2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/601773
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mentoring Practices that Predict Mentoring Benefits in a Magnet' Hospital
Other Titles:
Impacts of Magnet Designation [Session]
Author(s):
Eliades, Aris; Weese, Meghan; Jakubik, Louise D.; Huth, Jennifer
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Delta Xi
Author Details:
Aris Eliades, RN, CNS, aeliades@chmca.org; Meghan Weese, RN, CPN; Louise D. Jakubik, RN-BC; Jennifer Huth, RN, CPN
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 25, 2015: Purpose: Although literature uniformly states the goal of mentoring is professional development of the prot'g', the specific practices predicting mentoring benefits are not clearly defined. Previous studies examining predictors of mentoring benefits among pediatric staff nurse prot'g's representing healthcare organizations across 26 states demonstrated that prot'g' perception of quality was the single best predictor of mentoring benefits. The study aim of this descriptive, correlational, non-experimental study of nurses at a Magnet' recognized, free-standing, pediatric hospital was to determine if mentoring practices predict mentoring benefits. Methods: A convenience sample of 186 pediatric nurses completed an electronic survey containing demographic items and two valid and reliable instruments, the Mentoring Practices Inventory and Mentoring Benefits Inventory in accordance with the Dillman 'Tailored Design Method'. Results: The research hypothesis that mentoring practices predict mentoring benefits was supported. The correlation between total mentoring practices and total mentoring benefits was 0.89 (p<0.01).' Stepwise linear regression analysis revealed an overall R = 0.889 with 79% of the variance in mentoring benefits explained by mentoring practices (p< 0.0001). Mentoring practices were positively and significantly associated with mentoring benefits (unstandardized beta=0.81, p< 0.001). For every unit increase in practices, a 0.81 unit increase in benefits is expected. ' Conclusion: As a result of this study, specific practices on how to mentor are now known. This evidence provides concrete, teachable and measurable mentoring practices and resulting mentoring benefits. Outcomes of this study lay the groundwork for creating a mentoring culture in nursing practice that demonstrates a structurally empowering work environment.
Keywords:
Mentoring; Research; Pediatric nursing
Repository Posting Date:
17-Mar-2016
Date of Publication:
17-Mar-2016 ; 17-Mar-2016
Other Identifiers:
INRC15F08
Conference Date:
2015
Conference Name:
26th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Description:
Research Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleMentoring Practices that Predict Mentoring Benefits in a Magnet' Hospitalen
dc.title.alternativeImpacts of Magnet Designation [Session]en
dc.contributor.authorEliades, Arisen
dc.contributor.authorWeese, Meghanen
dc.contributor.authorJakubik, Louise D.en
dc.contributor.authorHuth, Jenniferen
dc.contributor.departmentDelta Xien
dc.author.detailsAris Eliades, RN, CNS, aeliades@chmca.org; Meghan Weese, RN, CPN; Louise D. Jakubik, RN-BC; Jennifer Huth, RN, CPNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/601773-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 25, 2015: Purpose: Although literature uniformly states the goal of mentoring is professional development of the prot'g', the specific practices predicting mentoring benefits are not clearly defined. Previous studies examining predictors of mentoring benefits among pediatric staff nurse prot'g's representing healthcare organizations across 26 states demonstrated that prot'g' perception of quality was the single best predictor of mentoring benefits. The study aim of this descriptive, correlational, non-experimental study of nurses at a Magnet' recognized, free-standing, pediatric hospital was to determine if mentoring practices predict mentoring benefits. Methods: A convenience sample of 186 pediatric nurses completed an electronic survey containing demographic items and two valid and reliable instruments, the Mentoring Practices Inventory and Mentoring Benefits Inventory in accordance with the Dillman 'Tailored Design Method'. Results: The research hypothesis that mentoring practices predict mentoring benefits was supported. The correlation between total mentoring practices and total mentoring benefits was 0.89 (p<0.01).' Stepwise linear regression analysis revealed an overall R = 0.889 with 79% of the variance in mentoring benefits explained by mentoring practices (p< 0.0001). Mentoring practices were positively and significantly associated with mentoring benefits (unstandardized beta=0.81, p< 0.001). For every unit increase in practices, a 0.81 unit increase in benefits is expected. ' Conclusion: As a result of this study, specific practices on how to mentor are now known. This evidence provides concrete, teachable and measurable mentoring practices and resulting mentoring benefits. Outcomes of this study lay the groundwork for creating a mentoring culture in nursing practice that demonstrates a structurally empowering work environment.en
dc.subjectMentoringen
dc.subjectResearchen
dc.subjectPediatric nursingen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T12:55:09Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-17-
dc.date.issued2016-03-17en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T12:55:09Zen
dc.conference.date2015en
dc.conference.name26th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationSan Juan, Puerto Ricoen
dc.descriptionResearch Congress 2015 Theme: Question Locally, Engage Regionally, Apply Globally. Held at the Puerto Rico Convention Center.en
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