design was employed. All students (BSN and Assistant Nursing (AN)) enrolled at a rural community college in Jamaica were included (n = 117). To collect demographic and cognitive engagement data, items from the NSSE 2013 The College Student Report and The Engagement in Academic Work tool were combined to form a 33-item Cognitive Engagement Survey. Respondents' grade point averages (GPA) were obtained from anonymized records. The relationships between cognitive engagement and GPA were examined using Spearman's rho, Tukey post-hoc test and ANOVA, assisted by SPSS' version 20. Results: 'The response rate was 88% (n=103); 69 from the BSN years one to three and 34 from the AN group. Most respondents were 22 years and older (67%). Mean GPA was 2.49 ' 0.518; 59.2% of respondents achieved GPAs between 2.00 and 2.99, 23.3% had GPA ? 3.00, while 17.5% failed (GPA ? 1.00). 'The majority BSN and Assistant Nursing students (80% & 62% respectively) reported surface cognitive processing. A statistically significant relationship existed between deep cognitive engagement and academic performance (F [ 2, 100 ] = 3.35, p = .039). Conclusion: Most students utilized surface levels of cognitive engagement regardless of programme type with little effect on pass rates; however, deep cognitive engagement influenced the quality of academic performance. The need for critical clinical reasoning in patient care requires that teaching methodologies be examined with a view to stimulating the use of deep cognitive engagement among nursing students.
Keywords:
cognitive engagement; deep cognitive engagement; surface cognitive engagement
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15G15
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleAcademic Performance: The Role of Cognitive Engagement among Student Nurses in a Jamaican Community Collegeen
dc.title.alternativeAcademic Performance: Variations Around the Globe [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorTaylor-Smith, Cassia Yolandaen
dc.contributor.authorStephenson-Wilson, Kayon G.en
dc.contributor.authorMunroe, Dawnen
dc.contributor.authorWalker, Melissaen
dc.contributor.authorAnderson-Johnson, Paulineen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsCassia Yolanda Taylor-Smith, RM, RN, cytsmith@flowja.com; Kayon G. Stephenson-Wilson, RM, RN; Dawn Munroe, RN, RM; Melissa Walker, RN; Pauline Anderson-Johnson, RGNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601750-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 25, 2015: Purpose: Evidence indicates that a positive relationship exists between cognitive engagement and academic performance. The transition of nursing education from hospital based training to universities and colleges in the Caribbean; require that nursing students engage at a higher cognitive level to secure academic success. Examination of the literature reveals gaps in understanding how cognitive engagement impact on the academic performance of nursing students internationally and nationally. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine if nursing students were cognitively engaged in the teaching-learning process, and the relationship that existed between their cognitive engagement and academic performance at a Rural Community College in Jamaica. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive correlational design was employed. All students (BSN and Assistant Nursing (AN)) enrolled at a rural community college in Jamaica were included (n = 117). To collect demographic and cognitive engagement data, items from the NSSE 2013 The College Student Report and The Engagement in Academic Work tool were combined to form a 33-item Cognitive Engagement Survey. Respondents' grade point averages (GPA) were obtained from anonymized records. The relationships between cognitive engagement and GPA were examined using Spearman's rho, Tukey post-hoc test and ANOVA, assisted by SPSS' version 20. Results: 'The response rate was 88% (n=103); 69 from the BSN years one to three and 34 from the AN group. Most respondents were 22 years and older (67%). Mean GPA was 2.49 ' 0.518; 59.2% of respondents achieved GPAs between 2.00 and 2.99, 23.3% had GPA ? 3.00, while 17.5% failed (GPA ? 1.00). 'The majority BSN and Assistant Nursing students (80% & 62% respectively) reported surface cognitive processing. A statistically significant relationship existed between deep cognitive engagement and academic performance (F [ 2, 100 ] = 3.35, p = .039). Conclusion: Most students utilized surface levels of cognitive engagement regardless of programme type with little effect on pass rates; however, deep cognitive engagement influenced the quality of academic performance. The need for critical clinical reasoning in patient care requires that teaching methodologies be examined with a view to stimulating the use of deep cognitive engagement among nursing students.en
dc.subjectcognitive engagementen
dc.subjectdeep cognitive engagementen
dc.subjectsurface cognitive engagementen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:54:34Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:54:34Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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