Illness Representations and Self-Management Behaviors of African-American Adolescents with Asthma

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601761
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Illness Representations and Self-Management Behaviors of African-American Adolescents with Asthma
Other Titles:
Promoting Health and Cultural Diversity in the Adolescent [Session]
Author(s):
Crowder, Sharron J.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha
Author Details:
Sharron J. Crowder, RN, sjcrowde@iu.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Friday, July 24, 2015: Purpose: Many African American adolescents have inadequate self-management behaviors, particularly during middle adolescence (14'16 years of age). Inaccurate beliefs, degree of asthma impairment (well controlled or not well controlled), and gender could influence asthma self-management (symptom management, medication management, and environmental control). The concept of illness representations concept from the common sense self-regulation model provided the framework for this study. This descriptive correlational study explored (1) differences in illness representations (cognitive and emotional) and self-management behaviors by gender, asthma impairment, and gender by asthma impairment of African American adolescents with asthma; and (2) relationships between illness representations and asthma self-management behaviors, gender, and asthma impairment in 133 African American adolescents with asthma. Methods: Data were collected using the Asthma Control Test, the Illness Perceptions Questionnaire-Revised, and the Asthma Self-Care Practice Instrument. Data were analyzed using ANOVA, MANOVA, Pearson correlations, and multiple regressions. Results: Findings indicated that females whose asthma was not well controlled had more beliefs about the chronicity of their asthma than those who were well controlled. However, there were no differences in such beliefs among males whose asthma was not well controlled from those who were well controlled. Well controlled adolescents differed from not well controlled adolescents for cognitive representations of cyclic timeline, treatment control, psychological attributes, and consequences as well as for emotional representations. There were no significant differences in the means of the self-management behaviors by gender, by asthma impairment, or by gender by asthma impairment. A significant bivariate relationship was found between representations of identity, consequences, treatment control, and symptom management. In the multiple regression model, representations of treatment control and consequences contributed to variances in symptom management; however, no other representations, gender, or asthma impairment variables were statistically significant. The representations, gender, and asthma impairment variables did not contribute to variances in medication management or environmental control. Conclusion: Limited studies have been conducted with African American adolescents with asthma; therefore, the findings of this study add to the current knowledge of illness representations, gender, and asthma impairment and their relationship with self-management behaviors, particularly symptom management. The findings of this study also contribute to the literature on 'how African American adolescents' self-management behaviors can be improved.
Keywords:
asthma; Afican American; self-management
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15C10
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleIllness Representations and Self-Management Behaviors of African-American Adolescents with Asthmaen
dc.title.alternativePromoting Health and Cultural Diversity in the Adolescent [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorCrowder, Sharron J.en
dc.contributor.departmentAlphaen
dc.author.detailsSharron J. Crowder, RN, sjcrowde@iu.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601761-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Friday, July 24, 2015: Purpose: Many African American adolescents have inadequate self-management behaviors, particularly during middle adolescence (14'16 years of age). Inaccurate beliefs, degree of asthma impairment (well controlled or not well controlled), and gender could influence asthma self-management (symptom management, medication management, and environmental control). The concept of illness representations concept from the common sense self-regulation model provided the framework for this study. This descriptive correlational study explored (1) differences in illness representations (cognitive and emotional) and self-management behaviors by gender, asthma impairment, and gender by asthma impairment of African American adolescents with asthma; and (2) relationships between illness representations and asthma self-management behaviors, gender, and asthma impairment in 133 African American adolescents with asthma. Methods: Data were collected using the Asthma Control Test, the Illness Perceptions Questionnaire-Revised, and the Asthma Self-Care Practice Instrument. Data were analyzed using ANOVA, MANOVA, Pearson correlations, and multiple regressions. Results: Findings indicated that females whose asthma was not well controlled had more beliefs about the chronicity of their asthma than those who were well controlled. However, there were no differences in such beliefs among males whose asthma was not well controlled from those who were well controlled. Well controlled adolescents differed from not well controlled adolescents for cognitive representations of cyclic timeline, treatment control, psychological attributes, and consequences as well as for emotional representations. There were no significant differences in the means of the self-management behaviors by gender, by asthma impairment, or by gender by asthma impairment. A significant bivariate relationship was found between representations of identity, consequences, treatment control, and symptom management. In the multiple regression model, representations of treatment control and consequences contributed to variances in symptom management; however, no other representations, gender, or asthma impairment variables were statistically significant. The representations, gender, and asthma impairment variables did not contribute to variances in medication management or environmental control. Conclusion: Limited studies have been conducted with African American adolescents with asthma; therefore, the findings of this study add to the current knowledge of illness representations, gender, and asthma impairment and their relationship with self-management behaviors, particularly symptom management. The findings of this study also contribute to the literature on 'how African American adolescents' self-management behaviors can be improved.en
dc.subjectasthmaen
dc.subjectAfican Americanen
dc.subjectself-managementen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:54:50Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:54:50Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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