Integrating Increasingly Complex Simulation into a Junior Level II Course in a BSN Program to Provide Students with an Active Learning Strategy to Reinforce Learning

15.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601766
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Integrating Increasingly Complex Simulation into a Junior Level II Course in a BSN Program to Provide Students with an Active Learning Strategy to Reinforce Learning
Other Titles:
Simulation Used in the Pre-Licensure Environment [Session]
Author(s):
Dorau, Tina M.; Gawron, Barbara; O'Brien, Karen
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Omicron
Author Details:
Tina M. Dorau, RN, CRRN, tdorau@sbcglobal.net; Barbara Gawron, RN, CHSE; Karen O'Brien, RN, CNE
Abstract:
Session presented on Friday, July 24, 2015: Problem: Simulation has been used for years in other fields, whereas nursing has'only just'begun their quest to utilize high fidelity simulation in the last ten years. Nurse educators have been challenged by the IOM to change the way nurses are taught in order to improve the quality of care provided and'patient safety. 'The literature supports using simulation in nursing education and identifies it as a safe way for students to practice skills and build self-confidence in the management of complex patients without risk of harm to a patient.' The use of simulation is slowly being integrated into many nursing programs. Saint Xavier University had not yet integrated simulation into the junior II level Care of Adults nursing course. Therefore, this was an opportunity to offer students high fidelity simulation experiences to reinforce learning. Approach: Progressively complex simulation scenarios were defined as scenarios that built upon the previous one in both skill performance and patient complexity. The scenarios were developed between spring of 2014 through fall 2014. The first scenarios were piloted in spring of 2014 with a group of senior level students in leiu of clinical time. These scenarios were then modified and integrated into a junior II level Nursing Care of Adults course in the fall of 2014. The project objective was to'provide students with an opportunity to participate in simulations throughout their program. The goal was to 'promote self-satisfaction in learning, skills acquisition and reinforce learning Intervention: Three progressively complex simulation experiences were developed and integrated into the'junior II level Nursing Care of Adults'course in a BSN program.'The accelerated BSN students were able to participate in all three simulation scenarios which occurred on three seperate days after their exams. The traditional BSN students participated in two of the simulation experiences on one day in leiu of clinical time.The scenarios included pre-sim, simulation, debriefing, and two surveys for evaluation of the experience.'The surveys used were obtained fromthe Natinal League for Nurses'and used with their permission. The project utilized a convenience sample of 12 accelerated and 71 traditional BSN students totaling 83. Finding: Data was collected from observation, debriefing, and surveys which were collected after each simulation.' Observation revealed that some students were nervous while'others forgot what to do when put into a life-like situation. Debriefing supported these observations. The data gathered from the surveys supported continuing the use of simulation in the junior level course as well as expanding the current project to allow for'both'accelerated and traditional students to'participate in all three simulation experiences.'A barrier to implementing the simulation experiences'was the amount of time'required to circulate 83 students through the simulations.' Of the surveys completed correctly, the majority agreed or strongly agreed with most items on both surveys in support of simulation as being a beneficial educational practice that promotes self-confidence and satisfaction in learning. Students expressed they would like more simulations. Implications and Relevance to Nursing: Feedback'from this'project was'positive. The clinical instructors who were invited to participate in the debriefing sessions found the experiences to be beneficial to the students as well as'to them.It allowed the clinical faculty'to see how their students were doing clinically. Students do not always get to practice skills or gain the confidence needed during a traditional clinical setting. Simulation offers nurse educators an alternative educational pedagogy to meet the needs of today's nursing students.
Keywords:
Simulation; Nursing; Education
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15D06
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleIntegrating Increasingly Complex Simulation into a Junior Level II Course in a BSN Program to Provide Students with an Active Learning Strategy to Reinforce Learningen
dc.title.alternativeSimulation Used in the Pre-Licensure Environment [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorDorau, Tina M.en
dc.contributor.authorGawron, Barbaraen
dc.contributor.authorO'Brien, Karenen
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Omicronen
dc.author.detailsTina M. Dorau, RN, CRRN, tdorau@sbcglobal.net; Barbara Gawron, RN, CHSE; Karen O'Brien, RN, CNEen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601766-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Friday, July 24, 2015: Problem: Simulation has been used for years in other fields, whereas nursing has'only just'begun their quest to utilize high fidelity simulation in the last ten years. Nurse educators have been challenged by the IOM to change the way nurses are taught in order to improve the quality of care provided and'patient safety. 'The literature supports using simulation in nursing education and identifies it as a safe way for students to practice skills and build self-confidence in the management of complex patients without risk of harm to a patient.' The use of simulation is slowly being integrated into many nursing programs. Saint Xavier University had not yet integrated simulation into the junior II level Care of Adults nursing course. Therefore, this was an opportunity to offer students high fidelity simulation experiences to reinforce learning. Approach: Progressively complex simulation scenarios were defined as scenarios that built upon the previous one in both skill performance and patient complexity. The scenarios were developed between spring of 2014 through fall 2014. The first scenarios were piloted in spring of 2014 with a group of senior level students in leiu of clinical time. These scenarios were then modified and integrated into a junior II level Nursing Care of Adults course in the fall of 2014. The project objective was to'provide students with an opportunity to participate in simulations throughout their program. The goal was to 'promote self-satisfaction in learning, skills acquisition and reinforce learning Intervention: Three progressively complex simulation experiences were developed and integrated into the'junior II level Nursing Care of Adults'course in a BSN program.'The accelerated BSN students were able to participate in all three simulation scenarios which occurred on three seperate days after their exams. The traditional BSN students participated in two of the simulation experiences on one day in leiu of clinical time.The scenarios included pre-sim, simulation, debriefing, and two surveys for evaluation of the experience.'The surveys used were obtained fromthe Natinal League for Nurses'and used with their permission. The project utilized a convenience sample of 12 accelerated and 71 traditional BSN students totaling 83. Finding: Data was collected from observation, debriefing, and surveys which were collected after each simulation.' Observation revealed that some students were nervous while'others forgot what to do when put into a life-like situation. Debriefing supported these observations. The data gathered from the surveys supported continuing the use of simulation in the junior level course as well as expanding the current project to allow for'both'accelerated and traditional students to'participate in all three simulation experiences.'A barrier to implementing the simulation experiences'was the amount of time'required to circulate 83 students through the simulations.' Of the surveys completed correctly, the majority agreed or strongly agreed with most items on both surveys in support of simulation as being a beneficial educational practice that promotes self-confidence and satisfaction in learning. Students expressed they would like more simulations. Implications and Relevance to Nursing: Feedback'from this'project was'positive. The clinical instructors who were invited to participate in the debriefing sessions found the experiences to be beneficial to the students as well as'to them.It allowed the clinical faculty'to see how their students were doing clinically. Students do not always get to practice skills or gain the confidence needed during a traditional clinical setting. Simulation offers nurse educators an alternative educational pedagogy to meet the needs of today's nursing students.en
dc.subjectSimulationen
dc.subjectNursingen
dc.subjectEducationen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:54:58Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:54:58Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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